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The Mission To Boldly Go Where Standards Have Never Gone Before….

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Presentation on theme: "The Mission To Boldly Go Where Standards Have Never Gone Before…."— Presentation transcript:

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2 The Mission To Boldly Go Where Standards Have Never Gone Before….

3 Original GoalCoded GoalUnwrappedBig IdeasEssential Questions Unpacking The Standard Course of Study 11 th Grade U.S. History The learner will analyze the economic, political, and social reforms of the Progressive Period. The learner will analyze the economic reforms of the Progressive Period. The learner will analyze the political reforms of the Progressive Period. The learner will analyze the social reforms of the Progressive Period. Rapid change, often associated with scientific and technological advances, benefits some, at the expense of others. Reforms initiated by both government and individuals address economic, political and social problems associated with a rapidly changing society. Reform movements do not always benefit everyone equally. Over time, government has become more responsive to the needs of its citizens. How did Americans of this period define progress? Why is there a need for social, economic, and political reform during this time period? To what extent did progressive political reform successfully combat the social and economic ills created by a rapidly industrializing society? How were the social, political, and economic standing of labor, women and African Americans impacted by progressive efforts?

4 Essential Questions Facts (What students should know)Concepts: (What students should understand) Skills: (What students should be able to do) How did Americans of this period define progress? Why is there a need for social, economic, and political reform during this time period? To what extent did progressive political reform successfully combat the social and economic ills created by a rapidly industrializing society? How were the social, political, and economic standing of labor, women and African Americans impacted by progressive efforts? Muckrakers Jane Adams Hepburn Act Alexander Graham Bell Ida Tarbell Meat Inspection Act Jacob Riis Pure Food & Drug Act Upton Sinclair Plessy v. Ferguson Lincoln Steffens Newlands Reclamation Triangle Shirtwaist Fire Booker T. Washington Carrie Nation Atlanta Compromise WCTU W.E.B. Du Bois Anti-Saloon League Ida B. Wells Frederick Winslow Taylor Henry Ford Robert La Follette Niagara Movement Charles B. Aycock NAACP Louis Brandeis Theodore Roosevelt Florence Kelley William H. Taft Lewis Hine Woodrow Wilson Muller v. Oregon Payne-Aldrich Tariff Northern Securities v. U.S. Election of 1912 Initiative, referendum, recall Eugene V. Debs 16th 17th 18th 19th Amendments Clayton Anti-Trust Act Commission system FTC council-manager system Federal Reserve Susan B. Anthony Thomas Edison Sherman Anti-trust Act Frederick Olmstead 1902 Pennsylvania Coal Strike YMCAPowerStrikeTechnologyInnovationSystemReformProgressProgressivismInterpretationIdentityLeadership Social gospel Mass culture ProhibitionConservationSegregationAccommodationFranchise/DisenfranchisementCitizenshipIndustryDiversityConflict Describe and interpret political, economic, and cultural ideologies. Compare and contrast perspective and biases evident in primary source documents. Generate expository and creative writing to express insights and conclusions of key aspects of the time period. Debate and defend personal interpretations of key events and issues including reflective and expressive writing, class discussion and seminars. Analyze historical political cartoons and illustrate reflections of the time period.

5 Facts Constitution district court internet Bill of Rights Frederick Douglass Transcontinental railroad Mesopotamia Congress Suez Canal advertising Mississippi River Franklin Roosevelt Treaty of Versailles American Revolution Interest ratelatitude Rome Marbury v. Madison trade Foreign trade telephone Pearl Harbor 13 th Amendment The Cold War Andrew Carnegie Factory system

6 Concepts challenge justice technology rights independence movement domestic policy capitalism identity Supply and demand revolution protest responsibility revolution interdependence equality citizenship wealth globalization trade innovation war freedom inequity Competition opportunity

7 What is a Concept? “A mental construct that frames a set of examples sharing common attributes.” - H. Lynn Erickson

8 A Concept is: Timeless Universal Abstract and Broad (to various degrees) Topical Examples Share Common Attributes Represented by 1-2 words Taken from H. Lynn Erickson Transfer

9 Identifying Concepts A.Concept B. Topic Environment

10 Identifying Concepts A.Concept B. Topic Computer Age

11 Identifying Concepts A.Concept B. Topic Great Depression

12 Identifying Concepts A.Concept B. Topic Culture

13 Identifying Concepts A.Concept B. Topic Supply and Demand

14 Identifying Concepts A.Concept B. Topic Movement

15 Identifying Concepts A.Concept B. Topic System

16 Identifying Concepts A.Concept B. Topic Civil War

17 Identifying Concepts A.Concept B. Topic Manifest Destiny

18 What is Vertical Articulation?

19 What are the 10 most important concepts that students need to understand for your grade level/course? Timeless Universal Abstract and Broad Topical Examples Share Common Attributes Represented by 1-2 words Vertical Articulation Exercise Characteristics of ConceptsGroup Assignment

20 What are the 5 most important concepts that students need to know throughout Social Studies? Identifying Essential Discipline Concepts Vertical Articulation Exercise

21 Compare how each of these concepts are taught and assessed at a particular grade level. Vertical Articulation Exercise

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