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© 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Napoleons victories in Italy culminated in the Treaty of: 1.Vienna 2.Austerlitz 3.Tilsit 4.Campo Formio 19.01 Q.

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Presentation on theme: "© 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Napoleons victories in Italy culminated in the Treaty of: 1.Vienna 2.Austerlitz 3.Tilsit 4.Campo Formio 19.01 Q."— Presentation transcript:

1 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Napoleons victories in Italy culminated in the Treaty of: 1.Vienna 2.Austerlitz 3.Tilsit 4.Campo Formio Q

2 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Napoleons victories in Italy culminated in the Treaty of: 1.Vienna 2.Austerlitz 3.Tilsit 4.Campo Formio A

3 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: Napoleons victories in Italy culminated in the Treaty of: 4.Campo Formio In a series of lightning victories, Bonaparte crushed the Austrian and Sardinian armies. On his own initiative, and against the wishes of the government in Paris, he concluded the Treaty of Campo Formio in October The treaty took Austria out of the war and crowned Napoleons campaign with success. Before long, France dominated all of Italy and Switzerland E

4 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Napoleons Concordat with the Catholic Church: 1.gave the French state the right to name bishops 2.returned church-state relations to pre-revolutionary conditions 3.confirmed the legitimacy of clergy who had accepted the Revolution 4.All of the above Q

5 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Napoleons Concordat with the Catholic Church: 1.gave the French state the right to name bishops 2.returned church-state relations to pre-revolutionary conditions 3.confirmed the legitimacy of clergy who had accepted the Revolution 4.All of the above A

6 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: Napoleons Concordat with the Catholic Church: 1.gave the French state the right to name bishops The concordat gave Napoleon what he most wanted. The agreement required both the refractory clergy and those who had accepted the revolution to resign. Their replacements received their spiritual investiture from the pope, but the French state named the bishops and paid their salaries and the salary of one priest in each parish. In return, the church gave up its claims to its confiscated property E

7 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. On December 2, 1805, Napoleon defeated an Austrian and Russian force at: 1.Ulm 2.Borodino 3.Jena 4.Austerlitz Q

8 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. On December 2, 1805, Napoleon defeated an Austrian and Russian force at: 1.Ulm 2.Borodino 3.Jena 4.Austerlitz A

9 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: On December 2, 1805, Napoleon defeated an Austrian and Russian force at: 4.Austerlitz In mid-October he forced an Austrian army to surrender at Ulm and occupied Vienna. On December 2, 1805, in perhaps his greatest victory, Napoleon defeated the combined Austrian and Russian forces at Austerlitz E

10 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The Continental System was designed to: 1.funnel taxes from conquered territories back to France 2.establish French political control of Europe 3.cut off British trade with the rest of Europe 4.establish supply lines for Napoleons far-flung forces Q

11 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The Continental System was designed to: 1.funnel taxes from conquered territories back to France 2.establish French political control of Europe 3.cut off British trade with the rest of Europe 4.establish supply lines for Napoleons far-flung forces A

12 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: The Continental System was designed to: 3.cut off British trade with the rest of Europe Napoleon planned to cut off all British trade with the European continent and thus to cripple British commercial and financial power. He hoped to cause domestic unrest and drive Britain from the war. Despite initial drops in exports and domestic unrest, the British economy survived. At the same time, the Continental System badly hurt the European economies E

13 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. After Prussias defeat at Jena, many German intellectuals urged: 1.resistance to Napoleon on the basis of German nationalism 2.acceptance of Napoleons rule 3.resistance to Napoleon on the basis of shared culture 4.limited acceptance of Napoleons rule Q

14 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. After Prussias defeat at Jena, many German intellectuals urged: 1.resistance to Napoleon on the basis of German nationalism 2.acceptance of Napoleons rule 3.resistance to Napoleon on the basis of shared culture 4.limited acceptance of Napoleons rule A

15 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: After Prussias defeat at Jena, many German intellectuals urged: 1.resistance to Napoleon on the basis of German nationalism Cultural nationalism prevailed until Napoleons humiliation of Prussia at Jena in At that point many German intellectuals began to urge resistance to Napoleon on the basis of German nationalism. The French conquest endangered the independence and achievements of all German-speaking people E

16 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Napoleon first faced guerrilla warfare in: 1.Austria 2.Spain 3.Prussia 4.Russia Q

17 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Napoleon first faced guerrilla warfare in: 1.Austria 2.Spain 3.Prussia 4.Russia A

18 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: Napoleon first faced guerrilla warfare in: 2.Spain In Spain, Napoleon faced a new kind of warfare. Guerrilla bands cut lines of communication, killed stragglers, destroyed isolated units, and then disappeared into the mountains E

19 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The army Napoleon amassed to invade Russia was made up of: 1.250,000 men 2.600,000 men 3.1 million men 4.3 million men Q

20 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The army Napoleon amassed to invade Russia was made up of: 1.250,000 men 2.600,000 men 3.1 million men 4.3 million men A

21 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: The army Napoleon amassed to invade Russia was made up of: 2.600,000 men Napoleon was determined to end the Russian military threat. He amassed an army of more than 600,000 men, including a core of Frenchmen and more than 400,000 other soldiers drawn from the rest of his empire E

22 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The Congress of Vienna: 1.revived the Holy Roman Empire 2.established the kingdom of Belgium 3.established the kingdom of the Netherlands 4.All of the above Q

23 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The Congress of Vienna: 1.revived the Holy Roman Empire 2.established the kingdom of Belgium 3.established the kingdom of the Netherlands 4.All of the above A

24 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: The Congress of Vienna: 3.established the kingdom of the Netherlands The Congress of Vienna assembled in September 1814, but did not conclude its work until November They established the kingdom of the Netherlands, which included Belgium and Luxembourg, in the north and added the important port of Genoa to strengthen Piedmont in the south E

25 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The period of Napoleons return to power after escaping Elba is known as the: 1.Third Empire 2.Second Empire 3.Uprising 4.Hundred Days Q

26 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The period of Napoleons return to power after escaping Elba is known as the: 1.Third Empire 2.Second Empire 3.Uprising 4.Hundred Days A

27 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: The period of Napoleons return to power after escaping Elba is known as the: 4.Hundred Days Napoleons return from Elba on March 1, 1815, further united the victors. The French army was still loyal to the former emperor, and many of the French people preferred his rule to that of the restored Bourbons. The coalition seemed to be dissolving in Vienna. Napoleon seized the opportunity, escaped to France, and soon regained power. The Hundred Days, as the period of Napoleons return is called, frightened the great powers and made the peace settlement harsher for France E

28 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The Critique of Pure Reason was written by: 1.Kant 2.Rousseau 3.Herder 4.Hegel Q

29 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The Critique of Pure Reason was written by: 1.Kant 2.Rousseau 3.Herder 4.Hegel A

30 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: The Critique of Pure Reason was written by: 1.Kant Immanuel Kant (1724–1804) wrote the two greatest philosophical works of the late eighteenth century: The Critique of Pure Reason (1781) and The Critique of Practical Reason (1788). He sought to accept the rationalism of the Enlightenment and to still preserve a belief in human freedom, immortality, and the existence of God E

31 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Coleridge was the master of: 1.Romantic love poems 2.Gothic poems of the supernatural 3.pastoral poems of nature 4.mystical spiritualism Q

32 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Coleridge was the master of: 1.Romantic love poems 2.Gothic poems of the supernatural 3.pastoral poems of nature 4.mystical spiritualism A

33 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: Coleridge was the master of: 2.Gothic poems of the supernatural Coleridge was the master of Gothic poems of the supernatural, such as The Rime of the Ancient Mariner, which relates the story of a sailor cursed for killing an albatross E

34 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The greatest of the German Romantic writers was: 1.Schlegel 2.Herder 3.Goethe 4.Werther Q

35 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The greatest of the German Romantic writers was: 1.Schlegel 2.Herder 3.Goethe 4.Werther A

36 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: The greatest of the German Romantic writers was: 3.Goethe Towering above all of these German writers stood Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749–1832). Perhaps the greatest German writer of modern times, Goethe defies easy classification E

37 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Constable and other Romantics tended to idealize: 1.ancient Greece 2.reason 3.city life 4.rural life Q

38 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Constable and other Romantics tended to idealize: 1.ancient Greece 2.reason 3.city life 4.rural life A

39 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: Constable and other Romantics tended to idealize: 4.rural life Constable and other Romantics tended to idealize rural life because they believed it was connected to the medieval past and was opposed to the increasingly urban, industrializing, commercial society that was developing around them E

40 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. John Wesley was the leader of the: 1.English Romantic movement 2.Methodist movement 3.English Catholic revival 4.Charter movement Q

41 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. John Wesley was the leader of the: 1.English Romantic movement 2.Methodist movement 3.English Catholic revival 4.Charter movement A

42 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: John Wesley was the leader of the: 2.Methodist movement Methodism originated in the middle of the eighteenth century as a revolt against deism and rationalism in the Church of England. The Methodist revival formed an important part of the background of English Romanticism. The leader of the Methodist movement was John Wesley (1703–1791) E

43 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Hegel believed ideas: 1.were innate 2.developed in an evolutionary fashion 3.were eternal 4.were the result of social and economic forces Q

44 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Hegel believed ideas: 1.were innate 2.developed in an evolutionary fashion 3.were eternal 4.were the result of social and economic forces A

45 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: Hegel believed ideas: 2.developed in an evolutionary fashion Hegel believed ideas develop in an evolutionary fashion that involves conflict. At any given time, a predominant set of ideas, which he termed the thesis, holds sway. Conflicting ideas, which Hegel termed the antithesis, challenge the thesis. As these patterns of thought clash, a synthesis emerges that eventually becomes the new thesis. Then the process begins all over again E


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