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Lessons Learned from Jordans Experience in Large Scale Integration of ICTs into Secondary Education Sam Carlson World Bank May 28, 2009.

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Presentation on theme: "Lessons Learned from Jordans Experience in Large Scale Integration of ICTs into Secondary Education Sam Carlson World Bank May 28, 2009."— Presentation transcript:

1 Lessons Learned from Jordans Experience in Large Scale Integration of ICTs into Secondary Education Sam Carlson World Bank May 28, 2009

2 Lessons Learned from Jordan We have to be patient... it takes time. ICT can not fix a bad education system. It's NOT about purchasing computers to schools, but upgrading skills and knowledge of teachers. Education systems have to develop e-content materials... if there is no e-content developed it is like building roads without cars on the road. Change management at the school level is essential; involvement of school principal in training and all aspects of ICT integration is very important. HE Dr. Tayseer Al-Nahar, Minister of Education, April 2009

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4 Education Reform for the Knowledge Economy (ERFKE) Objective: reform entire school education system to produce graduates for the knowledge economy Launched in 2003

5 What Does a Knowledge Economy Require? A knowledge economy requires key basic skills and core competencies, as well as essential content. It also requires the following essential skills: critical thinking, problem solving, decision making, using numbers, communication skills, managing information, being responsive, learning continuously (lifelong learning), entrepreneurship, adaptability, teamwork, innovation and creativity. When ERFKE program began in 2003, the Jordanian school curriculum focused primarily on subject matter content (math, language, history, etc.), not all of it relevant or essential for a knowledge economy. –Sound familiar?

6 Key Performance Indicators A redefined vision and integrated education strategy, with policies and regulations aligned with the new vision and strategy. The average standardized score of Jordanian students in international assessments of mathematics and science will improve. At least 80 percent of the primary and secondary students will have access to safe and adequate basic and secondary education school facilities. At least 70 percent of basic and secondary students will be using on-line learning portals.

7 ERKE Program Components Component 1: Redefine the vision and associated policy objectives of the educational system, that will enable the required transformation to meet the emerging needs of the knowledge economy. Component 2: Transform teaching and learning processes in order to achieve learning outcomes that are consistent with the requirements of the knowledge economy. –(i) develop of new curriculum and enhanced leaming assessment; –(ii) ensure professional development of MOE personnel; and –(iii) provide required resources to support effective learning. Component 3, Ensure adequate provision of safe and improved learning environments, including provision of computer and science labs.

8 Curriculum and Examinations Reform –Curriculum for Grades 1-12, completely redesigned to emphasize development of knowledge economy skills, not recall of facts. –New examinations (grades 3, 6 and 9) which measure knowledge economy skills, not facts.

9 Teacher Training: Pre-Service, In- Service and On-Service Introduction/understanding of new curricula and knowledge economy skills Understanding/practice of new teacher roles as facilitators and guides to student learning Develop skills and knowledge for effective use of ICTs in the classroom

10 Learning Resources Computer and Science laboratories Textbooks, workbooks, exercise books Software E-content ICT equipment, software, tech support Connectivity E-Learning Portal

11 Required Reform, not just Investment This approach called for systemic reform, rather than piecemeal solutions or simply more money. Institutional reforms such as: –Changes in the regulatory and procedural frameworks –Revised organizational structures and employment incentive systems (e.g., teacher classification, certification, supervision, upgrading, reward, recognition and promotion) –Realignment of vertical and horizontal governance and management structures and processes

12 Governance of Secondary Education Changed from highly centralized management processes to the gradual devolution of responsibility and accountability to the district and school level. Redistributed responsibility among the central, regional, local authorities and schools (e.g., redefined the roles and functions at each level as to who would be responsible for each level of decision- making and financial authority). Required a major attitudinal shift to achieve the change envisioned and to do things differently. The use of participatory approaches in designing new governance and management structures and decision-making processes is essential to engage, enable and empower stakeholders.

13 2006 – Mid-Term Review of Results of ERFKE Program

14 Curriculum and Learning Assessment Development Expected Outputs: Curricula developed in outcomes-based format for all subjects and grades, in order to build graduate skills necessary for effective participation in the knowledge economy. Each curricula is supplemented by a learning assessment framework. Learning content has been developed and textbooks produced. The new curricula and learning assessment tools are in use throughout the system.

15 Curriculum Reform: Results An outcomes-based General Curriculum and Learning Assessment Framework was developed, relevant to the demands of a knowledge economy. The Framework, together with subject-specific frameworks, was subsequently subjected to a broadly based review process including MOE field directorates and universities. Revisions were incorporated into a final document that was approved by the Board of Education. Specific learning outcomes were developed to guide textbook preparation for all subjects. Curriculum frameworks have been completed for all subjects, grades All the foregoing work has been accomplished in accordance with best international practice.

16 Learning Assessment: Results General Curriculum and Learning Assessment Framework and specific subject frameworks (23) have been approved. Examples of classroom assessment techniques for different (23) subject areas have been published and distributed. Teachers in grades 1, 4, 8 and 10 have been issued with guides to help them complete student reports. National Assessments, in alignment with The International Math and Sciences Survey (TIMSS). have been developed for Grades 4, 8 and 10.

17 Big Issue: The Tawjihi! Equivalent to Class 12 Board Examination: This terminal examination remains the gold standard in terms of educational achievement for many. Altering the Tawjihi to reflect changes in curriculum, pedagogy and assessment in grades is a big challenge and faces opposition. Need to gradually increase the proportion of items measuring higher-order thinking skills in the Tawjihi, to make it more consistent with the emphasis on knowledge economy skills. Teachers and students need to be given samples of the different types of higher order thinking skills so they become accustomed to the new format. Given the significant status of the Tawjihi, rapid changes may be counter-productive and produce a backlash that could undermine efforts to improve the nature of teaching and learning sought by ERFKE. Gradual change in examination format is likely to be more acceptable to educational stakeholders.

18 Teacher Training Expected Output: All teachers, principals and administrators have been oriented towards the structure and purpose underlying the new curricula. Training has been provided in teaching, and learning assessment strategies associated with delivery of the new curricula, together with training in the use of ICT as a tool to enhance the achievement of learning outcomes.

19 Teacher Training: Results ICT training has reached almost every teacher in the system, with significant numbers moving beyond basic computer literacy courses to higher level ICT programs. 75% of teachers have received training on the General Curriculum and Learning Assessment Framework, with many participating in training on subject-specific curricula, teacher competencies and teacher standards. Steady progress in the contents and methods of training, with a detectable shift in training styles and approaches among trainers that model the pedagogical assumptions and strategies of the new curriculum framework. Shift from traditional cascade training to peer learning, self instruction, and school-based training via School Development Units (SDUs).

20 Teacher Training Results (cont.) Extensive technical assistance has supported this process, and key documents, such as the Training Handbook, the Teacher Standards and Competencies, serve as useful tools for trainers. Progress in the transformation of pre-service teacher education has been slower, but closer collaboration between MOE and the universities is evident and beginning to have an impact. Accelerating the shift in focus from ICT training to e-Teaching and e-Learning is a critical step to sustain the interest in the use of ICT by teachers.

21 Learning Resources Expected Output: All schools have been provided with the learning resources necessary to achieve the outcomes specified in the new curricula. This includes textbooks, laboratory equipment, ICT connectivity, computer labs with software applications and learning content.

22 Learning Resources: Results Significant progress has been made in the provision of ICT resources to schools, mostly in the form of networked computer labs. Most schools have local area networks, as well as having administrative offices and teacher lounges networked. Notebooks and LCD projectors have been provided to model schools, to be used directly in classrooms to aid in the delivery of the newly developed e-content. Thin-client computing systems have been deployed as pilot alternatives to traditional lab set-up.

23 Learning Resources: Results EduWave e-Learning Platform operational, to which all teachers have access. e-Content developed in Math, English, Science, Arabic, Civics, ICT, and Administration, consistent with MOE curriculum (3,373 e-learning lessons) National Broadband Network to reach all schools with 100Mbps, although many still using high-speed DSL network.

24 Learning Outcomes SubjectIntl Average OECD Average Jordan Average Model ICT Schools Non Model Schools Math Science Reading On average, Model ICT Schools performed 5% better than the average Jordan school, and 8% better than non-Model ICT Schools. Learning Outcomes based on the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA).

25 Next Steps It is now critical that MOE conduct a thorough investigation of the impact of all learning resource investments on the learning and teaching process, as well as on the administrative functions of schools, directorates, and the MOE at-large.

26 Lessons Learned from Jordan We have to be patient... it takes time. ICT can not fix a bad education system. It's NOT about purchasing computers to schools, but upgrading skills and knowledge of teachers. Education systems have to develop e-content materials... if there is no e-content developed it is like building roads without cars on the road. Change management at the school level is essential; involvement of school principal in training and all aspects of ICT integration is very important. HE Dr. Tayseer Al-Nahar, Minister of Education, April 2009


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