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Approach to Sustainable Peace, Livelihood and Social Protection.

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Presentation on theme: "Approach to Sustainable Peace, Livelihood and Social Protection."— Presentation transcript:

1 Approach to Sustainable Peace, Livelihood and Social Protection

2 I would like to extend The Government of Sudans gratitude to the Donors community for the continuous support for peace, humanitarian assistance and Development, we are looking forward for more assistance as we are now moving from relief to repatriation and rehabilitation and development From the past experience we have encountered many short falls and impediments in the areas of 1.Return 2.Mine Action 3.DDR These shortfalls are many attributable to lack of effective Reintegration Programs of basic services at the reception areas,

3 RETURN The preparation for the return of IDPs in effect had started before the signature of CPA ( The Policy Frame Work Agreement July 2002) The Government of Sudan, Government of Southern Sudan,UN, Donors and International NGOs agreed to join the efforts for return, consequently the following mechanisms were established 1.Policy Committee 2.Technical Committee 3.Task Force

4 RETURN The Organized Return started early 2005 as a joint activity between The Government and UN and other Partners The Return of IDPs was based on two Surveys in 2005 and 2006 to identify the wish for voluntary return among IDPs, the surveys indicated the following findings: 70% wished to return 20% wished to stay at the hosting communities 10% did not make a decision

5 RETURN Donors The Number of Returnees ( Organized and Spontaneous) during the period was as follows Spontaneous Return 1,400,000 Organized Return,300,000 Refugees from neighbouring Countries,200,000 Total No. of Returnees Countries 1,900,000

6 OPPORTUNITIES The return was a good reflection of the successful implementation of the CPA, as the CPA was considered to be the corner stone reference for the right to return The joint efforts of the different partners resulted in a successful model of cooperation efficiently utilizing the available resources The International Community witnessed and appreciated the implementation of the CPA through this exercise

7 CHALLENGES Lack of basic services at the final destination Short Dry Season ( 4 Months ) hampered the transport of IDPs and Refugees, coupled with the poor conditions of existing roads The foregoing analysis indicate that for the return to take place effectively it will be very crucial to tackle the following major issues Mine Actions Provision of Basic Services, Humanitarian Intervention(early recover and livelihood ) at the final destination Reintegration Programs at the host communities Transport and Logistic facilities

8 Target Outcome BaselineKey Actions and Results Achievements ( ) 1.Formulation of Policy on Return of IDPs and Refugees based on CPA. 2.Assessment of The General Situation of IDPs in Sudan and Refugees in the neighbouring countries. 1.Development of Mechanisms that will care for policies implementation 2.Establishment of Major Partners 1 Preparation of The Master Joint Plan for the Return of the IDPs and Refugees 2. Target Figures for the Return were agreed upon among the Partners for the years as follows: , , ,000 IDPs and Refugees 1.Establishment of the Following Committees Policy Committee Technical Committee Task Force 2. Return of IDPs and Refugees as Follows : Spontaneous Return 1,400,000 Organized Return 300,000 Refugees from neighbouring 200,000 Total No. of Returnees 1,900, Partners Fulfilled their commitment as agreed in the Joint Plan Returns Progress Report ( )

9 Operational Priorities Baseline Dec Key actions and results Achievements Required Resources Continuation of the Return Program for IDPS and Refugees Organized Return of IDPs 190,000 Retufugees Spontaneous return: Logistics and Transport Reception at the final destination Reintegration Return and repatriation of 2,100,000 IDPs and refugees 1 Annual Organized return for 500 IDPs and refugees for the first three years 2 Organized return for 300 IDPs and refugees in the Fourth year 3 Reception of (spontaneous and organized return 160 M $ (40 $ millions annually) Rehabilitation of Final Destination s for Return Social Services facilities are quantitatively and qualitatively poor Water, Health, Education, Livelihood and Food security Provision of conducive environment for long term reintegration through provision of basic services and economic activities to meet the needs of the 4,000,000 returnees, (current and planned returnees) and their host community members 150 M $ Rehabilitation of River Transport, Railways and Roads Nill Construction of 1000 Klm. Rehabilitation of 5 Barges Rehabilitation of Babanusa Wau Railway Improvement of Transport Facilities for Return 350 M $ Return and Repatriation Programme Planned Activities ( )

10 Mine Action Mine actions are considered to be as very crucial for return, as it paves the way for returnees to resume their normal life, as well as encouraging economic and social development through free movements of population, goods and services and most importantly giving support for mines victims

11 Target Objectives Key actions and results Achievements Clearance of mine/ERW and survey operations in high priority areas jointly determined by national authorities and the UN Emergency route survey and route verification/clearance of all secondary suspected/mined roads to facilitate free and safe movement of the UN Peace Support Mission personnel, returnees, and reconstruction and development projects. Total road cleared 2414 and assessed 19,050 totaling to km by (Increased freedom of movement to facilitate sate return of IDPs and refugees, distribution of emergency relief, and monitoring of the implementation of the CPA, In the South, a ring road linking major towns and linking up to then north is almost complete. Now possible to drive from Aweil-wau-Rumbek-Juba-Bor- 50% to Malakal completed. Domestic and International trade recommenced with opening of roads) Clearance of high priority suspected/mined areas to release land and facilities for productive use Mine field clearance of 5,637,786 and Battle field of 28,480,786 sqm achieved. Technical survey of all high priority reported dangerous areas define boundaries of minefields and to reduce suspected areas. Land mine Impact survey completed in Eastern Equatorial, Northern Bahr Al Ghazal and Kassala. 2. Continue to provide Mine Risk education to communities at risk on priority basis Provision of mine risk education to communities at risk. 6,000 teachers and community workers trained as MRE TOT 1856,610 persons received MRE. Formulation and implementation of a mine risk education to support the National Mine Action strategic framework. Integration of mine risk education and community liaison activities into other mine action operations/activities Mine Action

12 4. Strengthen and expand the existing national capacities to ensure physical, psycho-social and economic rehabilitation and reintegration of mine/ERW victims and survivors: Build the Capacity of National Institutions to manage Mines/ERW problem. A comprehensive nation-wide surveillance system established to collect data and measure progress achieved in Victims assistance. Two coordination working groups established in Khartoum and Juba to improve coordination, technical knowledge and capacity A comprehensive mine/ERW victim database established and maintained by NMACs, victim assistance organisations and donors 96 health staff trained in mine victims data collection in S Kordofan NMACs initiated the Integration of Landmine/ERW victim assistance program into the national health and social welfare system. Implementation of needs assessment for physical, social and economic rehabilitation and reintegration of mine/ERW victims ongoing. National VA strategic framework and work plan developed in National NGOs have received UNDP funding for VA projects 5. Strengthen and expand the existing national mine action institutional framework to be able to plan, implement, coordinate and monitor all aspects of mine action Recruitment of key staff in the National Mine Action centres. Key staff recruited in mine action centres in Khartoum and Juba, (Operations, Quality Assurance, Information Management, MRE/Victim Assistance) UNDP supported National authorities by equipping NMAC offices with facilities and equipments The National Mine Action staff received training in explosive ordinance disposal, management, QC, support services and IMSMA internally and externally NMAC and SSDC held monthly coordination meetings and Participated in the development of the Sudan Portfolio and UN Work Plan for Sudan NMACs recruited and trained Information Management staff in Khartoum, Juba to manage the Information system. NMACs obtained GIS license from the (GIS) for Information Management System and obtained IT equipments for Mine Action (IMSMA). Establishment of an effective national mine action coordination mechanism by involving National partners in all levels of planning and prioritization as part of training and ownership. Two Joint Integrated Deming Units (JIDU) trained and deployed. Each with 120 men. UNMAO and NMACs accredited 5 NGOs to conduct mine action operations 2 NGOs, NMMAS and SIMAS accredited and conducting clearance operations. Support for National NGOs conducting MRE and VA activities. Mine Action

13 Operational Priorities Baseline Dec Key actions and results Planned Achievements Required Resources 1. Continue to undertake mine/ERW clearance and survey operations in high priority areas jointly determined by national authorities and the UN The total road clearance by 2007 was 2,414 km. (N-1765 S- 650km) Complete emergency route survey and route verification/clearan ce of all secondary suspected/mined roads. 4500kms km earmarked as high priority road to be cleared by end of 2011 USD 76.0 Millions estimated to cover annual costs for UNMAO activities Clear high priority suspected/mined areas with an annual rate of about 3.5 Million Sqm to release land and facilities for productive use Clear 200,000 Sqm Battle ground in Blue Nile. Clearance of 686,400sqm North and 2500,000 Sqm South of high impact minefields. Complete Landmine Impact survey. Survey completed for 99 tasks Road survey and verification 1,329 North and South 5000km Complete landmine Impact survey in 7 southern Sudan States. 2. Continue to provide Mine Risk education to communities at risk on priority basis 1,544 teachers and community workers trained as TOTs in MRE in 2007, (N-940,S-469,D- 135) Utilizing the available MRE resources, continue to provide Emergency and targeted Mine risk education to communities at risk. Provide MRE to 550,000 IDPs, refugees and mine/ERW affected communities. 6,000 teachers and community workers provided with MRE TOT and training materials by Provide Landmine safety training and briefing to 3000 UN and Aid agencies personnel. Integrated MRE into the education and health systems in mine affected states by December 2010 PLANNED ACTIVITIES

14 3. Strengthen and expand the existing national capacities to ensure physical, psycho-social and economic rehabilitation and reintegration of mine/ERW victims and survivors: According to the IMSMA Data base (Dec. 2007) the total number of mine/ERW survivors identified is 4,031(N-1373, S-2603,D-67) Support the reintegration of Mines/ERW victims Increase technical knowledge of partners on VA and disability related issues Organize needs assessment to update IMSMA victim assistance database Mid term review of the national VA work plan Provide support to 500 mine/ERW survivors in terms of social reintegration and economic empowerment 4. Strengthen and expand the existing national mine action institutional framework to be able to plan, implement, coordinate and monitor all aspects of mine action Continue to build the capacity of National institutions for transition. UNDP to support National authorities with facilities and equipments. Support the establishment of field 3 offices in the South Yei, Malakal, and Wau. Strengthen management capacity of NMAC and SSDC through organized local and international trainings. Strengthen links between mine action and reconstruction and development projects. Continue to deploy 110 national deminers for the verification and Mine/ERW clearance of high priority areas. Support NMA and SSDC to equip, accredit and field deploy additional 120 trained national deminers for verification and clearance of high priority areas Support transition to national authorities by organizing a planning workshop, development of Transitional Plan with National Authorities 5 more NGOs to be accredited by the end of the planning period UNMAO to assist the development of National institutions to manage landmine/ERW threat. PLANNED ACTIVITIES

15 Remarks In conclusion this cluster had never been financed through MDTF. The Return programs for IDPs are financed through CHF, in addition to the financial contributions of GNU and GOSS In the forth coming Consortium we hope for considerable contribution for this cluster as the donors priority at present is funding reintegration programs in the South and the three areas, hence the return operations will be left lacking the necessary funds


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