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Team-Based Learning and the Business Strategy Game used simultaneously in a Business Strategy Course; are the two compatible? Robert A. Herring III School.

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Presentation on theme: "Team-Based Learning and the Business Strategy Game used simultaneously in a Business Strategy Course; are the two compatible? Robert A. Herring III School."— Presentation transcript:

1 Team-Based Learning and the Business Strategy Game used simultaneously in a Business Strategy Course; are the two compatible? Robert A. Herring III School of Business and Economics, Winston-Salem State University USA

2 Contact Information Robert A. Herring III, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Management School of Business and Economics RJR Building Room 114 Winston-Salem State University Winston-Salem NC 27110, USA Phone: 336-750-2338 Fax: 336-750-2335 E-mail: herringr@wssu.edu

3 Purpose of Session This session describes the use of Team-Based Learning (TBL) in conjunction with use of the Business Strategy Game (BSG) (http://www.bsg-online.com/) in an undergraduate business policy class.

4 Overarching Research Question Do the adaptations made to TBL practices for selection methods and size of teams impact the effectiveness of the teams?

5 What Is The Business Strategy Game? The following several slides briefly explain the Business Strategy Game. The Business Policy course is a senior- level capstone course, required of all business majors. The course pulls together topics from discipline-specific courses, and views them from a top-management, strategic view point.

6 What Is The Business Strategy Game All About? Its an online, PC-based exercise where student teams run an athletic footwear company in head-to-head competition against companies run by other class members. The marketplace is worldwideproduction and sales activities can be pursued in North America, Latin America, Europe- Africa, and Asia Pacific

7 How Does The Business Strategy Game Work? All companies start out on the same footingwith equal sales volume, global market share, revenues, profits, costs, footwear quality, and so on. Each decision period in The Business Strategy Game represents a year. The company you will be running began operations 10 years ago, and the first set of decisions you and your co- managers will make is for Year 11. The company had Year 10 revenues of $238 million, net profits of $25 million (equal to $2.50 per share), had an ROE of ~17%, and a solid B+ credit rating.

8 The Types and Numbers of Decisions You and your co-managers will make decisions each period relating to Production of branded and private-label athletic footwear (up to 10 decisions each plant, with a maximum of 4 plants) Plant capacity additions/sales/upgrades (up to 6 decisions per plant) Worker compensation and training (3 decisions per plant) Shipping (up to 8 decisions each plant) Pricing and marketing (up to 10 decisions in 4 geographic regions) Bids to sign celebrities to endorse your companys footwear (2 decision entries per bid) Financing of company operations (up to 8 decisions) Plus there is a screen for making annual sales forecasts and deciding whether to have inventory clearance sales

9 The Two Scoring Standards Two scoring standards are used in calculating performance scores for each company: –The investors expectations standard (Did you meet or beat the annual performance targets for each of the 5 performance measures?) –The best-in-industry standard (How well does your companys performance stack up against the company with the best EPS, ROE, stock price, and image rating and against an industry-best A+ credit rating?)

10 Competitive Variables That Determine Company Sales and Market Shares Price Number of models/styles Styling/quality (S/Q) rating Advertising Size of retailer network Celebrity endorsements Delivery time Retailer support Mail-in rebates Shipping charges (Internet sales only)

11 Creative Strategizing Company managers have the widest possible strategic latitude in staking out a market position and striving for good performance. –Any of the various generic competitive strategies can be used Most any well-conceived, well-executed competitive approach is capable of succeeding, provided it is not overpowered by the strategies of competitors or defeated by the presence of too many copycat strategies that dilute its effectiveness.

12 What Students Learn from playing the Business Strategy Game Running the athletic footwear company in head-on competition with rivals gives students a chance to put into play the very kinds of things they are reading in the text about crafting and executing strategy in a globally competitive marketplace.

13 The student teams (companies) have to: --chart a long-term direction for their companies --set and achieve strategic and financial objectives, --craft a strategy --adapt it to changing industry and competitive conditions.

14 Students wrestle with a full array of industry statistics, company operating reports and financial statements, and an assortment of benchmarking data and competitive intelligence on what rivals are doing. They match strategic wits with the managers of rival companies, "think strategically" about their company's competitive market position, and figure out the kinds of actions it will take to outcompete rivals.

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18 Back to the Research Question Do the adaptations made to TBL practices for selection method and size of teams impact their effectiveness? Adaptations had to be made to recommended practice in both TBL and the BSG.

19 Adaptations to TBL and BSG Practice TBL Teams were of 4 or 5 students; on the low end of or below of TBL recommended 5-7. TBL method of selecting heterogen- eous teams not used. Roles partially assigned BSG BSG recommends teams of 2-3. Company CEOs were selected by instructor and then recruited their teams. BSG decisions made outside of class

20 Classes and Sizes Business Policy: –Section 01: 34 (8 teams) –Section 02: 30 (8 teams) –Section 03: 20 (4 teams) Quality Management and Control (comparison group): 25 (4 teams of 6-7 each)

21 Data Analysis 1. ANOVA comparing the summed total of Likert Scale items for the 4 groups. 2. ANOVA comparing the summed total of Likert Scale items for the group size.

22 Results from comparing the summed total of Likert Scale items for the 4 groups

23 Results from comparing the summed total of Likert Scale items for the group size

24 Results No significant differences found. The bulk of the answers were 4s and 5s, both for the 3 Business Policy sections as well as the comparison class

25 Future Plans A different experimental design will be tried in the future.


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