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Linda Hall Library of Science, Engineering & Technology 5109 Cherry St., Kansas City, MO Brunch & Learn November 15, 2008 Minding Our Students: How to.

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Presentation on theme: "Linda Hall Library of Science, Engineering & Technology 5109 Cherry St., Kansas City, MO Brunch & Learn November 15, 2008 Minding Our Students: How to."— Presentation transcript:

1 Linda Hall Library of Science, Engineering & Technology 5109 Cherry St., Kansas City, MO Brunch & Learn November 15, 2008 Minding Our Students: How to Assist the High School to College TransitionHANDOUT Daryl E. Chubin Director, AAAS Capacity Center American Association for the Advancement of Science

2 Brunch & Learn – Nov. 15, 2008 Data

3 Brunch & Learn – Nov. 15, 2008 The numbers of non-Hispanic whites in the U.S. is projected to level off, with large increases in the Hispanic population.

4 Brunch & Learn – Nov. 15, 2008

5 Most Recent K-12 Cases Parents Involved In Community Schools v. Seattle (Washington) School District No. 1 et al. and Meredith v. Jefferson County (Kentucky) Board of Education, both decided in June 2007 Applying the doctrine of strict scrutiny, the court found that programs in these districts did not meet the Grutter test (in the 2003 U. of Michigan case) The Supreme Court ruled that these two school districts were focused solely on achieving a certain black/white racial balance mirroring that of school districts. The Court did not link this to Grutter.

6 Brunch & Learn – Nov. 15, 2008 Intended College Major of High School Juniors © 2006 WEPAN, Prepared by CPST,

7 Brunch & Learn – Nov. 15, 2008 What Mathematics Courses Are U.S. High School Students Taking? © 2006 WEPAN, Prepared by CPST,

8 Brunch & Learn – Nov. 15, 2008 U.S. Department of Education, The Toolbox Revisited: Paths to Degree Completion From High School Through College, Feb Academic Intensity: The rigor of a student's high-school curriculum is the strongest indicator of whether one will earn a college degree, regardless of major. The "academic intensity" of students' high-school courses played a larger role than did their grades and standardized test scores. Mathematics: "The world demands advanced quantitative literacy, and no matter what a student's postsecondary field of study... more than a ceremonial visit to college-level mathematics is called for." Demographic background: Students from lower socioeconomic backgrounds were less likely to attend high schools that offered high-level courses. Latino students, for instance, were far less likely to attend schools that offered calculus or trigonometry than white or Asian students. Based on a longitudinal study of a nationally representative cohort of students from the high-school class of 1992, the report finds...

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10 Description of Generation Trends MaturesBaby BoomersGeneration XGeneration Net Birth dates DescriptionGreatest generation Me generationLatchkey generation Millennials AttributesCommand and control Self-sacrifice Optimistic Workaholic Independent Skeptical Hopeful Determined LikesRespect for authority Family Community involvement Responsibility Work ethic Can-do attitude Freedom Multitasking Work-life balance Public activism Latest technology Parents DislikesWaste Technology Laziness Turning 50 Red tape Hype Anything slow Negativity Source: Oblinger and Oblinger, 2005, pp

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15 Engineering accounted for just 1 in 20 bachelors degrees in 2006.

16 Brunch & Learn – Nov. 15, 2008 Financing a College Education Nearly half of all students in attended institutions where the published average annual in-state tuition and fees were less than $2,550. Three out of every five students attended institutions where the published average annual in-state tuition and fees were less than $4,750 per year. Only three out of every 100 students were enrolled at institutions where the average annual tuition and fees were more than $25,000 per year. Nearly 20 percent of traditional-aged undergraduates come from families with incomes below $25,000 per year. Seven out of 10 full-time students receive some sort of financial aid. source: ACE, Facts About College Access and Affordability, Jan. 2008

17 Brunch & Learn – Nov. 15, 2008 Community Colleges 6.5 million students o46% of all undergrads o35% minority o60% women o47% receive financial aid o39% first-generation attendees 62% part-time faculty o11% full-time & <45 years old o6% full-time, <45 year-olds of color source: AACC (students); ACE (faculty)

18 Brunch & Learn – Nov. 15, 2008 Resources

19 Brunch & Learn – Nov. 15, : To help guide program staff & university counsels in interpreting the Grutter and Gratz rulings : New Sloan- and NSF- funded pilot project to vet effective STEM programs & practices re students & faculty for legal sustainability See

20 Brunch & Learn – Nov. 15, 2008 Equal Pay Act of 1963 – abolishes differential pay based on sex Civil Rights Act of 1964 – outlaws racial segregation in schools & discrimination in employment; establishes Equal Employment Opportunity Commission as enforcer Title IX 1972 – any educational program receiving Federal funds may not discriminate based on sex Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990 – bars discrimination in employment based on disability Civil Rights Act of 1991 – strengthens 1964 civil rights laws; establishes the Glass Ceiling Commission ( ) Laws Matter:

21 Brunch & Learn – Nov. 15, 2008 American Institute of Physics American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Commission on Professionals in Science and Technology (CPST) Diversity Web Engineering Trends National Academy of Engineering National Science Foundation – Statistics Science, Gender and After-school WEPAN Knowledge Center Rich Web Sites

22 Brunch & Learn – Nov. 15, 2008 Recent SourcesMy Personal Involvement Making a Case for Diversity in STEM Fields, Inside Higher Ed, Oct. 6, (with S.M. Malcom). Educating Generation NetCan U.S. Engineering Woo and Win the Competition for Talent? Journal of Engineering Education, v. 97, July 2008: (with K. Donaldson, L. Fleming, and B. Olds). Federal Agencies ( ) and Professional Societies ( ) in S. Rosser, ed., Women, Science, and Myth: Gender Beliefs from Antiquity to the Present, ABC- CLIO, NACME Data Book2008 Update. Commission on Professionals in Science and Technology, (with L. Frehill).http://www.nacme.org/databook/ Voices of the Future: African American PhDs in the Sciences, In R.J. Burke and M.C. Mattis, eds., Women and Minorities in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics: Upping the Numbers. Edward Elgar, 2007: The New Backlash on Campus, College and University Journal, v. 81, Fall 2006: (with S.M. Malcom).

23 Brunch & Learn – Nov. 15, 2008 Thank you! To continue the conversation... Daryl Chubin, Ph.D., Director AAAS Capacity Center


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