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To start... Open doorSkills test. On the move Unit 1: Global Challenges - Going Global Lesson 4: European migration.

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Presentation on theme: "To start... Open doorSkills test. On the move Unit 1: Global Challenges - Going Global Lesson 4: European migration."— Presentation transcript:

1 To start... Open doorSkills test

2 On the move Unit 1: Global Challenges - Going Global Lesson 4: European migration

3 Economic migration What is it?

4 The Schengen Agreement In 1995 the Schengen Agreement was implemented enabling easier movement of people and goods within the EU. The UK did not sign the agreement, preferring to keep its border controls. Some of the newer EU members joined the agreement in In 2004 the UK, Ireland and Sweden allowed free migration but other members imposed restrictions for up to 7 years.

5 FranceDenmarkGreecePortugalAustriaCyprusBulgaria West GermanyIrelandSpainFinlandCzech RepublicRomania NetherlandsUnited KingdomSwedenEstonia BelgiumHungary Luxemburg Latvia ItalyLithuania Malta Poland Slovakia Slovenia EU member timeline

6 Task 1 -Movement within Europe a)Using page 136, shade in the map to show net migration in Europe, label the countries and add a key. b)Answer the questions below the map with reference to specific examples and including a definition of the following key terms: Net migration Post-accession labour flows/migration

7 Task 2 - Video Why have polish people been migrating to the UK? Impacts for the destination country (UK)? Consequences for the source country (Poland etc)

8 Impacts on UK £2.54bn is contributed to the economy annually by eastern European immigrants in the UK. Migrants have contributed 0.5 to 1% of the UKs economic growth in 2005 and % of new migrants are working people between the ages of 18 and 35. This offsets the tendency for the UKs population to age, addressing the difficulties in providing for an ageing population. National Insurance contributions would have to be higher if immigration was lower. The new migrants are stereotypically hard-working, enthusiastic, skilled and flexible.

9 Task 3 - Practice question Why are some areas of the UK more attractive than others for economic migrants? (2 marks)

10 To conclude Looking at Britains economy as a whole, with high growth, low unemployment and low interest rates, the arrival of Poles, Czechs and the rest seems an unequivocal bonus, helping to fill skills shortages, boosting productivity and creating new taxpayers. For almost a million workers who remain unemployed while Eastern Europeans win new jobs, the analysis may look rather different. But closing the doors to migrants wont help, while better training and education might. (workpermit.com)


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