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Day 6: Reporting MODULE 9: REPORTING. Reporting Good reporters have to be on the scene to _________ firsthand. GOOD REPORTERS LOOK AND LISTEN FOR THEIR.

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Presentation on theme: "Day 6: Reporting MODULE 9: REPORTING. Reporting Good reporters have to be on the scene to _________ firsthand. GOOD REPORTERS LOOK AND LISTEN FOR THEIR."— Presentation transcript:

1 Day 6: Reporting MODULE 9: REPORTING

2 Reporting Good reporters have to be on the scene to _________ firsthand. GOOD REPORTERS LOOK AND LISTEN FOR THEIR READERS. EVERYONE AT AN ACTIVITY OR EVENT IS A ___________SOURCE. SOME SOURCES OFFER BETTER _______________THAN OTHERS. INFORMATION _____________STARTS WITH THE FIVE W’S AND H.

3 Information Gathering Requires: The who, _______, where, when, why, and how questions that are fundamental to all ___________________. Past volumes of the yearbook and issues of school and local newspapers can give reporters information on the history of an activity or event, as well as on the angles that have been covered in the past. The library, local clipping files, the internet – they’re all places to seek out insights and facts that can enhance the reporting and writing of a story.

4 Reporting RESEARCH adds depth and details to the story. __________________HELPS REPORTERS UNDERSTAND THEIR STORIES. PREVIOUSLY PUBLISHED MATERIAL IS A PLACE TO START RESEARCHING A STORY. __________________PROVIDE BACKGROUND AND MATERIAL THAT MAY BECOME PART OF A STORY.

5 Primary sources can be integrated into a story… ________________– provide background information. Preliminary interviews set the stage for future interviews and may suggest additional questions. Polls – solicit feedback from a random sample of readers. 10% of a group should be surveyed for valid statistical results. Results are reported in percentages. _______________ -yield insights but have less validity than polls. If results are used in a story, the number of people surveyed should always be given. Results are reported as “___ out of 10” (10 is a common sample size). Focus Groups – offer thoughts of readers directly involved or affected. A diverse group of readers come together to discuss a topic; the discussion is guided and recorded by reporters.

6 Reporting RESEARCH adds depth and details to the story. RESEARCH HELPS REPORTERS UNDERSTAND THEIR STORIES. PREVIOUSLY PUBLISHED MATERIAL IS A PLACE TO START RESEARCHING A STORY. PRIMARY SOURCES PROVIDE BACKGROUND AND MATERIAL THAT MAY BECOME PART OF A STORY.

7 Reporting Thoughtful ____________ works result in stories with substance. THE BETTER THE QUESTION, THE BETTER THE ANSWERS. ACTIVE LISTENING PRODUCES THE BEST RESULTS. GOOD NOTES CONTAIN DIRECT QUOTES AND FACTS.

8 Question Selection is Important: Open-ended questions: give the source the opportunity to tell a story, give opinions or express reactions; often lead to the best storytelling quotes. _________-ended questions: require short answers and give information that results in specific facts also vital to telling a story. Questions that ask for yes/no answers usually require a follow-up. Follow up questions: might not be on the initial list but come up during the interview. The most effective follow-up questions is “Why?” Remember good notes require direct quotes and facts.

9 Day 6: Writing MODULE 10: WRITING

10 Writing The _________ capture and organize the story. A WRITER USES QUESTIONS TO HELP FOCUS THE STORY. IF THE NOTES SEEM INCOMPLETE, THERE IS MORE REPORTING TO DO. ORGANIZING NOTES HELPS WITH DECISIONS ABOUT CONTENT.

11 Organizing notes: Revealing details, facts, figures and feelings, that bring stories and the people in them to life insightful, storytelling quotes that reveal key aspects of stories and personalities of sources ideas for headlines or visuals interesting specifics for the lead.

12 Writing ORGANIZING YOUR NOTES: Color highlighters organize information, making it easier to write the story.

13 Writing Good STORIES come in many forms. THE BEST FEATURE STORIES PUT INFORMATION IN A HUMAN CONTEXT. QUICK READS OFFER AN ALTERNATIVE TO FEATURES.

14 Features needed in a story: Lead – the opening sentence or paragraph introduces the story, sets the tone and angle and grabs the readers’ interests. __________– word-for-word statements from sources show a reaction to, an explanation for or an interpretation of an activity, event or issue. Quotes with full attribution (individual’s name and year in school or other identifier) add voices and human interest to a story. __________– These details (facts and figures, descriptions) give context to quotes and make them more meaningful. Transition paragraphs inform readers and help them understand what sources are talking about. Every transition selection contains the seed for the next quote. Conclusion: The final sentence or paragraph ties the end of a story back to the lead; it gives a story a sense of completeness. A story should end with a strong point or quote, not with an editorial comment from the writer.

15 Writing FAST FACTS: Information makes a dynamic visual presentation with creative typography and graphics.

16 Writing Two approaches are used to report on the Prom – a CHART and a TIMELINE.

17 Writing PROFILES: Using a listing approach, “favorites” provide insights into student personalities.

18 Writing TOP 10: Ten quotes and five photos make for a dynamic presentation on teachers.

19 Writing INFOGRAPH: Survey results are reported in a visual way. Student quotes humanize the data.

20 Writing “REAL” COPY: To support the theme, students are profiled on every spread with listings and photos.

21 Writing Effective yearbook writing shares traits with all _________ WRITING. GOOD COPY STARTS WITH SOLID SUBSTANCE. GOOD COPY SEEMS TIGHTLY WRITTEN AND LIVELY. GOOD COPY UTILIZES NARRATIVE ELEMENTS. GOOD COPY SEEMS FRESH AND ORIGINAL.

22 For each error, we as a yearbook team suffer after production stages in terms of $$$ Conduct sincere, critical edits, and if you are unsure about something ask!!! This is one skill required to work on this team.

23 MODULE 11: HEADLINES Day 7: Headlines

24 Today’s Agenda: 1)Headlines Note 2)Captions Note 3)Editing Note 4)Photography 1 Note 5)Photography 2 Note 6)Typography Note 7) Submit layout spreads and homework from last week

25 Headlines With impact words and specific facts, headlines contribute to REPORTING a story. HEADLINES PROVIDE A MAJOR ENTRY POINT FOR READERS. COMPONENTS COMBINE FOR STORYTELLING POWER. PRIMARY AND SECONDARY HEADLINE PATTERNS ADD INTEREST.

26 __________ Headlines: The main headline, a few well-selected, creatively designed words, captures reader’ attention and delivers the dominant message.

27 ____________Headlines The second tier of information is short and catchy and adds specific information and more detail about the subject. The secondary head is often written in sentence style.

28 ________Headline At a glance word or short phrase details page/spread content. A primary headline is often in the form of a label.

29 ________________ Secondary headlines used within a story break up blocks of text, inform readers about content and provide added entry points.

30 __________Headline A showcased quote or factoid adds value to primary and secondary headlines. Or, a secondary headline and the lead of a story might be combined into a single element.

31 Types of Headline Patters that Add Interest! 1)Kicker – a single line secondary headline placed above the primary head provides specific facts and sometimes leads into the main head. 2)______________– a multi-line secondary headline placed above the primary head sometimes showcases a quote. 3)Hammer – a primary headline is placed above the secondary head. 4)___________– a multi-line secondary headline that is placed beside a primary head. 5)Original Design – a different pattern that is created to showcase the content.

32 Headlines The PRIMARY HEADLINE relies on a SECONDARY HEADLINE to provide specific information.

33 Headlines KICKER: A short, single line secondary headline is placed above the primary headline.

34 Headlines WICKET: A detailed secondary headline is placed above the primary headline.

35 HAMMER: A detailed secondary headline is placed below the primary headline.

36 2 Headlines TRIPOD: The secondary headline is placed beside the primary headline.

37 Headlines WRITING effective headlines requires creativity, effort and attention to details. A SOLID UNDERSTANDING OF CONTENT RESULTS IN BETTER HEADLINES. WORD PLAY AND BRAINSTORMING ARE USEFUL STRATEGIES. GUIDELINES LEAD TO QUALITY AND CONSISTENCY.

38 Headlines BRAINSTORMING in teams of two or three makes generating a list of key words much easier. STEP ONE: List 10-15 key words that describe and relate to the story. car drive keys money gas cool style wheels color wrecks dates expensive friends insurance happy auto

39 Headlines STORYTELLING words have significance and relate to the topic of the spread. STEP TWO: Brainstorm rhymes for words with storytelling potential. car: star, far drive: alive, strive, five keys: please money: honey, bunny, funny gas: pass, mass cool: school, pool wheels: peals, steals, deals wrecks: decks, pecks dates: mates, plates friends: bends, spends happy: pappy, sappy auto: lotto, motto

40 Headlines More than a cute phrase, headlines employ creative LITERARY TECHNIQUES that relate to the content. STEP THREE: Craft words and phrases that creatively capture the story. car: star, far star wars = car wars once upon a star = once upon a car carpe diem = CARpe diem auto: lotto, motto AUTOmotives wheels: peals, steals, deals the wheel deal keys: please pretty please = pretty keys

41 Headlines Headlines with strong VISUAL appeal communicate more effectively. GRAPHIC DETAILS MAKE PRIMARY HEADS POP AND CREATE HEADLINE PACKAGES. CAPITALIZATION STYLES CREATE A VARIETY OF LOOKS.

42 Headlines RHYME: The secondary headline provides specifics to support the catchy primary headline.

43 Headlines PUN: A creative primary headline establishes the angle for the story. The secondary adds specifics.

44 Headlines An ACRONYM is given a new meaning. Acronyms add specifics to the secondary headline.

45 Literary Techniques Alliteration – the repetition of a same or similar initial consonant sound. For example: four fun Fridays Assonance – the repetition of a same or similar vowel sound. For example: stop hopping frogs Oxymoron – combining contradictory terms. For example: jumbo shrimp, organized chaos ______________– a word of opposite meaning For example: dark/bright, excite/bore Cliche – common word or phrase, often a figure of speech. For example: that’s the way the cookie crumbles. Homonym – words that sound alike but mean different things. For example: one, won ___________________the use of sound to echo word meaning. For example: calp, bang, burr Pun – play on words based on multiple meanings. For example: the time on the plane flew by Rhyme – repetition of vowel sounds in accented syllables. For example: cash, trash Synonym- words of similar meaning. For example: vacation, trip.

46 Guidelines lead to quality and consistency: Use the following: 1)Present tense: is used for headlines to imply immediacy. A secondary head might be written in past tense because it contains factual background information. 2)Strong, active verbs: add more punch than weak, passive verbs. 3)Specific descriptive nouns: add more than general, vague nouns. 4)Articles are omitted: generally in primary headlines. Sometimes a, an and the are also left out in secondary headings. 5)A comma, is used instead of “and” in a series to save space. 6)Careful line breaks ensure that subjects and verbs or first and last names are not split between lines. Also, phrases or words that belong together should not be split. A proposition should not end a line of a headline.

47 How to make headings pop out on the page - Use larger display type from 24-200 point (primary headlines) the most popular 36-60 point, and 14-18 point for (secondary headlines) -Blend types of fonts, faces, sizes, alignments, spacing and capitalization magnifies headings - Lines and boxes attract attention and unify an idea. - Spot colour highlights key thoughts - Photos and art illustrate headline idea and invite readers into story content. - Electronic enhancements add dimension to a headline. -All caps can be powerful for primary headlines -All small caps similar to all caps, offers more variety with large and small capital letters. -Caps and lower case present themselves as a more formal approach -All lower case is a very informal style.

48 Day 7: Captions MODULE 12: CAPTIONS

49 Captions A caption’s __________ combines with a photograph to tell a story. CAPTIONS SHOULD DO MORE THAN STATE THE OBVIOUS. CAPTIONS ANSWER READERS’ QUESTIONS ABOUT A PHOTO. CAPTION WRITING REQUIRES REPORTING. QUOTES FROM INDIVIDUALS IN THE PHOTO ADD DEPTH.

50 Captions Gather INFORMATION about the photograph, answering the 5 W’s and H. STEP ONE who: Junior Travis Wilson, competitive wakeboarder what: spent a week practicing for competitions while on a family vacation when: vacation, last week of June, competition in July why: for fun and to improve on last year’s second place how: practice paid off with a first place medal at the Junior X Series Wakeboarding Championship.

51 Captions To write a SUMMARY CAPTION, write a sentence in present tense explaining the photo. STEP TWO During an annual family vacation in June at Lake Powell, junior Travis Wilson practices for the upcoming Junior X Series Wakeboarding Championship.

52 Captions For an EXPANDED CAPTION write additional sentences providing relevant information and a quote. STEP TWO During an annual family vacation in June at Lake Powell, junior Travis Wilson practices for the upcoming Junior X Series Wakeboarding Championship. His efforts were rewarded with a first place medal. “I live for wakeboarding. It’s an awesome way to push yourself to the limit. My favorite trick is called a tantrum, which is a true back flip.”

53 Captions Brainstorm a list of attention-getting impact words; select the best option for the caption LEAD-IN. STEP THREE determination airborne in the air “boardum” water and air concentration up and away concentration surf the wake

54 Captions The __________ of a caption varies with its function. CAPTION FORMATS RANGE FROM IDENTIFICATIONS TO MINI-STORIES. SPORTS CAPTIONS REQUIRE SPECIFIC DETAILS AND UNDERSTANDING. ONE TYPE OF CAPTION SHOULD BE AVOIDED.

55 Caption Formats Ident: Identifies individuals or group and offers a brief explanation of the photo content. __________Caption: highlights the most important w’s and h. Quote Caption: Provides insight and information through the words of the subject of the photo or someone closely related to the activity. _____________Caption: answers the five w’s and h and provides additional details, often direct quotes from individuals pictured. Group Identification: identifies groups as well as the individual members by first and last names, beginning with front or bottom row, and continuing to back or top row. __________Captions: Consists of 2 parts. One caption serves as an overview of all photos in the grouping, giving information and insights relevant to all. The second identifies or briefly describes each individual photo. *For sport captions always consult the coach for an edit and clarification*

56 Captions A caption’s DESIGN works with its content to draw readers. A LEAD-IN SERVES AS A MINI-HEADLINE FOR A CAPTION. THE FIRST SENTENCE INDENTIFIES INDIVIDUALS AND EXPLAINS WHAT IS HAPPENING. A SECOND SENTENCE ADDS INFORMATION AND INSIGHTS. WRITING A CAPTION IS LIKE WRITING A POEM; EACH WORD COUNTS.

57 Captions Use TYPOGRAPHIC TECHNIQUES to emphasize the caption lead-in.

58 MODULE 13: EDITING Day 7: Editing

59 Editing The collaboration of writer and editor improves CONTENT. WHEN EDITOR AND WRITER WORK TOGETHER FROM THE BEGINNING, CONTENT IMPROVES. WRITERS MUST EDIT THEIR OWN WORK. EDITORS SHOULD TRY TO HELP THE WRITER, NOT JUST IMPROVE THE STORY.

60 Editing Editing for __________ establishes credibility for readers. NAMES AND OTHER FACTS MUST BE CHECKED. SPELLING, GRAMMAR, PUNCTUATION, SENTENCE STRUCTURE – ALL MUST BE CORRECT. A MANUAL SPELLS OUT THE RULES EVERYONE ON STAFF SHOULD FOLLOW.

61 Editing Editing for STYLE establishes consistency. GUIDELINES IMPROVE WRITING THROUGHOUT THE YEARBOOK. EDITING GOES BEYOND PROOFREADING. RESOURCES PROVIDE HELP WITH EDITING.


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