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© 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Which country took the lead in exploration in the fifteenth century? 1.Portugal 2.Spain 3.England 4.France 10.01 Q.

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Presentation on theme: "© 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Which country took the lead in exploration in the fifteenth century? 1.Portugal 2.Spain 3.England 4.France 10.01 Q."— Presentation transcript:

1 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Which country took the lead in exploration in the fifteenth century? 1.Portugal 2.Spain 3.England 4.France Q

2 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Which country took the lead in exploration in the fifteenth century? 1.Portugal 2.Spain 3.England 4.France A

3 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: Which country took the lead in exploration in the fifteenth century? 1.Portugal In 1415, Prince Henry the Navigator, brother of the king of Portugal, captured a North African Muslim city thus beginning Portuguese exploration of the African coast E

4 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Renaissance society first took on its distinctive shape in the: 1.merchant cities of Italy 2.city-states of southern France 3.papal states 4.principalities of northern Germany Q

5 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Renaissance society first took on its distinctive shape in the: 1.merchant cities of Italy 2.city-states of southern France 3.papal states 4.principalities of northern Germany A

6 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: Renaissance society first took on its distinctive shape in the: 1.merchant cities of Italy Constant warfare between pro-papal and pro- imperial factions allowed cities to escape dominance by kings and popes, take charge of the regions in which they were located, and become self-governing city-states E

7 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. During much of the fifteenth century, the Medici family dominated: 1.Naples 2.Milan 3.Venice 4.Florence Q

8 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. During much of the fifteenth century, the Medici family dominated: 1.Naples 2.Milan 3.Venice 4.Florence A

9 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: During much of the fifteenth century, the Medici family dominated: 4.Florence Cosimo de Medici and his son, Lorenzo the Magnificent, dominated Florentine affairs from 1434 to E

10 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Who was the father of humanism? 1.Giotto 2.Boccaccio 3.Dante 4.Petrarch Q

11 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Who was the father of humanism? 1.Giotto 2.Boccaccio 3.Dante 4.Petrarch A

12 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: Who was the father of humanism? 4.Petrarch Francesco Petrarch modeled his writing on the works of the giants of Roman literature. He is known as the father of humanism E

13 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Pico della Mirandola was heavily influenced by: 1.Cicero 2.Aristotle 3.Plato 4.Livy Q

14 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Pico della Mirandola was heavily influenced by: 1.Cicero 2.Aristotle 3.Plato 4.Livy A

15 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: Pico della Mirandola was heavily influenced by: 3.Plato Cosimo de Medici founded the Platonic Academy which was later headed by Pico della Mirandola E

16 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. One of Raphaels most important masterpieces is: 1.The Virgin of the Rocks 2.The Pieta 3.The School of Athens 4.The Death of Saint Michael Q

17 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. One of Raphaels most important masterpieces is: 1.The Virgin of the Rocks 2.The Pieta 3.The School of Athens 4.The Death of Saint Michael A

18 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: One of Raphaels most important masterpieces is: 3.The School of Athens Art historians consider Raphaels fresco, The School of Athens, a group portrait of the great Western philosophers, a perfect example of Renaissance technique E

19 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Slaves were imported into Italy from: 1.Africa 2.The Balkans 3.Constantinople 4.All of the above Q

20 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Slaves were imported into Italy from: 1.Africa 2.The Balkans 3.Constantinople 4.All of the above A

21 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: Slaves were imported into Italy from: 4.All of the above Slavery was not based on any concept of race and peoples from Africa, the Balkans, Constantinople, Cyprus, Crete, and the lands surrounding the Black Sea were enslaved E

22 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The balance of power was maintained in Italy in the second half of the fifteenth century by the: 1.Treaty of Lodi 2.Treaty of Paris 3.Treaty of Lucca 4.Treaty of Rome Q

23 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The balance of power was maintained in Italy in the second half of the fifteenth century by the: 1.Treaty of Lodi 2.Treaty of Paris 3.Treaty of Lucca 4.Treaty of Rome A

24 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: The balance of power was maintained in Italy in the second half of the fifteenth century by the: 1.Treaty of Lodi The Treaty of Lodi ( ) allied traditional enemies Milan and Naples with Florence against Venice and the Papal States and created a balance of power that helped stabilize Italy internally E

25 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. European monarchies began to create standing armies in the: 1.fourteenth century 2.fifteenth century 3.thirteenth century 4.sixteenth century Q

26 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. European monarchies began to create standing armies in the: 1.fourteenth century 2.fifteenth century 3.thirteenth century 4.sixteenth century A

27 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: European monarchies began to create standing armies in the: 2.fifteenth century By the fifteenth century, European monarchs had begun to create standing armies that ended the feudal nobilitys traditional military monopoly E

28 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Machiavelli hoped a strong ruler would emerge from the: 1.Sforza 2.Borgia 3.Medici 4.Guicciardini Q

29 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Machiavelli hoped a strong ruler would emerge from the: 1.Sforza 2.Borgia 3.Medici 4.Guicciardini A

30 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: Machiavelli hoped a strong ruler would emerge from the: 3.Medici Machiavelli believed that if Italians ceased their feuding and working together, they could defend their country from invaders. He hoped the Medici family might produce the leader Italy needed E

31 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Henry VII of England founded the: 1.Tudor dynasty 2.Stuart dynasty 3.House of York 4.Plantagenet dynasty Q

32 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Henry VII of England founded the: 1.Tudor dynasty 2.Stuart dynasty 3.House of York 4.Plantagenet dynasty A

33 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: Henry VII of England founded the: 1.Tudor dynasty Henry VII overthrew Richard III and then married Elizabeth of York, daughter of Edward VI, whose bloodline provided added legitimacy for the Tudor dynasty E

34 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Erasmus wanted to: 1.lead a revolt against the Catholic church 2.return Europe to the days of the Roman Empire 3.elevate the Classics above all other literature 4.unite Classical and Christian ideals Q

35 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Erasmus wanted to: 1.lead a revolt against the Catholic church 2.return Europe to the days of the Roman Empire 3.elevate the Classics above all other literature 4.unite Classical and Christian ideals A

36 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: Erasmus wanted to: 4.unite Classical and Christian ideals Erasmus advocated a life that combined the classical ideals of humanity and civic virtue with the Christian virtues of love and piety E

37 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The first European to round the Cape of Good Hope at the tip of Africa was: 1.da Gama 2.Dias 3.Vespucci 4.Magellan Q

38 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The first European to round the Cape of Good Hope at the tip of Africa was: 1.da Gama 2.Dias 3.Vespucci 4.Magellan A

39 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: The first European to round the Cape of Good Hope at the tip of Africa was: 2.Dias Bartholomew Dias pioneered the eastern Portuguese Empire in 1487 after safely rounding the Cape of Good Hope at the tip of Africa E

40 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The writings of Las Casas contributed to the emergence of: 1.a new kind of fanatical conquistador 2.an organized opposition to European expansion 3.the Black Legend 4.None of the above Q

41 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The writings of Las Casas contributed to the emergence of: 1.a new kind of fanatical conquistador 2.an organized opposition to European expansion 3.the Black Legend 4.None of the above A

42 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: The writings of Las Casas contributed to the emergence of: 3.the Black Legend Bartolomé de Las Casa wrote an exposé of Spanish missionaries that prompted the Spanish government to issue some reforming regulations. Las Casass work also became the source of the Black Legend, a tradition that has exaggerated Spanish cruelty and soft-pedaled such things as Aztec human sacrifice E

43 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The encomienda was: 1.a large estate in the New World 2.a charter granting the right to found a colony 3.the forced transfer of criminals from Spain to the New World 4.a grant of the right to the labor of a specific number of Indians Q

44 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The encomienda was: 1.a large estate in the New World 2.a charter granting the right to found a colony 3.the forced transfer of criminals from Spain to the New World 4.a grant of the right to the labor of a specific number of Indians A

45 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: The encomienda was: 4.a grant of the right to the labor of a specific number of Indians The Spaniards developed strategies for exploiting the labor of the native Indians including encomiendaa legal grant of the right to the labor of a specific number of Indians for a particular period of time E


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