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Lawrence Egulu (ICFTU-AFRO), December 10, 2005 “The Role of Trade Unions in the Global Economy and the Fight against Poverty”

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Presentation on theme: "Lawrence Egulu (ICFTU-AFRO), December 10, 2005 “The Role of Trade Unions in the Global Economy and the Fight against Poverty”"— Presentation transcript:

1 Lawrence Egulu (ICFTU-AFRO), December 10, 2005 “The Role of Trade Unions in the Global Economy and the Fight against Poverty”

2 Lawrence Egulu (ICFTU-AFRO), December 10, 2005 Introduction There has been a reduction in global poverty in the last two decades and some countries are enjoying unprecedented economic growth, almost a half of humanity still survives on less than US$2 a day. There have been several initiatives at eradicating poverty The ILO and trade unions have a role in the global economy and the fight against poverty

3 Lawrence Egulu (ICFTU-AFRO), December 10, 2005 Globalization Globalization has been defined as “the gradual integration of economies and societies driven by new technologies, new economic relationships and the national and international organizations, business, labour and civil society”. Because different individuals or countries profit differently from globalization, the challenge is its governance in order for it to reduce poverty, create decent jobs, equity, and sustainable development for all.

4 Lawrence Egulu (ICFTU-AFRO), December 10, 2005 What is poverty? Poverty in terms of lack of access to basic capabilities and opportunities for an individual or group of people in society to achieve some minimally acceptable levels of basic life - food, clothing, shelter and avoidance of preventable diseases to more complex social achievements such as taking part in the life of the community, and being able to appear in public in dignity, among other things. The poor are also powerless, voiceless, and live in constant fear. This helplessness subjects them to rudeness, humiliation, shame, inhumane treatment, and exploitation at the hands of institutions of state and society. Estimates claim that up to 70 percent of the world’s poor are women.

5 Lawrence Egulu (ICFTU-AFRO), December 10, 2005

6 Employment and poverty In 2003, a total of 185.9 million were unemployed globally. 1.39 billion people were at work but still lived below the US$2 a day poverty line. Among them, 550 million lived on less than US$ 1 a day (two-thirds whom were women subsistence farmers and agricultural labourers). Half of the world’s workers (and close to 60 percent of the developing world’s workers) were living below the US$2 a day threshold. At the same time 19.7 percent of the world’s working people (and 23.3 percent of developing country workers) were living on US$1 a day. This is the phenomenon of the "working poor". Employment does not always pull people out of poverty. To work oneself out of poverty, the creation of decent jobs is therefore a strategy that countries need to pursue.

7 Lawrence Egulu (ICFTU-AFRO), December 10, 2005 Development policies Marshall Plan The market economy Centralized planned Mixed economies The colonial mode of production The “trickle down” model Import substitution strategy Export-led The basic needs approach The “Washington Consensus” – stabilization and adjustment programs UNICEF published “Adjustment with a Human Face” UNECA presented the African Alternative Framework to Structural Adjustment Programs for Socio-Economic Recovery and Transformation (AAF-SAF) Poverty Reduction Strategy Papers (PRSPs)

8 Lawrence Egulu (ICFTU-AFRO), December 10, 2005 Decent Work in the global economy – the ILO approach “the converging focus of all its four strategic objectives: the promotion of rights at work; employment; social protection; and social dialogue”…” Decent work means productive work in which rights are protected, which generates an adequate income, with adequate social protection. It also means sufficient work, in the sense that all should have full access to income-earning opportunities. It marks the high road to economic and social development, a road in which employment, income and social protection can be achieved without compromising workers' rights and social standards”.

9 Lawrence Egulu (ICFTU-AFRO), December 10, 2005 DW’s four strategic objectives fundamental principles and rights at work; employment; social protection; and social dialogue.

10 Lawrence Egulu (ICFTU-AFRO), December 10, 2005 TUs actions in the governance of globalization and the fight against poverty (1) Free and strong trade unionism is a sine qua non for sustained national development Extending Rights to the poor Trade union organizing Collective bargaining and social dialogue Combating disease and promoting health and safety at work Trade union self-help initiatives against poverty Engaging International Financing Institutions Engaging regional groupings Engaging MNEs Protecting universal access to public goods Campaigning for trade justice

11 Lawrence Egulu (ICFTU-AFRO), December 10, 2005 TUs actions in the governance of globalization and the fight against poverty (2) Promoting a rights-based approach to development Gender Social dialogue The creation of decent jobs Macroeconomic policy for job creation Social protection for all Investment in agriculture Social justice in the global economy Debt cancellation and increased ODA Trade for decent jobs and poverty reduction


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