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Leading with Knowledge Organisational Wisdom is the Capital that keeps your organisation in front Last edit:07-Nov-2010 All material copyright Rudolf P.

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Presentation on theme: "Leading with Knowledge Organisational Wisdom is the Capital that keeps your organisation in front Last edit:07-Nov-2010 All material copyright Rudolf P."— Presentation transcript:

1 Leading with Knowledge Organisational Wisdom is the Capital that keeps your organisation in front Last edit:07-Nov-2010 All material copyright Rudolf P Muller, Leadership-ConneXion, partial reproduction must quote source. © 2010

2 1.Who has most processes bedded down and documented? 50% 2.Who has an Information Technology Manager? 48% 3.Who has a Knowledge Management Manager? 10% 4.Who can clearly explain her/his organisational vision? 57% 5.Who has implemented some or all of the Zachman Enterprise Architecture Framework? 3% 6.Whos organisation has a business model that she/he understands? 42% 7.Who thinks her/his organisation is innovative? 21% 8.Who can explain in which way your organisation is innovative? 21% 9.Who does fully trust all staff members (above & below current level)? 6 % 10.Who has a good personal reason not to disclose some knowledge at her/his disposal? 57% Some questions to assess the audience Some questions to assess the audience

3 You only know what you dont know when you need to know it Axiom

4 The question is: How to harvest it? How top performing large company's life cycle is structured How top performing large company's life cycle is structured

5 The Pendulum Of Government Conjecture Total Command & Control Detailed Processes & Procedures to minute detail Anarchy No control, processes & procedures First published 2003 R P Muller

6 Butterfly decision point Butterfly transition point Highest Efficiency Area of ever diminishing ROI Highest Effectiveness Area of ever diminishing effectiveness

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8 After Peter Senges Fifth Discipline, Lessons from the Field

9 Gaining these insights, what can be done to move organisations towards improving (and thus institutionalising {operationalising}) the body of knowledge vested in your organisations people.

10 What is popular &/vs what works? The Nonake modelThe Nonake model The Cynefin Model of Know-How networksThe Cynefin Model of Know-How networks The ASHEN (knowledge classification) ModelThe ASHEN (knowledge classification) Model Knowledge Disclosure Points (KDP)Knowledge Disclosure Points (KDP) KDP & ASHEN combinationKDP & ASHEN combination Communities of Interest / Practice (CoI/CoP)Communities of Interest / Practice (CoI/CoP) Infrastructure requirementsInfrastructure requirements

11 The Nonake Model

12 The Cynefin Model of Know-How networks

13 The ASHEN Model David Snowden of the IBM Institute for Knowledge Management Knowledge Management July 2000 Vol 3 Issue 10 pp15-19

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15 Knowledge Disclosure Points (KDP)

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17 A. Maher (insert pic) published this diagram in 2002 as part of her paper Wheel of Wisdom

18 Communities of Interest A group of sharing information and discussing that interests them.A group of people interested in sharing information and discussing a particular topic that interests them. Members are not necessarily experts nor practitioners of the topic subject to the CoI.Members are not necessarily experts nor practitioners of the topic subject to the CoI. The purpose of the CoI is to provide a place where people who share a common interest can go and exchange information, ask questions, and express their opinions about the topic. Details may not be actual or correct.The purpose of the CoI is to provide a place where people who share a common interest can go and exchange information, ask questions, and express their opinions about the topic. Details may not be actual or correct. Membership in a CoI is not dependent upon expertise - participants only need to be interested in the subject.Membership in a CoI is not dependent upon expertise - participants only need to be interested in the subject.

19 Communities of Practise A group of people who are practitioners and share an interest, a craft, and/or a profession. Such group evolves naturally because of the members' common interest in a particular domain or area, or it can be created specifically with the goal of gaining knowledge related to their field. It is through the process of sharing information and experiences with the group that the members learn from each other, and have an opportunity to develop themselves personally and professionally (Lave & Wenger 1991). CoPs can exist online, such as within discussion boards and newsgroups, or in real life, such as in a lunchroom at work, in a field setting, on a factory floor, or elsewhere in the environment. While Lave and Wenger coined the term in the 1990s, this type of learning practice has existed for as long as people have been learning and sharing their experiences through storytelling.

20 Communities of practice and knowledge management Wasko and Faraj (2000) describe three kinds of knowledge: "knowledge as object", "knowledge embedded within individuals", and "knowledge embedded in a community". Communities of Practice have become associated with finding, sharing, transferring, and archiving knowledge, as well as making explicit "expertise", or tacit knowledge. Tacit knowledge is considered to be those valuable context-based experiences that can not easily be captured, codified and stored (Davenport & Prusak 2000), also (Hildreth & Kimble 2002).2000tacit knowledgeDavenport & Prusak 2000Hildreth & Kimble 2002 Because knowledge management is seen "primarily as a problem of capturing, organizing, and retrieving information, evoking notions of databases, documents, query languages, and data mining" (Thomas, Kellogg & Erickson 2001), the community of practice, collectively and individually, is considered a rich potential source of helpful information in the form of actual experiences; in other words, best practices 1 ).knowledge managementThomas, Kellogg & Erickson 2001best practices Thus, for knowledge management, a community of practice is a major source of content and context that - if codified, documented and archived - can be accessed for later use.

21 The nature of a CoP is dynamic Design the community to evolve naturally - The nature of a CoP is dynamic. Create opportunities for open dialog within and with outside perspectives - While the members and their knowledge are the CoP's most valuable resource, it is also beneficial to look outside of the CoP to understand the different possibilities for achieving their learning goals. Welcome and allow different levels of participation 1) The core group who participate intensely in the community through discussions and projects. This group typically takes on leadership roles in guiding the group 2) The active group who attend and participate regularly. 3) The peripheral group who, while they are passive participants in the community, still learn from their level of involvement. Typically represents the majority of the community. Develop both public and private community spaces - While CoP's typically operate in public spaces where all members share, discuss and explore ideas, they should also offer private exchanges. Focus on the value of the community - CoP's should create opportunities for participants to explicitly discuss the value and productivity of their participation in the group. Combine familiarity and excitement - CoP's should offer the expected learning opportunities as part of their structure Find and nurture a regular rhythm for the community - CoP's should coordinate a thriving cycle of activities. The pace should maintain an anticipated level of engagement to sustain the vibrancy of the community, yet not be so fast-paced that it becomes unwieldy and overwhelming in its intensity. (Wenger, McDermott & Snyder 2002)

22 Knowledge Management supporting ICT infrastructure must:. be designed for fast and easy input without impacting staffs ongoing work. be designed to intelligently know what cues to give, depending on the way staff needs them. be able to accept sound without adding to the preparation time for input. be able to accept and deliver multimedia and streaming media to staff as and when required. be able to deliver knowledge-items, information and data in push-mode, knowing the role requirements of staff. be able to automatically establish relationship between knowledge items based on existing organisational taxonomies. provide active prompting on input of usage of non-standard terms. be guided by a well-designed organisational search-strategy. provide real and un-real time chat and / or voice communication


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