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Empowering Youth through ICTs The World Links for Development program Michael Trucano, ICT for Education program, World Bank Institute.

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Presentation on theme: "Empowering Youth through ICTs The World Links for Development program Michael Trucano, ICT for Education program, World Bank Institute."— Presentation transcript:

1 Empowering Youth through ICTs The World Links for Development program Michael Trucano, ICT for Education program, World Bank Institute

2 Outline of todays presentation World Links: Program description Community outreach: Collaborative projects, school-based telecentres (Zimbabwe, Uganda, Laos), entrepreneurship Community impact and lessons learned: Teaching and learning, gender impact, telecentre sustainability

3 Program description

4 The World Links Program To improve & expand educational opportunities and horizons To prepare youth to develop skills to effectively enter a global economy based on knowledge and information To build bridges among the leaders of tomorrow -- bridging the digital divide. To improve & expand educational opportunities and horizons To prepare youth to develop skills to effectively enter a global economy based on knowledge and information To build bridges among the leaders of tomorrow -- bridging the digital divide. To catalyze the development of national ICT In Education initiatives

5 The New Global Economy Requires a New Global Education Everything Education Did Before, And More Basic Skills (literacy, numeracy, civics, etc.) –Greatest priority is STILL primary education, but it is not enough Information-Reasoning Skills for Life-long Learning and Productivity –gather, evaluate, analyze, synthesize, visualize and communicate information (dynamic knowledge) –problem solving, teamwork, communication skills, and ability to be flexible learner -- skills demanded by new economy. Global Knowledge and Outlook –Ability to work collaboratively across cultures, languages, time zones Digital Literacy - word processing, spreadsheets, Internet.

6 World Links Pilot Project Overview: programs in 22 developing countries Over 200,000 teachers and students, in over 1000 schools 22 partner countries hundreds of projects external evaluations Equity: more than 2/3 of schools are outside capital cities Challenge: To reach the most rural schools on a sustainable basis Botswana Burkina Faso GambiaGhana Mauritania Mozambique Senegal South Africa Uganda Zimbabwe BrazilChile Colombia Costa Rica El Salvador Paraguay Peru Palestine Turkey Sri Lanka TanzaniaRwanda

7 At its heart, World Links is a Professional Development (Training) Program For teachers: Teaching with technology (four 40-hour workshops over two years) For communities: Schools as Community Learning Centers For policymakers: ICTs in Education Strategies working in coordination with local NGOs

8 Collaborative Projects Examples: Environmental Awareness Women and Tradition Water Quality Project World Poverty Global Arts Project Outreach to Our Communities The Refugee Project The Impact of Industrialization on Development Science Review HIV/AIDS

9 World Links: NGO and World Links for Development Program in WBI World Links NGO Non-profit created in 1999, now responsible for 100% of resources and program delivery. –Focus on teacher training & e-learning World Bank Institute: ICT for Education program –Policy Makers Workshop for Staff and Clients. -- integration of ICT into Bank lending –Schools as Community Learning Centers (combined)

10 World Links in Asia World Links NGO taking lessons learned from pilot project and expanding to: –India –China –Sri Lanka –Philippines Pilipinas Schoolnet –Laos Jhai Foundation –soon: Vietnam, Cambodia, Indonesia with support from Japan Social Development Fund

11 Community outreach

12 School-based telecentres Zimbabwe and Uganda, Laos

13 School computer labs Schools responsibility –Staffing –Recurrent costs: electricity, phone/Internet, consumables (e.g., paper. toner)

14 This begs the question: How can participating schools fund recurrent costs?

15 Schools as Community Learning Centers Takes advantage of available resources Aggregates demand, enhances sustainability and school/community links Open for teachers and students during school hours, with a small monthly access fee Open for all community members during non- school hours (evenings, weekends, vacations) –about 180 days per year Enthusiastic reception by Ministries and school heads

16 School as Community Telecentre workshop 40 hr workshop with nine modules and worksheets General Introduction to Telecentre Movement Linking Schools and the Community Getting Organized – Operation Plans Knowing Your Clients Knowing Your Services Making it Work In Your Schools Spreading the Word Paying the Way – Financial Planning Knowing How Youre Doing Material is also relevant for non-school based sites

17 Zimbabwe-WorLD Case Study Schools and educational resource center telecenter sites established in 1999 School Decentralization –greater school autonomy/champion headmasters Cluster model –more than one school served by each site 43 dual-use centers –(9 resource centers, 33 school-based, 1 mobile van)

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19 Uganda Wireless Internet Pilot Support from WorLD, Gates Foundation and Schools Online 15 new school-based telecentre sites in rural areas with high-speed Internet connection –new computer labs –11 of these sites with VSAT satellite –4 connected to VSAT hub via spread spectrum –Fast Connection – 36 kps (up)/ 256 kps (down) Community Needs Survey in May 2001 Technical, Financial, Institutional, Educational Sustainability Schools working with full-time business plan developer Economies of Scale – US$400 US$50/month

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21 Wireless Pilot Objectives l Provide Access: Reach most rural areas in Uganda l Test Technology: Determine use and maintenance of VSAT technology l Financial Sustainability: Determine demand and willingness to pay l Push Regulatory environment: Licenses for rural wireless connectivity l Community impact: determine info services and impact on rural communities and increase school and community interaction. l Educational impact: benefits of rural connectivity on schools and for life long learning l Provide Access: Reach most rural areas in Uganda l Test Technology: Determine use and maintenance of VSAT technology l Financial Sustainability: Determine demand and willingness to pay l Push Regulatory environment: Licenses for rural wireless connectivity l Community impact: determine info services and impact on rural communities and increase school and community interaction. l Educational impact: benefits of rural connectivity on schools and for life long learning

22 Areas of Intervention Assessment and Evaluation –Awareness Raising, Site Assessement, Community Needs Survey, High Impact Knowledge Assessment, Impact Evaluation – To be delivered Technology Implementation –Computer Labs with LAN, Licensing Requirements for Wireless, VSAT and Spread Spectrum Training –Technical Training, Pedagogical Training, Management Training, Content and Usage Training, Evaluation and Lesson Sharing Workshop Content and Services –Tele-medicine, e-commerce, e-learning, NGO networking Coordination and Support –Schoolnet Uganda coordinator, Technical coordinator, and Community Learning Center specialist

23 Service Example: Tele- Medicine ( Linking Moroto Hospital to Mulago Hospital) Linking Hospitals in Moroto (worst health indicators) to Mulago for E- consultations – breaking down doctor isolation and reducing the referral cases from the district

24 Entrepreneurship

25 Youth Information Technology (YouthIT) (Microenterprise Project) Opportunity: Create new youth-led IT businesses for opportunities for in-and out-of-school youth in developing countries Co-sponsored project of: Altadena Rotary Club 5300 and other Clubs JA International and JA Country Programs World Links and Country Partners

26 Laos World Links working with Jhai Foundation Seven sites throughout the country Wireless connectivity, refurbished computers Schools as community telecentres Usage based on community needs: schools, local business, medicine

27 Impact and Lessons Learned

28 Impact Surveys SRI Survey - Evaluation Conducted in 12 WorLD countries ( , follow-up study underway) –Evaluation focused on implementation of program, differences between WorLD and non-WorLD schools, and impact on teachers and students Tracer Study - Uganda (2002) Gender Study – Senegal, Mauritania, Uganda, Ghana (Nov. 2001)

29 Impact of World Links Program on Teachers How to use Internet software How to develop web pages How to design and use student assessment materials How to design and lead collaborative student projects Attitudes about teaching How to integrate computers into the curriculum Percentage of Teachers Responding A Lot or A Great Deal Percentage of Teachers Responding A Lot or A Great Deal WL Teachers Source: SRI Study of World Links programs. Data is for illustrative purposes only, and does not represent all data points on questionnaire.

30 Impact of World Links Program on Students Improved attitudes towards technology Improved communications skills Improved knowledge or awareness of other cultures Improved school attendance Increased scores on national tests Improved ability to get better jobs upon graduation Percentage of Teachers Responding Large Impact or Great Impact Percentage of Teachers Responding Large Impact or Great Impact WL Teachers Source: SRI Study of World Links programs. Data is for illustrative purposes only, and does not represent all data points on questionnaire.

31 Gender impact

32 Gender Impact: Key Findings Same High Impact for boys and girls –Knowledge about other cultures –Attitudes towards school Higher Impact for Girls –Academic results –Information-reasoning –Self-esteem –Communication skills Higher Impact for Boys –Access to computers –Technological skills Our self-esteem has really improved because of the World Links program. Now we can rub shoulders with boys that want to step on our toes. We walk with our chests out! Anytime we are confronted with questions we feel confident answering, even with older people we come boldly! - Female World Links participant, Ghana Our self-esteem has really improved because of the World Links program. Now we can rub shoulders with boys that want to step on our toes. We walk with our chests out! Anytime we are confronted with questions we feel confident answering, even with older people we come boldly! - Female World Links participant, Ghana

33 Gender impact issues impacting equity of access While a majority of girls do not feel that access to technology is an issue for them (60-90%)…. high student to computer ratios and first-come- first serve computer lab policies disproportionately affect access issues for girls Curfews & chores Fair use policies Role models

34 Gender impact research on information considered taboo for girls is a major draw for girls accessing the Internet for academic work in World Links schools

35 Community impact

36 World Links Tracer Study World LinksControl Group RespondentsUniversity Are Computer Literate 100% 58% Have Taught Others Computer Skills80% 28% Use Computer Skills to Aid Studies100% 35% Are Pursuing a Degree Related to ICTs36% 13% Are Currently Employed in ICT Field17% 0% Are Planning a Career in the ICT Field43% 13% Females Pursuing an ICT Related Degree 24% 0% Females Pursuing an ICT Related Career 24% 0%

37 Community Impact Telecentre project Economic Development. –Tourist guides and small businessmen are using computers and the Internet in their day-to-day activities. –Telemedicine content and consultations developed. Life Long Learning. –More and more upcountry students and in-service teachers are enrolling for distance education courses in and outside Uganda. –Partnerships developing with educational institutions delivering distance education courses. Community interest in the School –Schools and community interaction has increased. Catalytic project for national rural communications development programs.

38 Lessons Learned Telecentres The Concept Works – Sustainability not yet proven Community Involvement essential –Needs survey to proceed all activities –Build ownership and involve in management –Head Teachers important Work with existing organization with existing user base Training, training, training Demand and ability to pay strong thus far but not certain Need to tailor content to meet community needs Choose open standards for Equipment Technology stable but need to build in replacement costs

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