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C. Laverty 1 2002-05-01Queens University The New Plagiarism Rise of the Copy and Paste Generation Cory Laverty Spring Institute for Faculty.

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Presentation on theme: "C. Laverty 1 2002-05-01Queens University The New Plagiarism Rise of the Copy and Paste Generation Cory Laverty Spring Institute for Faculty."— Presentation transcript:

1 C. Laverty Queens University The New Plagiarism Rise of the Copy and Paste Generation Cory Laverty Spring Institute for Faculty

2 C. Laverty Queens University Outline Forms and causes of plagiarism Extent of plagiarism in high schools and universities Methods for detecting plagiarism Methods for discouraging plagiarism

3 C. Laverty Queens University What is Plagiarism? Queens defines plagiarism as … presenting work done (in whole or in part) by someone else as if it were one's own. Plagiarism can involve: Failure to cite another author's work. Paraphrasing without acknowledgement. Direct word-for-word copying (copy & paste!)

4 C. Laverty Queens University What Causes Plagiarism? Students plagiarize when they are unable to: Understand an assignment. Express ideas and construct arguments. Find appropriate learning resources. Take notes and document sources effectively. They also copy when they are: Pressured to do well (*cited as top reason: Toward a culture of academic integrity. Chronicle of Higher Education (Oct. 15, 1999). Pressed for time. From a culture where copying is an accepted practice.

5 C. Laverty Queens University Its Making Headlines Plagiarism is a widespread problem at Canadian universities, academic officials said yesterday, after learning 47 students at Simon Fraser University cheated on an economics assignment. Source: Universities rife with plagiarism, academics say: Officials not shocked by cheating case involving 47 students, National Post, January 8, 2002, National Edition, p.A2

6 C. Laverty Queens University Thirty engineering students at Carleton University accused of plagiarism fit the profile of the typical cheater, according to research. Source: 30 accused plagiarizers fit cheater profile, study says Engineering and business students 'are more likely to cheat' than other students: Carleton University, National Post Online, March 28, Its Making Headlines

7 C. Laverty Queens University A study of almost 4,500 students at 25 schools, conducted in 2000/2001, suggests cheating is a significant problem in high school – 74% of the respondents admitted to one or more instances of serious test cheating and 72% admitted to serious cheating on written assignments. Source: Center for Academic Integrity at: Recent Findings: High School

8 C. Laverty Queens University On most campuses, over 75% of students admit to some cheating. In a 1999 survey of 2,100 students on 21 campuses across the country, about one-third of the participating students admitted to serious test cheating and half admitted to one or more instances of serious cheating on written assignments. Source: Center for Academic Integrity at: Recent Findings: University

9 C. Laverty Queens University A 1999 study by the Center for Academic Integrity found that 69% of professors catch one or more instances of plagiarism each year. … In recent years they have seen a sharp increase in students cutting and pasting material into papers from Web sites without attribution, or purchasing term papers from on-line term-paper mills. Source: Connelly Chronicle online: Chronicle online Recent Findings: Faculty

10 C. Laverty Queens University Approaches to Plagiarism Three approaches to cheating and plagiarism: Appeal to student virtue: Foster an ethical and aware environment Use evaluation methods to discourage it: Reduce opportunities through individualized assignments; reduce pressure to cheat Police student work: Use plagiarism-checking software to detect cheaters; enforce punishment

11 C. Laverty Queens University Online Testing There are departments at Queens that give exams online; take homes raise similar problems. No guarantee that you are receiving the work of the named individual. Consider what you are trying to measure. Individualization helps – ask students to relate a question to work they have already done; generate questions at random.

12 C. Laverty Queens University Detecting Plagiarism See: Detecting PlagiarismDetecting Plagiarism Look for unusual physical features. Test suspicious phrases on the web. Search an e-journal collection. Check paper mill essay titles. Purchase detection software – debatable.

13 C. Laverty Queens University Discouraging Plagiarism See: Discouraging PlagiarismDiscouraging Plagiarism Review plagiarism concepts in class. Focus on research. Outline information literacy objectives. Provide information literacy instruction. Require documentation of the research process. Assess the research process using a rubric.

14 C. Laverty Queens University Alternative Assignments See: Alternative Research AssignmentsAlternative Research Assignments Review and compare information tools that provide resources in a specific subject area. Find a newspaper article and locate scholarly evidence to support or refute it. Locate publications by and about a historical personality. Track the progress of a piece of legislation. Review periodical literature to identify major contributors in a field.

15 C. Laverty Queens University Partner with Your Librarian Please contact the liaison librarian in your department for: Information literacy instruction. Assignment design that discourages plagiarism. Descriptions of electronic resources accessed on the Web that can be used in student assignments. Common student problems with interpretation of research assignments. Tutorials for teaching assistants on becoming a research mentor. Tutorials on plagiarism for students.


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