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Holt Algebra 2 3-4 Linear Programming 3-4 Linear Programming Holt Algebra 2 Warm Up Warm Up Lesson Presentation Lesson Presentation Lesson Quiz Lesson.

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Presentation on theme: "Holt Algebra 2 3-4 Linear Programming 3-4 Linear Programming Holt Algebra 2 Warm Up Warm Up Lesson Presentation Lesson Presentation Lesson Quiz Lesson."— Presentation transcript:

1 Holt Algebra Linear Programming 3-4 Linear Programming Holt Algebra 2 Warm Up Warm Up Lesson Presentation Lesson Presentation Lesson Quiz Lesson Quiz

2 Holt Algebra Linear Programming Warm Up Determine if the given ordered pair is a solution of x + y 6 x – 2y >10 1.(3, 3) 2.(10, 1) 3. (12, 0) 4.(15, 2) no yes no

3 Holt Algebra Linear Programming Solve linear programming problems. Objective

4 Holt Algebra Linear Programming linear programming constraint feasible region objective function Vocabulary

5 Holt Algebra Linear Programming Green roofs are covered with plants instead of traditional materials like concrete or shingles to help lower heat and improve air quality. The plants landscape architects choose might depend on the price, the amount of water they require, and the amount of carbon dioxide they absorb.

6 Holt Algebra Linear Programming Linear programming is method of finding a maximum or minimum value of a function that satisfies a given set of conditions called constraints. A constraint is one of the inequalities in a linear programming problem. The solution to the set of constraints can be graphed as a feasible region.

7 Holt Algebra Linear Programming Yums Bakery bakes two breads, A and B. One batch of A uses 5 pounds of oats and 3 pounds of flour. One batch of B uses 2 pounds of oats and 3 pounds of flour. The company has 180 pounds of oats and 135 pounds of flour available. Write the constraints for the problem and graph the feasible region. Example 1: Graphing a Feasible Region

8 Holt Algebra Linear Programming Let x = the number of bread A, and y = the number of bread B. Write the constraints: The number of batches cannot be negative. The combined amount of oats is less than or equal to 180 pounds. x 0 y 0 5x + 2y 180 3x + 3y 135 The combined amount of flour is less than or equal to 135 pounds. Example 1 Continued

9 Holt Algebra Linear Programming Graph the feasible region. The feasible region is a quadrilateral with vertices at (0, 0), (36, 0), (30, 15), and (0, 45). Check A point in the feasible region, such as (10, 10), satisfies all of the constraints.

10 Holt Algebra Linear Programming Check It Out! Example 1 Graph the feasible region for the following constraints. x 0 y x + 5y 20 3x + 2y 12 The number cannot be negative. The combined area is less than or equal to 20. The combined area is less than or equal to 12. The number is greater or equal to 1.5.

11 Holt Algebra Linear Programming Check It Out! Example 1 Continued Graph the feasible region. The feasible region is a quadrilateral with vertices at (0, 1.5), (0, 4), (2, 3), and (3, 1.5). Check A point in the feasible region, such as (2, 2), satisfies all of the constraints.

12 Holt Algebra Linear Programming In most linear programming problems, you want to do more than identify the feasible region. Often you want to find the best combination of values in order to minimize or maximize a certain function. This function is the objective function. The objective function may have a minimum, a maximum, neither, or both depending on the feasible region.

13 Holt Algebra Linear Programming

14 Holt Algebra Linear Programming More advanced mathematics can prove that the maximum or minimum value of the objective function will always occur at a vertex of the feasible region.

15 Holt Algebra Linear Programming Yums Bakery wants to maximize its profits from bread sales. One batch of A yields a profit of $40. One batch of B yields a profit of $30. Use the profit information and the data from Example 1 to find how many batches of each bread the bakery should bake. Example 2: Solving Linear Programming Problems

16 Holt Algebra Linear Programming Example 2 Continued Step 1 Let P = the profit from the bread. Write the objective function: P = 40x + 30y Step 2 Recall the constraints and the graph from Example 1. x 0 y 0 5x + 2y 180 3x + 3y 135

17 Holt Algebra Linear Programming Example 2 Continued Step 3 Evaluate the objective function at the vertices of the feasible region. (x, y)40x + 30yP($) (0, 0)40(0) + 30(0)0 (0, 45)40(0) + 30(45)1350 (30, 15)40(30) + 30(15)1650 (36, 0)40(36) + 30(0)1440 Yums Bakery should make 30 batches of bread A and 15 batches of bread B to maximize the amount of profit. The maximum value occurs at the vertex (30, 15).

18 Holt Algebra Linear Programming Check your graph of the feasible region by using your calculator. Be sure to change the variables to x and y. Helpful Hint

19 Holt Algebra Linear Programming Check It Out! Example 2 Maximize the objective function P = 25x + 30y under the following constraints. x 0 y x + 5y 20 3x + 2y 12

20 Holt Algebra Linear Programming Step 1 Write the objective function: P= 25x + 30y Step 2 Use the constraints to graph. x 0 y x + 5y 20 3x + 2y 12 Check It Out! Example 2 Continued

21 Holt Algebra Linear Programming Step 3 Evaluate the objective function at the vertices of the feasible region. (x, y)25x + 30yP($) (0, 4)25(0) + 30(4)120 (0, 1.5)25(0) + 30(1.5)45 (2, 3)25(2) + 30(3)140 (3, 1.5)25(3) + 30(1.5)120 The maximum value occurs at the vertex (2, 3). Check It Out! Example 2 Continued P = 140

22 Holt Algebra Linear Programming Sue manages a soccer club and must decide how many members to send to soccer camp. It costs $75 for each advanced player and $50 for each intermediate player. Sue can spend no more than $13,250. Sue must send at least 60 more advanced than intermediate players and a minimum of 80 advanced players. Find the number of each type of player Sue can send to camp to maximize the number of players at camp. Example 3: Problem-Solving Application

23 Holt Algebra Linear Programming 1 Understand the Problem Example 3 Continued The answer will be in two partsthe number of advanced players and the number of intermediate players that will be sent to camp.

24 Holt Algebra Linear Programming There needs to be a minimum of 80 advanced players. Sue wants to send the maximum number of players possible. List the important information: Advanced players cost $75. Intermediate players cost $50. Sue can spend no more than $13,250. Sue must send at least 60 more advanced players than intermediate players. 1 Understand the Problem

25 Holt Algebra Linear Programming Let x = the number of advanced players and y = the number of intermediate players. Write the constraints and objective function based on the important information. 2 Make a Plan x 80 y 0 75x + 50y 13,250 x – y 60 The number of advanced players is at least 80. The number of intermediate players cannot be negative. There are at least 60 more advanced players than intermediate players. The total cost must be no more than $13,250. Let P = the number of players sent to camp. The objective function is P = x + y.

26 Holt Algebra Linear Programming Graph the feasible region, and identify the vertices. Evaluate the objective function at each vertex. Solve 3 P(80, 0) = (80) + (0) = 80 P(80, 20) = (80) + (20) = 100 P(176, 0) = (176) + (0) = 176 P(130,70) = (130) + (70) = 200

27 Holt Algebra Linear Programming Look Back 4 Check the values (130, 70) in the constraints. x y x – y 60 (130) – (70) x + 50y 13,250 75(130) + 50(70) 13,250 13,250

28 Holt Algebra Linear Programming Check It Out! Example 3 A book store manager is purchasing new bookcases. The store needs 320 feet of shelf space. Bookcase A provides 32 ft of shelf space and costs $200. Bookcase B provides 16 ft of shelf space and costs $125. Because of space restrictions, the store has room for at most 8 of bookcase A and 12 of bookcase B. How many of each type of bookcase should the manager purchase to minimize the cost?

29 Holt Algebra Linear Programming 1 Understand the Problem The answer will be in two partsthe number of bookcases that provide 32 ft of shelf space and the number of bookcases that provide 16 ft of shelf space. List the important information: Bookcase A cost $200. Bookcase B cost $125. The store needs at least 320 feet of shelf space. Manager has room for at most 8 of bookcase A and 12 of bookcase B. Minimize the cost of the types of bookcases.

30 Holt Algebra Linear Programming Let x represent the number of Bookcase A and y represent the number of Bookcase B. Write the constraints and objective function based on the important information. 2 Make a Plan x 0 y 0 32x + 16y 320 x 8 The number of Bookcase A cannot be negative. The number of Bookcase B cannot be negative. There are 8 or less of Bookcase A. The total shelf space is at least 320 feet. y 12 There are 12 or less of Bookcase B. Let P = The number of Bookcase A and Bookcase B. The objective function is P = 200x + 125y.

31 Holt Algebra Linear Programming Graph the feasible region, and identify the vertices. Evaluate the objective function at each vertex. Solve 3 P(4, 12) = (800) + (1500) = 2300 P(8, 12) = (1600) + (1500) = 3100 P(8, 4) = (1600) + (500) = 2100

32 Holt Algebra Linear Programming Look Back 4 Check the values (8, 4) in the constraints. x 0y 0 32x + 16y 320 x 8y (8) + 16(4)

33 Holt Algebra Linear Programming Lesson Quiz 1. Ace Guitars produces acoustic and electric guitars. Each acoustic guitar yields a profit of $30, and requires 2 work hours in factory A and 4 work hours in factory B. Each electric guitar yields a profit of $50 and requires 4 work hours in factory A and 3 work hours in factory B. Each factory operates for at most 10 hours each day. Graph the feasible region. Then, find the number of each type of guitar that should be produced each day to maximize the companys profits.

34 Holt Algebra Linear Programming 1 acoustic; 2 electric Lesson Quiz


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