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Internet Investigations Team B: Kristy Deeser Nina Doutt Roger Elder Designing and Conducting Successful Web Quests.

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Presentation on theme: "Internet Investigations Team B: Kristy Deeser Nina Doutt Roger Elder Designing and Conducting Successful Web Quests."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Internet Investigations Team B: Kristy Deeser Nina Doutt Roger Elder Designing and Conducting Successful Web Quests.

3 A Web Quest is... A project that requires students to locate information via the Internet. An investigative tool that can be used to research a variety of topics.

4 Web Quests... Are designed by the instructor to accomplish curricular objectives. Can be designed for elementary, middle, and high school students. Are capable of being utilized in any content area.

5 Curricular benefits of teaching with Web Quests: Allows students to utilize technology in the learning process. Allows students to locate up to date information.

6 Web Quests also enhance the curriculum by... Allowing students to work individually or collectively on a learning team. Providing students with an enjoyable yet meaningful research assignment.

7 Web Quests are beneficial because... They allow students to use a variety of technology skills while they learn. They assess students understanding of a topic without the aid of pencil and paper.

8 Web Quests also benefit teachers by... Allowing teachers to add fun and creative projects to the curriculum. Accommodating students various learning styles and needs.

9 WARNING! Before starting a Web Quest... The teacher should first be comfortable with such basic computer operations as: Connecting to the Internet. Navigating by using Internet search engines.

10 Other Important Technology Skills Teachers need to know how to bookmark useful web sites. Teachers must understand how to place web sites into their favorite file.

11 Creating a Web Quest

12 The Introduction... The introduction is designed to hook the reader and prepare him or her for the lesson. The student is the intended audience for a Web Quest.

13 Web Quests need a Motivating Introduction. Write a short paragraph or activity setting the stage to introduce the lesson. Introduce the big question that the Web Quest is centered around.

14 An Example of an Introduction: You are a detective working for the RAECO Detective Agency. One morning a stranger asks you to help him discover the identity of a strange orange substance.

15 The Task... The task helps the learner focus on what needs to be done. The task drives the Web Quests learning activities.

16 The task needs to be focused! Specifically detail what the end result of the learners activities will be. Dont list the steps in this part. That comes later!

17 An example of a task: Imagine you are a shark, and that you can communicate with people. What could you write in a letter arguing why you should be allowed to live?

18 The Process... This portion outlines how the learner will complete the quest. The scaffolding for this part includes clear steps, appropriate resources, and the correct tools for organizing the activity.

19 The steps for the process cant be ambiguous! The learner needs to be able to access the online resources found in the quest. Consider adding helps that enable the learner to organize the information such as worksheets or graphic organizers.

20 An example of the process: You and your team will read a description of several different types of maps. Afterwards you will use the information to make a decision about where the best location for your farm would be.

21 The Evaluation... This part of the assignment describes how the students will be graded on their quest. The assessment rubric should be aligned to the web quests stated task. Inform students whether they will receive a team grade or an individual grade. A+

22 An example of an evaluation: You will be evaluated on your participation, your notes from your brainstorming session, the concept map you created, and your team poster. Super Job!

23 The Conclusion... The conclusion brings closure to the Web Quest and encourages students to reflect on the learning activity. What I learned…

24 The conclusion serves as a wind-up for the Web Quest! Summarize what the students should have learned by completing the quest. Ask a few rhetorical questions or provide URL links to extend students learning.

25 An example of a conclusion: Youve done an excellent job learning about the Great Lakes. Its now time to head for shore. Remember, fresh water is important for a number of reasons...

26 The Teacher Page This section provides other teachers with notes for teaching this Web Quest. It may include the type of learners targeted, usage notes, standards and benchmarks, other Internet resources, and samples of student work. Worlds Best Teacher

27 Links that show examples used in a teachers page... Learners - sessions/westwardho/t- learners.htm Standards - grant/enigmas/t-standards.htm Teacher Notes - montgomery/mysteriousmasks/t- process.htm Student Work - grant/intertidal/t-process.htm I survived my first Web Quest!

28 Web Quest Resources: The WebQuest Page at San Diego State University. Sample WebQuest Lessons: Encouraging the Use of Technology in the Classroom: The WebQuest Connection. cles/stinson/ Education Week: Creating a WebQuest: Its Easier Than You Think! world.com/a_tech/tech011.shtml

29 Web Quest Resources: Education Week: Creating a WebQuest: Its Easier Than You Think! Encouraging the Use of Technology in the Classroom: The WebQuest Connection. s/stinson/ Sample WebQuest Lessons:

30 Sample Web Quest greentown/baseball/baseball.htmhttp://www.northcanton.sparcc.org/~ greentown/baseball/baseball.htm


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