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October 8, 2009. Overview Staffing Staffing Enrollment Enrollment Building Capacity Building Capacity Nurses Nurses.

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Presentation on theme: "October 8, 2009. Overview Staffing Staffing Enrollment Enrollment Building Capacity Building Capacity Nurses Nurses."— Presentation transcript:

1 October 8, 2009

2 Overview Staffing Staffing Enrollment Enrollment Building Capacity Building Capacity Nurses Nurses

3 KINDERGATEN , ,566 (461) ,135 (7,431) ,574 (4,561) ,029 (1,545) ,433 (596) The total number of students lost since school session is 14,594. If Pre-K is used the difference between enrollment this year and last year is 366 students.

4 STUDENT/TEACHER RATIO Elementary Total of 790 classes 56 (7%) classes above desirable Middle No concerns Senior High No concerns Pupils (26,574)/Teacher (1,854) ratio is 14.3 Elementary school (917) teacher /pupil ratio1: 15 Middle school (357) teacher/pupil ratio1: 12 Senior High school teacher (660) /pupil ratio 1: 13 Total teacher/student ratio is 1: 14

5 SURPLUS Special Education teachers 27 teacher positions will be reassigned or eliminated VACANCIES Teachers-Regular and (Title) Elementary 43 (9) Middle 9 (2) Senior 20 (2) Total teacher vacancies 72 (13) totals 167 Non Certified staff 18

6 DECISION The decision to reduce nurses was made last year as part of our reduction in force and was addressed in our budget presentation. The reduction didnt occur on June 30, 2009 because we were still in negotiations with the nurses union, and our desire to allow for maximum input into the decision. The approved FY budget was based on a projected student enrollment of 24,954. Based on one of our information meetings early in FY , we used a staffing ratio of 750 students per nurse. The ratio generated a recommendation of 33 nurses which was changed to 42. The original number of proposed nurse reductions was 23. After extensive discussion with Ms. Richelle Clark, Executive Director and Dr. Chip Jones, Deputy Superintendent of Student Support the number was changed to 15.

7 BUILDING CAPICITY Elementary Schools (47) at 75% capacity Five schools have enrollment at less than 50% capacity Six schools have enrollment at 100% or more capacity Middle Schools (12) at 58% capacity Three schools have enrollment at less than 50% capacity One school have enrollment at more than 75% capacity Senior High (14) at 58% capacity Five schools have enrollment at less than 50% capacity Two schools have enrollment at more than 75% capacity

8 FACTS Number of regular nurses was 67 (2 were on leave) and the number of substitute nurses was 4. They serviced 84 school sites. 12 nurses shared sites and 53 were assigned to one school. 2 substitutes were assigned to a school (August 20) Number of regular nurses was 65 and the number of substitute nurses was 4. They serviced 76 school sites. 11 nurses shared a site and 54 were assigned to one site. No substitutes were assigned to a school. Present Number of regular nurses is 50 and number of substitute nurses is 4. They service 76 school sites. 23 nurses share sites and 27 are assigned to one site. No substitutes are assigned to a school. Board Policy states that a nurse should be assigned based on the ratio of elementary, Middle, and 1- 1,000 HS and that a full-time nurse be assigned to a school site that has the majority of its students with Individual Evaluation Plans. The ratio is being followed in the present allocation of nurses.

9 PLAN Increase the number of substitute nurses from 4 to a maximum of 10 and utilize the nurses as needed. Continue to monitor student health needs and health risk and make adjustments to the staff as needed to meet the need. Partner with local universities to identify nurse interns to assist with school health needs. One meeting has been held with Washington University and SLU.

10 H1N1 VIRUS The nurse performs 4 functions as it relates to the virus. They are as follows: Assess the staff/students. They can provide over the counter medicine with the parent permission. Recording weekly number of students sent home with symptoms and report to City Health Department Educate student family and staff related to influenza Assess returning student The only thing that cant be performed by other staff is the dispensing of over the counter medicine.

11 The federal government, through the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) has provided H1N1 vaccine and grant funds to public health departments to immunize children in the school setting. The City of St. Louis Department of Health is collaborating with SLPS to plan and implement school- located 2009 H1N1 influenza vaccination clinics in all of it's school buildings where students are currently enrolled. The Medical Director for SLPS is also intricately involved in the development of these vaccination clinics The H1N1 vaccine will be offered to all enrolled students, ages and provided to all whose parents/guardians sign and return the consent and history forms Receipt of H1N1 vaccine is on a voluntary basis; it is not a required vaccine for compliance with state standards H1N1 vaccine will also be offered to employees who fall in the priority groups-pregnant women, healthcare personnel, and anyone from 25 through 64 years of age with certain chronic medical conditions or a weakened immune system The City Health Department will provide funding for contractual support of services from mass vaccinator agencies to provide all supplies and emergency medications, as well as, human resources to conduct the clinics The SLPS school nurses would be critical as the liaison with the mass vaccinator agency to make preparations for the clinics and implementation We anticipate SLPS clinics to begin around mid-November


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