Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

© 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The era of reparations came to an end in 1932 as a result of the: 1.Young Conference 2.Dawes Conference 3.Lausanne Conference.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "© 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The era of reparations came to an end in 1932 as a result of the: 1.Young Conference 2.Dawes Conference 3.Lausanne Conference."— Presentation transcript:

1 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The era of reparations came to an end in 1932 as a result of the: 1.Young Conference 2.Dawes Conference 3.Lausanne Conference 4.Kellogg-Briand Conference 27.01 Q

2 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The era of reparations came to an end in 1932 as a result of the: 1.Young Conference 2.Dawes Conference 3.Lausanne Conference 4.Kellogg-Briand Conference 27.01 A

3 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: The era of reparations came to an end in 1932 as a result of the: 3.Lausanne Conference The Hoover moratorium was a prelude to the end of reparations. The French agreed to the moratorium only because the German economy had all but collapsed. The Lausanne Conference in the summer of 1932, in effect, ended the era of reparations. 27.01 E

4 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. John Maynard Keynes advocated: 1.active government intervention in the economy 2.complete government control of the economy 3.pure laissez-faire capitalism 4.government management of currency fluctuations 27.02 Q

5 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. John Maynard Keynes advocated: 1.active government intervention in the economy 2.complete government control of the economy 3.pure laissez-faire capitalism 4.government management of currency fluctuations 27.02 A

6 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: John Maynard Keynes advocated: 1.active government intervention in the economy Keynes advocated active government intervention in the economy. He believed the market would not always operate automatically and urged government spending to expand overall demand during an economic downturn 27.02 E

7 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Frances Popular Front was a: 1.coalition of right-wing parties 2.coalition of left-wing parties 3.coalition of fascists and religious conservatives 4.coalition of communists and anarchists 27.03 Q

8 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Frances Popular Front was a: 1.coalition of right-wing parties 2.coalition of left-wing parties 3.coalition of fascists and religious conservatives 4.coalition of communists and anarchists 27.03 A

9 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: Frances Popular Front was a: 2.coalition of left-wing parties Despite deep suspicions on all sides, what became known as the Popular Front, a coalition of all leftwing parties, had been established by July 1935. Its purpose was to preserve the republic and press for social reform. 27.03 E

10 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The Nazi storm troopers were known also known as the: 1.SS 2.SA 3.Gestapo 4.Wehrmacht 27.04 Q

11 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The Nazi storm troopers were known also known as the: 1.SS 2.SA 3.Gestapo 4.Wehrmacht 27.04 A

12 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: The Nazi storm troopers were known also known as the: 2.SA By late 1933, the SA, or storm troopers, had approximately one million active members and a larger number of reserves. The commander of this party army was Ernst Roehm (1887– 1934), a possible rival to Hitler himself. 27.04 E

13 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Hitlers support came from: 1.across the social spectrum 2.the lower-middle class 3.the upper-middle class 4.wealthy elites 27.05 Q

14 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Hitlers support came from: 1.across the social spectrum 2.the lower-middle class 3.the upper-middle class 4.wealthy elites 27.05 A

15 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: Hitlers support came from: 1.across the social spectrum Hitler had technically become chancellor by legal means. He had forged a rigidly disciplined party structure and had mastered the techniques of mass politics and propaganda. His support appears to have come from across the social spectrum and not, as historians once thought, just from the lower middle class. 27.05 E

16 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The Enabling Act: 1.formally repealed the Weimar constitution 2.authorized German remilitarization 3.stripped Jews of their civil rights 4.permitted Hitler to rule by decree 27.06 Q

17 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The Enabling Act: 1.formally repealed the Weimar constitution 2.authorized German remilitarization 3.stripped Jews of their civil rights 4.permitted Hitler to rule by decree 27.06 A

18 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: The Enabling Act: 4.permitted Hitler to rule by decree On March 23, 1933, the Reichstag passed an Enabling Act that permitted Hitler to rule by decree. Thereafter, his exercise of power had no legal limits. 27.06 E

19 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Nazi ideology gave German women the task of: 1.contributing more to the economy than women anywhere else in the world 2.supplementing the industrial workforce 3.producing as many children as possible 4.producing racially pure children 27.07 Q

20 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Nazi ideology gave German women the task of: 1.contributing more to the economy than women anywhere else in the world 2.supplementing the industrial workforce 3.producing as many children as possible 4.producing racially pure children 27.07 A

21 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: Nazi ideology gave German women the task of: 4.producing racially pure children In their role as mothers, German women had the special task of preserving racial purity and giving birth to more pure Germans who were healthy in mind and body. According to this view, women were to breed strong sons and daughters for the German nation. 27.07 E

22 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Nazi economic policy included all of the following EXCEPT: 1.support of the free trade-union movement 2.de-emphasis of consumer satisfaction 3.limits on the private exercise of capital 4.sacrifice of political and civil liberties 27.08 Q

23 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Nazi economic policy included all of the following EXCEPT: 1.support of the free trade-union movement 2.de-emphasis of consumer satisfaction 3.limits on the private exercise of capital 4.sacrifice of political and civil liberties 27.08 A

24 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: Nazi economic policy included all of the following EXCEPT: 1.support of the free trade-union movement The Nazi economic experiment proved that, by sacrificing all political and civil liberty, destroying a free trade-union movement, limiting the private exercise of capital, and ignoring consumer satisfaction, a government could achieve full employment to prepare for war and aggression. 27.08 E

25 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The economic policy of Italian fascists was known as: 1.communalism 2.national socialism 3.national austerity 4.corporatism 27.09 Q

26 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The economic policy of Italian fascists was known as: 1.communalism 2.national socialism 3.national austerity 4.corporatism 27.09 A

27 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: The economic policy of Italian fascists was known as: 4.corporatism Both before and during the depression, the fascists sought to steer an economic course between socialism and a liberal laissez-faire system. Their policy was known as corporatism. It was a planned economy linked to the private ownership of capital and to government arbitration of labor disputes. 27.09 E

28 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Gosplan oversaw: 1.the purges of Stalins enemies 2.all Soviet military efforts 3.the entire Soviet economy 4.the expansion of the Soviet bureaucracy 27.10 Q

29 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Gosplan oversaw: 1.the purges of Stalins enemies 2.all Soviet military efforts 3.the entire Soviet economy 4.the expansion of the Soviet bureaucracy 27.10 A

30 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: Gosplan oversaw: 3.the entire Soviet economy Stalins organizational vehicle for industrialization was a series of five-year plans, starting in 1928. The State Planning Commission, or Gosplan, oversaw the program, setting goals for production in every area of economic life and attempting to organize the economy to meet them. 27.10 E

31 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. A kulak came to be defined as: 1.any person who resisted the dictates of Gosplan 2.a rural supporter of Stalin 3.any peasant who resisted collectivization 4.a person with pro-Western attitudes 27.11 Q

32 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. A kulak came to be defined as: 1.any person who resisted the dictates of Gosplan 2.a rural supporter of Stalin 3.any peasant who resisted collectivization 4.a person with pro-Western attitudes 27.11 A

33 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: A kulak came to be defined as: 3.any peasant who resisted collectivization In 1929 Stalin ordered a program of collectivization of agriculture that was only vaguely defined. As part of this plan, the government announced its determination to eliminate the kulaks as a class. At this point, however, the definition of a kulak came to embrace any peasants, whatever their wealth, who resisted collectivization and were thus regarded as counterrevolutionary. 27.11 E

34 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Internal opposition to Stalin was generated by: 1.his decision to industrialize rapidly 2.his reversal of Comintern policy 3.his decision to move against the peasants 4.All of the above 27.12 Q

35 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Internal opposition to Stalin was generated by: 1.his decision to industrialize rapidly 2.his reversal of Comintern policy 3.his decision to move against the peasants 4.All of the above 27.12 A

36 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: Internal opposition to Stalin was generated by: 4.All of the above Stalins decisions to industrialize rapidly, to move against the peasants, and to reverse the Comintern policy aroused internal opposition. Each was a departure from the policies of Lenin. 27.12 E

37 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The pretext for the onset of Stalins purges was: 1.the assassination of Sergei Kirov 2.anti-collectivization riots in the countryside 3.the discovery of pro-German agents in the government 4.an attempt on Stalins life 27.13 Q

38 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The pretext for the onset of Stalins purges was: 1.the assassination of Sergei Kirov 2.anti-collectivization riots in the countryside 3.the discovery of pro-German agents in the government 4.an attempt on Stalins life 27.13 A

39 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: The pretext for the onset of Stalins purges was: 1.the assassination of Sergei Kirov The pretext for the onset of the purges was the assassination on December 1, 1934, of Sergei Kirov (1888–1934), the popular party chief of Leningrad and a member of the Politburo. 27.13 E


Download ppt "© 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The era of reparations came to an end in 1932 as a result of the: 1.Young Conference 2.Dawes Conference 3.Lausanne Conference."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google