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Engineering Education for Competitiveness (EEC): Improving Engineering Curricula in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) June 22, 2010 Courtesy: Google.

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Presentation on theme: "Engineering Education for Competitiveness (EEC): Improving Engineering Curricula in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) June 22, 2010 Courtesy: Google."— Presentation transcript:

1 Engineering Education for Competitiveness (EEC): Improving Engineering Curricula in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) June 22, 2010 Courtesy: Google Images. Office of Science, Technology and Innovation (OSTI) Department of Economic Development, Trade and Tourism (DEDTT)

2 Prosperity (reaching social welfare) Productivity (more production per worker) Quality + Innovation (value-added products, services and processes) Competitiveness (markets and exports expansion) Innovation, Competitiveness and Prosperity Courtesy: Google images

3 Triple Value Added of OAS Science, Technology, Engineering and Innovation as tools for Prosperity (Plan of Action of the 2nd Meeting of Ministers and High Authorities in Science and Technology, Mexico 2008) STEI and public policies for integral development STEI as tools for sustainable natural resource management STEI as tools for increasing competitiveness Mandates and Political Priorities of governments of governments of the Americas Power to Convene: Cooperation and Strategic Partners OAS – Office of Science, Technology and Innovation Programs and Actions TM EftA TM STEI = Science, Technology, Engineering and Innovation

4 Engineering for the Americas (EftA) Educational Innovation Promotes innovation and educational reform, the implementation of advanced technologies and best practices for curricular improvement in engineering. Accreditation and Quality Assurance Promotes activities to establish or enhance quality assurance in engineering education, so that engineering programs comply with national, regional and hemispheric standards. Cooperation for Job Creation Promotes sustained cooperation with the industry, government and academia through internships, coops and programs that stimulate employment. EftA is an hemispheric initiative of OAS that seeks to develop and support qualified engineers to improve industry competitiveness in Latin America and the Caribbean. TM EftA TM

5 Scientists study the world as it is; engineers create the world that has never been. Theodore Von Karman Engineers create new technologies, systems, processes and products. They also innovate and improve upon existing ones. They help ensure that products, services and processes comply with global market demands in terms of quality, security, safety, reliability, productivity, punctuality and environmental compatibility. Engineering helps increase competitiveness by using human, capital, and natural resources efficiently and sustainably. Building engineering capacity intersects the needs of multiple stakeholders, providing the broadest possible opportunities to improve the regions economic vitality and security, mitigate poverty, foster community health and improve long-term quality of life. Why Engineering? Courtesy: Google Images.

6 Engineering Curricula: LAC vs OECD IndicatorsLACOECD CourseworkFixed core curricula, fewer elective courses and specialization tracks. Flexible curricula, more electives and specialization options. Entrepreneurial skills Few options to acquire entrepreneurial skills to promote start-up business Strong emphasis on business, managerial, ethical and entrepreneurial skills Co-opsExtremely limited opportunities for hands-on experience in institutions or the private sector. More availability of structured academically accredited co-op programs with private sector. InnovationLittle emphasis on innovation practices. Innovation as a fundamental tenant of engineering education. International program accreditation Very few programs are accredited by international boards; graduates seek accreditation from institutions abroad. Accredited programs that result in career improvement, international mobility and recruitment by multinationals. Sources: OAS, ABET, Dabipi et al. (2002)

7 General Objective: Contribute to increase competitiveness and capacity for innovation in LAC countries through a better-prepared engineering labor force. Engineering Education for Competitiveness Program (EEC) Specific Objective: To improve engineering curricula in LAC universities through content upgrade, the incorporation of global competencies and entrepreneurial skills, and the development of academia- private sector partnerships. TM EftA TM

8 5 Program Modules First Module Courtesy: Google Images.

9 Program Components Curricular and standard program requirements in industrialized countries Identification of improvement needs in study programs of the region Core study program model Adaptation and implementation of core model in 8 LAC univ. Inter-American Portal of Engineering Education Module I: Industrial Engineering CIMEQ Modules: -Civil -Industrial -Mechanical -Electrical -Chemical

10 Component No. 1 Courtesy: University of Illinois. Curricular and standard program requirements in industrialized countries Study program requirements in industrialized countries Minimum requirements for accreditation Study program in terms of: -Curricula - Best global competencies - Best entrepreneurial practices

11 Component No. 2 Courtesy: Google Images. Identification of improvement needs in study programs of the region Agreements with 8 LAC universities (2 per sub-region) Consultation rounds with engineering deans and faculty to establish regional needs Study program needs in terms of: -Curricula -Global competencies -Entrepreneurial practices Establishment of baseline indicators

12 Component No. 3 Courtesy: Google Images. Core study program model Agreements with at least 4 mentor universities Design and development of upgraded core study program model Presentation of core program model to Deans and faculty of LAC participating universities Review and modifications of core program model Validation of core program model by LAC participating universities

13 Component No. 4 Courtesy: Google Images. Adaptation and implementation of core model in 8 LAC universities At least 2 agreements with private sector/academia ( internships, co- ops and applied research) Adaptation of core study program model in LAC universities Implementation of study programs: -Faculty training -Exchange of faculty and students -Women in engineering leadership seminars -Engineering entrepreneurial labs (train-the- trainers)

14 Component No. 5 Courtesy: Google Images. Inter-American Portal of Engineering Education Agreement with LAC university to host Web Portal Identification of technical and operations requirements Implementation of Web Portal

15 Module Assessment Courtesy: Google Images. Module Assessment Monitoring report (year 2) Evaluation report (year 5) Impact evaluation report (year 7)

16 Additional Information Potential Beneficiaries: Direct: Schools/Deans of Engineering, Graduates/future engineers, LAC firms (Production and Services Industry). Indirect: Ministries/Governments, Professional Associations, national economy, environment, society in general. Quick facts: 5 Modules: Civil, Industrial, Mechanical, Electrical & Chemical Participating LAC universities: 40 (8 per module) Mentor universities: 20 (4 per module) Estimated budget per module: US$3.4 million Expected contributions: in-kind & financial Total estimated budget for 5 modules: US$ 17.1 million

17 Benefits of Partnership for Mentor Universities (Germany) Academic leadership and influence in the region. Increased collaboration with LAC universities (mentees) LAC universities will be exposed to German methodologies, know-how and technologies. Exchange of information and experience abroad (e.g. exchange of faculty). Increased diversity in the student body (e.g. exchange of students). Exposure to new cultures. Opportunity to expand outreach activities internationally. Courtesy: Google Images.

18 Current Institutional Partners (EftA members) Young Americas Business Trust (YABT) American Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) Canadian Engineering Accreditation Board (CEAB) International Federation of Engineering Education Societies (IFEES) Consortium of Latin American and Caribbean Engineering (LACCEI) Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio) Pontifical Catholic University of Chile (PCU-Chile) Monterrey Institute of Technology and Higher Education (ITESM-Tec) The University of West Indies, Trinidad and Tobago Brazilian National Confederation of Industry (CNI) Ibero-American Science and Technology Education Consortium (ISTEC) Argentinean Center of Engineers (CAI) Federal Council of Deans of Engineering of Argentina (CONFEDI) Microsoft HP Laboratories Open Innovation Office

19 Thank you for your attention. Oscar Harasic Chief, Office of Science, Technology and Innovation (OSTI) oharasic@oas.org oharasic@oas.org Jorge Duran Senior Specialist Science, Technology and Innovation jduran@oas.org Engineering Education for Competitiveness (EEC) TM EftA TM


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