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© 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The big losers in the February 1936 Spanish elections were the: 1.Falangists 2.republicans 3.communists 4.anarchists 28.01.

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Presentation on theme: "© 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The big losers in the February 1936 Spanish elections were the: 1.Falangists 2.republicans 3.communists 4.anarchists 28.01."— Presentation transcript:

1 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The big losers in the February 1936 Spanish elections were the: 1.Falangists 2.republicans 3.communists 4.anarchists Q

2 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The big losers in the February 1936 Spanish elections were the: 1.Falangists 2.republicans 3.communists 4.anarchists A

3 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: The big losers in the February 1936 Spanish elections were the: 1.Falangists Elections in February 1936 brought to power a Spanish Popular Front government ranging from republicans of the left to communists and anarchists. The losers, especially the Falangists, the Spanish fascists, would not accept defeat at the polls E

4 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The secret provision of the Nazi-Soviet Pact: 1.divided Poland between the two powers 2.called for Germany to declare war on France in called for joint intelligence operations against France and Britain 4.involved the direct payment of large sums of money to Stalin Q

5 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The secret provision of the Nazi-Soviet Pact: 1.divided Poland between the two powers 2.called for Germany to declare war on France in called for joint intelligence operations against France and Britain 4.involved the direct payment of large sums of money to Stalin A

6 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: The secret provision of the Nazi-Soviet Pact: 1.divided Poland between the two powers The secret provisions of the pact, which were easily guessed and soon carried out, divided Poland between the two powers and allowed Russia to occupy the Baltic states and to take Bessarabia from Romania. The most bitter ideological enemies had become allies E

7 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. After the fall of France, Germany next turned its attention to: 1.Poland 2.Britain 3.the Soviet Union 4.Croatia Q

8 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. After the fall of France, Germany next turned its attention to: 1.Poland 2.Britain 3.the Soviet Union 4.Croatia A

9 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: After the fall of France, Germany next turned its attention to: 2.Britain The fall of France left Britain isolated, and Hitler expected the British to come to terms. He was prepared to allow Britain to retain its empire in return for a free hand for Germany on the Continent E

10 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Hitler claimed that the German people needed Lebensraum, or: 1.pure life 2.living space 3.blood and iron 4.the peoples religion Q

11 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Hitler claimed that the German people needed Lebensraum, or: 1.pure life 2.living space 3.blood and iron 4.the peoples religion A

12 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: Hitler claimed that the German people needed Lebensraum, or: 2.living space The defeat of Russia and the conquest of the Ukraine to provide Lebensraum, or living space, for the German people had always been a major goal for Hitler E

13 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. American resistance to Japanese expansion became much stiffer after the 1941 Japanese occupation of: 1.Manchuria 2.India 3.Indochina 4.Korea Q

14 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. American resistance to Japanese expansion became much stiffer after the 1941 Japanese occupation of: 1.Manchuria 2.India 3.Indochina 4.Korea A

15 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: American resistance to Japanese expansion became much stiffer after the 1941 Japanese occupation of: 3.Indochina The Americans had temporized, unwilling to cut off vital supplies of oil and other materials for fear of provoking a Japanese attack on Southeast Asia and the East Indies. The Japanese occupation of Indochina in July 1941 changed that policy, which had already begun to stiffen E

16 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The turning point in the Germans Russian campaign came at the Battle of: 1.the Volga 2.Moscow 3.Leningrad 4.Stalingrad Q

17 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The turning point in the Germans Russian campaign came at the Battle of: 1.the Volga 2.Moscow 3.Leningrad 4.Stalingrad A

18 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: The turning point in the Germans Russian campaign came at the Battle of: 4.Stalingrad The Battle of Stalingrad raged for months with unexampled ferocity. Because Hitler again overruled his generals and would not allow a retreat, he lost an entire German army at Stalingrad. Stalingrad marked the turning point of the Russian campaign. As the Germans resources dwindled, the Russians inexorably advanced westward E

19 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The American strategy in the Pacific in 1943 was known as: 1.strike and retreat 2.total war 3.island hopping 4.saturation attack Q

20 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The American strategy in the Pacific in 1943 was known as: 1.strike and retreat 2.total war 3.island hopping 4.saturation attack A

21 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: The American strategy in the Pacific in 1943 was known as: 3.island hopping In 1943, the American forces, still small in number, began a campaign of island hopping. They did not try to recapture every Pacific island the Japanese held, but selected major bases and strategic sites along the enemy supply line E

22 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Conditions in Germany changed rapidly when the German army failed to: 1.conquer Britain 2.subdue partisan forces in France 3.fully occupy Poland 4.quickly defeat the Soviet Union Q

23 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Conditions in Germany changed rapidly when the German army failed to: 1.conquer Britain 2.subdue partisan forces in France 3.fully occupy Poland 4.quickly defeat the Soviet Union A

24 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: Conditions in Germany changed rapidly when the German army failed to: 4.quickly defeat the Soviet Union During the first two years of the war, in fact, Hitler demanded few sacrifices from the German people. Spending on domestic projects continued, and food was plentiful; the economy was not on a full wartime footing. Germanys failure to quickly overwhelm the Soviet Union changed everything E

25 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Josef Goebbels was in charge of: 1.concentration camps in Poland 2.Nazi propaganda 3.coordinating operations in the Soviet Union 4.coordinating German economic planning Q

26 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Josef Goebbels was in charge of: 1.concentration camps in Poland 2.Nazi propaganda 3.coordinating operations in the Soviet Union 4.coordinating German economic planning A

27 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: Josef Goebbels was in charge of: 2.Nazi propaganda Propaganda minister Josef Goebbels (1897–1945) used both radio and films to boost the Nazi cause E

28 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The Vichy government was headed by: 1.General Foch 2.General Joffre 3.Marshal Pétain 4.Charles de Gaulle Q

29 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The Vichy government was headed by: 1.General Foch 2.General Joffre 3.Marshal Pétain 4.Charles de Gaulle A

30 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: The Vichy government was headed by: 3.Marshal Pétain Marshal Pétain set up a dictatorial regime at the resort city of Vichy and collaborated with the Germans in hopes of preserving as much autonomy as possible E

31 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The Big Three included all of the following EXCEPT: 1.Britain 2.the United States 3.the Soviet Union 4.France Q

32 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The Big Three included all of the following EXCEPT: 1.Britain 2.the United States 3.the Soviet Union 4.France A

33 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: The Big Three included all of the following EXCEPT: 4.France The first meeting of the leaders of the Big Three (the USSR, Britain, and the United States) took place at Tehran, the capital of Iran, in E

34 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The U.S. and Britain agreed to open a second front in France in 1944 at the: 1.Yalta conference 2.Tehran conference 3.Potsdam conference 4.Moscow conference Q

35 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The U.S. and Britain agreed to open a second front in France in 1944 at the: 1.Yalta conference 2.Tehran conference 3.Potsdam conference 4.Moscow conference A

36 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: The U.S. and Britain agreed to open a second front in France in 1944 at the: 2.Tehran conference At the Tehran conference the Big Three agreed to open a second front in France the next summer (1944) and Stalin agreed to fight Japan when Germany was defeated E


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