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Multidimensional Security in the Americas

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1 Multidimensional Security in the Americas
Programs of the Secretariat for Multidimensional Security (SMS)

2 Table of Contents The Secretariat for Multidimensional Security
SMS Programs and Subprograms Organizational Structure and Human Capital Financial resources received in 2012 – 2013. Summary of the principal achievements in 2012 – 2013. Main lines of action for 2014 Proposed new orientation for OAS activities.

3 1. The Secretariat for Multidimensional Security (SMS)
MISSION “To promote and coordinate cooperation among OAS member states, and between member states and the Inter-American System, to evaluate, prevent, confront, and respond to threats to security.” VISION “To be the principal hemispheric benchmark to develop cooperation and build the capacity of OAS member states to respond effectively to threats to security in the Americas.”

4 1. The Secretariat for Multidimensional Security (SMS) Cont.
The SMS consists of the Executive Office of the Secretary for Multidimensional Security, and the following entities: Executive Secretariat of the Inter-American Drug Abuse Control Commission, with departmental status; Secretariat of the Inter-American Committee against Terrorism, with departmental status; and, Department of Public Security. The Secretariat serves the following 17 political bodies:

5 SMS Secretariat for Multidimensional Security GS
Specific Funds 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 SMS Secretariat for Multidimensional Security CSH Committee on Hemispheric Security PC Permanent Council GA General Assembly Summits GS General Secretariat MISPA REMJA Las obligaciones de la SSM vienen de mandatos que nos son provistos por: la Comisión de Seguridad Hemisférica Que a su vez los recibe del Consejo Permanente que también puede mandatarnos directamente El Consejo Permanente, a su vez, es mandatado por la Asamblea General Y esta, en muchos casos, lo es por el proceso de Cumbres También recibimos mandatos directos de la Secretaría General, como en el caso de la Orden Ejecutiva que acabamos de resumir Y la Secretaría General puede recibir mandatos directos de la Asamblea General que deben ser ejecutados por la Secretaría Y lo mismo puede ocurrir con relación al proceso de cumbres Además recibimos mandatos de las Reuniones de Ministros en Materia de Seguridad de las Américas Y de la Reunión de Ministros de Justicia y Procuradores Generales Para cumplir nuestras obligaciones debemos, igualmente, interactuar con otros Órganos Políticos, Reuniones de Autoridades Nacionales, Entidades de la OEA, Grupos Técnicos, Grupos de Trabajo y Mecanismos de Evaluación. Específicamente con: La Comisión Interamericana para el Control del Abuso de Drogas El Comité Interamericano contra el Terrorismo La Junta Interamericana de Defensa La Convención Interamericana contra la Fabricación Ilícita y Tráfico de Armas de Fuego, Municiones, Explosivos y otros Materiales Relacionados El Plan Hemisférico Contra la Delincuencia Organizada Transnacional Mecanismo de Evaluación Multilateral de la Comisión Interamericana para el Control del Abuso de Drogas El Grupo de Trabajo encargado de Elaborar la Estrategia Regional de Promoción de la Cooperación Interamericana para el Tratamiento de las Pandillas Delictivas El Grupo Técnico sobre Delincuencia Organizada Transnacional La Reunión de Autoridades Nacionales en Materia de Trata de Personas La Reunión de Autoridades Responsables de las Políticas Penitenciarias y Carcelarias La Reunión de Especialistas Forense Las Reuniones de los Grupos de Expertos en Reducción de la Demanda de Drogas Las Reuniones de los Grupos de expertos en Lavado de Activos Las Reuniones de los Grupos de Expertos en Tráfico Marítimo Y las Reuniones de los Grupos de Expertos en Precursores Químicos Además, y puesto que nuestro presupuesto de operación proviene en un 89.44% de recursos específicos, debemos relacionarnos con diversos donantes a fin de poder conseguir los recursos necesarios para llevar a la práctica los mandatos proveniente de todas las fuentes que les acabo de describir. Finalmente, debemos mantener relaciones con otros organismos y agencias internacionales como UNODC o SICA para desempeñar nuestro trabajo. En los programas y procesos de los Departamentos que siguen a continuación podrán ver en mayor detalle estos procesos.

6 2. SMS Programs and Processes
Executive Office of the Secretariat for Multidimensional Security Under the Office of the Secretary for Security are two processes that support: 1) the ESCA-SICA Strategy; and 2) the CARICOM Strategy on Crime and Security. Similarly, under the Office of the Secretary for Security, and with the technical support of its departments, follow-up is provided for two highly political processes under the Central American MAS Initiative: The Process of Social Pacification and Reduction of Violence, based on the Truce among Gangs in El Salvador (two dialogue processes in Honduras and Guatemala, still in their very early stages, are based on this Process). The Process to Support the Public Security Reform Commission in Honduras.

7 Office of the Secretary for Multidimensional Security
Title of the Process: MAS CENTRAL AMERICA: PILLAR OF MONITORING AND POLITICAL SUPPORT Description PROCESS OF MONITORING AND POLITICAL SUPPORT Funds received: $366,890.50 Executing agency: OFFICE OF THE SMS SECRETARY, WITH THE TECHNICAL SUPPORT OF ITS DEPARTMENTS Process for Social Pacification and Reduction of Violence based on the El Salvador Truce among Gangs Process for Support of the Public Security Reform Commission in Honduras Dialogue on social pacification processes in Honduras and Guatemala (preliminary stage) Achievements and challenges: El Salvador: OAS support in this process has made it possible to consider the best way to deal with on the most difficult security problems in the countries of the northern triangle of Central America. A change in thinking has been noted among the key actors—the government and part of society—multilateral organizations, and the international community, that opens the possibility of recourse to approaches other than repression or a “hard-handed approach,” and now contemplates more comprehensive measures involving rehabilitation, reinsertion, and restorative justice. As a result, other countries in the region are considering embarking on similar processes (case of Honduras). Honduras: After spending over a year working with the Honduran Public Security Reform Commission, where support was given to devising plans of action of the Commission and to technical processes for preparing recommendations for reform of the entire judicial system, among others, this Thursday, October 17, 2013, the agreement of the political parties was achieved, through their presidential candidates, and the first Political Pact for Security in Honduras was signed. In both cases, the greatest challenge has been to obtain substantial and sustainable financing to ensure the continuing support of the GS/OAS.

8 2. SMS/CICTE Programs PROTECTION OF CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE
BORDER CONTROLS Airport Security Security of Documents and Fraud Prevention Immigration and Customs Maritime Security Implementation of UNSCR 1540 PROTECTION OF CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE Cyber-Security Security for Tourism Security of the Supply Chain Security for Major Events STRENGTHENING STRATEGIES FOR EMERGING THREATS Response to Emerging Threats Crisis Management Exercises (CBRNE) LEGISLATIVE ASSISTANCE AND combating THE FINANCING OF TERRORISM Legislative Assistance Fight against Financing of Terrorism INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION AND ALLIANCES

9 2. SMS/CICAD Programs MULTILATERAL EVALUATION MECHANISM
SUPPLY REDUCTION Anti-Drug Intelligence Control of Chemicals Drug-trafficking Border Control Control of Synthetic Drugs Control of Pharmaceuticals Control of Drug-Trafficking DEMAND REDUCTION Comprehensive Prevention Systems Treatment Standards and Protocols Crack Cocaine in the Southern Cone PROCCER INSTITUTION-BUILDING National Drug Policies SAVIA (Health and Life in the Americas Treatment courts as an alternative to imprisonment for drug-dependent offenders Reinsertion of drug-dependent offenders, reducing the gap Legislation on Drugs in the Americas (LEDA) CONTROL OF MONEY-LAUNDERNG Training on Money-Laundering for Judicial Officers Financial Intelligence Units Training on Money-Laundering for Law Enforcement Agencies Strengthening of capital investment systems, management of seized and confiscated assets in Latin America-(BIDAL) Maintenance, protection, and disposal of seized and confiscated assets Regional Center for Training on Money-Laundering Control (Peruvian Program) INTER-AMERICAN OBSERVATORY ON DRUGS Drug information networks Latin American Epidemiology Network Inter-American Drug Use Data System (SIDUC) Alliances with universities in Latin America and the Caribbean International Program for Drug Research Capacity-building for professionals in the health field

10 2. SMS/CICAD Programs (Cont.)
PROCESS OF SUPPORT FOR POLITICAL BODIES Regular Meetings of CICAD Expert Group on Demand Reduction Expert Group on Chemical Substances and Pharmaceutical Products Expert Group on Maritime Drug-Trafficking Expert Group on Money-Laundering Control

11 Department of Public Security
Explanatory note: After various changes in the leadership of the Department of Public Security, in April 2013 a new director was appointed following a competitive selection process. Subsequently, the Department created a new strategic plan, including a new organizational structure and programs for implementation during the period, as follows.

12 2. SMS/DPS Programs PROCESS OF SUPPORT TO POLITICAL BODIES
Committee on Hemispheric Security Meetings of Ministers responsible for Public Security (MISPA) Meetings of Subsidiary Technical Groups of MISPA Conferences of the States Parties of CIFTA Meetings of the CIFTA Consultative Committee Meetings of the CIFTA Working Groups Meetings of National Authorities in the area of Trafficking in Persons Conference of the States Parties of CITAAC Meetings of the CITAAC Contact Points Meetings of Penitentiary and Prison Authorities (within the framework of REMJA) Meetings of Forensic Specialists (within the framework of REMJA) Meetings of Authorities on Transnational Organized Crime

13 2. SMS/DPS Programs (Cont.)
SECURITY AND JUSTICE PROGRAM Inter-American Network for Training and Professionalization of the Police Prevention of crimes linked to irregular migration Development and implementation of a Police Code of Ethics Model for promotion of alternatives to imprisonment Closing the gap for drug violators (together with CICAD) Updating the baseline of Central American prison systems (within the framework of ESCA) Evaluation of National Security Systems Compendium of national legislation on gangs Strengthening institutions specializing in assistance and protection for victims of violence generated by organized crime in Central America (El Salvador-Guatemala-Honduras) CRIME AND VIOLENCE PREVENTION PROGRAM Comprehensive Crime and Violence Prevention Project Prevention of Crimes related to Irregular Migration (component of “Prevention”) Project on gang intervention by strengthening communities Prevention of gender violence and promotion of social inclusion in the police Social Rehabilitation and Reinsertion Project CRIME AND VIOLENCE REDUCTION PROGRAM Comprehensive Action against Anti-personnel Mines in Communities in Colombia External component of quality management for humanitarian mine-clearing in Colombia Assistance to survivors of mines in Colombia Assistance to survivors of mines in Ecuador and Peru Support for management and destruction of firearms and education on their risks in Latin America and the Caribbean Assistance for the management and destruction of arsenals (ammunition) in Central America Capacity-building in destruction and deactivation of ammunition and explosive devices Strengthening of security forces, immigration officers, prosecutors, and judges to prevent and combat trafficking in persons, especially women and children Domestic servants and labor exploitation: strategic coordination between government and civil society for comprehensive protection of victims Assistance in management and elimination of chemical precursors in Guatemala Assistance in management and elimination of chemical precursors in El Salvador, Honduras , and Belize Security and community development in municipalities affected by armed violence in Central America PUBLIC SECURITY INFORMATION PROGRAM Inter-American Citizen Security Information Network Implementation of UNODC – OAS Survey on Crime Trends (CTS) System of comparable indicators in Latin America and the Caribbean

14 3. SMS Organizational Structure and Human Capital
SMS Secretariat for Multidimensional Security Staff Local CPR 75 45 30 TOTAL SMS 151 5 - 1 CICTE Inter American Committee against Terrorism CICAD Inter American Drug Abuse Control Commission DPS The Department of Public Security 14 - 10 35 5 4 21 40 16

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18 FR 10 FE 6 ICR 3 Assoc 2 CPR 16 Local - FE 40 Total 77
DEPARTAMENTO DE SEGURIDAD PUBLICA (FR) Assistant to the Director OFFICE OF THE DIRECTOR PAULINA DUARTE (FR) Director (ICR) Senior Financial Officer (FR) Financial Officer (ICR) Administrative Assistant CRIME AND VIOLENCE REDUCTION PROGRAM (UNIT) Section Head (FE- Dec/13) Project Manager (FR) Project Manager(FE-Mar/14) Project Manager(FR) Project Manager(FE-Dec /13) Project Assistant (FE-CPR-Dec /13) AICMA/CO Field Coordinator (FE-Dec /13) AICMA/CO – Team: 24 staff + 12 CPRs (FE-Dec /13) PACAM/CA Field Coordinator (FE- Jun /14) PACAM/CA –Team: 9 staff + 1 CPR (FE- Jun /14) AICMA/EC-PE Field Coordinator (FE- Jun /14) AICMA/EC-PE Team: CPR (FE- Jun /14) (FE-CPR Nov / 13) Communications and Design Consultant FR 10 FE 6 ICR 3 Assoc 2 CPR 16 Local - FE 40 Total 77 PROGRAM (UNIT) OF SUPPORT TO POLITICAL BODIES Assistant Director(FR) Specialist (FR) SECURITY AND JUSTICE PROGRAM (UNIT) Section Head(FE-Dec /13) Project Manager(FR) Project Manager(Associate) CRIME AND VIOLENCE PREVENTION PROGRAM (UNIT) Section Head (FE-Dec /13) Project Manager(FE- Aug /14) Project Manager (FR) PUBLIC SECURITY INFORMATION PROGRAM (UNIT) Section Head(FR) Project Assistant(FE-CPR-Nov/13) Notes: FR=Regular Fund; FE=Specific Funds; ICR=Indirect Cost Recovery; Dates=Completion of contracts.

19 5. Principal Achievements: 2012-2013
Omnibus Resolution In 2012, SMS collected $22.5 million in specific funds, for a 28% increase over the funds received in By the end of 2013, it expects to receive $27.15 million. Honduras – Process of Dialogue to begin a possible process for reduction of gang violence El Salvador – Process of social peace-making and reduction of violence, based on the truce among gangs in El Salvador Drug Report Participation in WEF Evaluation of National Security Systems in CA, to provide information to implementation initiatives with a greater impact

20 5. Principal achievements in 2012-2013 (CICTE)
In cyber-security, three national cyber-incident response teams (CSIRTs) were created, for a total of 18 to date, and the design and construction of a mobile cybernetic laboratory was developed, used in six cyber crisis simulation exercises in the Americas. Three member states have adopted national cyber-security strategies. In tourism security, 1,200 government workers were trained and networks of cooperation were generated between the public and private sector in the places where they were trained, global and regional agencies, such as the Pan-American Health Organization and the UN World Tourism Organization, and specialized agencies such as the FBI. An inter-American network of tourism security experts was initiated, and they exchanged best practices in the training courses. Over 200 public agents in 29 member states have been trained in security for major events. A national network of focal points was established, to promote an exchange of information and best practices, and a virtual tool was created (Knowledge Management System (KMS) for this exchange of information and knowledge among national focal points. A cooperation project with organizations in Qatar has been initiated. Under the maritime security program, 13 ports were evaluated, and more than 7,900 government workers were trained on access controls, cargo control, inspection of containers, controls and security of passengers, maritime controls, contingency plans, and crisis management, in support of member states and their law enforcement personnel within port facilities. Another 302 immigration and customs officers were trained. The travel documents security program has carried out 33 activities and trained 855 agents in document examination, identity management, and principles of comprehensive border management. INTERPOL statistics have confirmed the impact of the training provided by SMS/CICTE, resulting in a significant increase in participation and use of INTERPOL data bases by the agencies responsible for border control in member states.

21 5. Principal achievements in 2012-2013 (CICTE)
Six hundred agents were trained in airport security, during 18 national programs and 6 subregional courses on protection of airports in the area of security of passengers, cargo, and airport facilities, in accordance with ICAO international standards. Under the Emerging Threats (Biosecurity) Program, four training exercises were carried out using drills and panels of international experts, where over 250 persons from four different countries were trained. Nine technical visits were conducted in support of the practical exercises in which best practices were shared, and seminars were given to more than 170 participants. Under the Program on Legislative Assistance and Countering Financing of Terrorism, over 420 agents were trained during 13 technical assistance and training activities (on a national and subregional level), as well as nine activities organized by other partner organizations, which requested the Secretariat’s technical support. Support was provided for legislative processes involving measures to counter terrorism and its financing in four countries of the Hemisphere. Under the program to implement United Nations Resolution 1540, over the past year the National Plan of Action of both Mexico and Colombia were developed and finalized, with the support of the CICTE Secretariat. In addition, stage II of the Mexican project for implementation of the plan began with the organization of two workshops for around 80 agents.

22 5. Principal achievements in 2012-2013 (CICAD)
Report on the Drug Problem in the Americas—a comprehensive, pioneering report mandated by the Summit presidents, which has opened a new dialogue on drug policy in the hemisphere. Keeping drug users out of prison and under supervised treatment. The model of drug treatment courts expanded through five pilot projects in four Latin American countries, while five more member states are making preparations. The first class of students graduated from the program in 2013 in Trinidad and Tobago. Completion of the first scientific handbook on monitoring and evaluation of drug treatment courts with a hemispheric approach. Training and certification of drug treatment and prevention service providers (PROCCER) -- important advances in Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean, through the Federation of Latin American Therapeutic Communities (FLACT - 19 member states), and the Federation of Brazilian Therapeutic Communities (FEBRACT). Strengthening of the scientific basis for policy development—expansion of drug information networks in Central America and the Caribbean. Management of forfeited assets—expansion of comprehensive technical assistance (BIDAL) to five additional countries. Management of new frontiers of the drug problem—expansion of training on internet sales and controls on chemical precursors. Enhancing multilateral evaluation– compliance of member states with the Plan of Action and Hemispheric Drug Strategy through the Sixth Round of the Multilateral Evaluation Mechanism. Innovative management—use of the new professional exchange program to attract talented personnel in the area of drug control, in the rotation of the CICAD Executive Secretariat. Close cooperation with the United Nations, the European Drug Observatory, and drug cooperation initiatives of the European Union in Latin America.

23 6. Principal lines of action for 2014 (CICTE)
Make headway towards the objective of comprehensive border management, by improving inter-institutional coordination and practices among entities responsible for maritime borders, airports, and land and virtual borders. Consolidate progress made in cyber-security, and complete the establishment of cyber-incident response teams (CSIRTs), and develop national strategies in member states that do not yet have them. Contribute to preparing, training, and developing cooperation among member states to cope with emerging digital threats, and to information and communications technology, with a view to making the region a model in this area.  Assist member states in increasing their capacity to prevent, cope with, and mitigate traditional and emerging threats to their critical infrastructure, and especially government institutions and key sectors for development, such as transportation, energy, finance, and communications, as well as security for tourism and its infrastructure. Mobilize traditional and alternative financing needed to at least partially meet the growing demands for support and training by member states. Obtain the support of the International Center for Sports Security and the Qatar government for a Hemispheric Conference on Sports Security. Under the maritime security program, focus on security in the supply chain, comprehensive risk management, use of the APEC manual to implement practices and exercises, crisis management, and mechanisms for resilience and resumption of trade, in support of security and development.

24 6. Principal lines of action for 2014 (CICTE)
Evaluate the Authorized Economic Operator programs in support of security for the supply chain, create plans of action to develop these programs, and conduct technical assistance missions to support implementation of the plans of action, to facilitate an exchange of good practices both regionally and globally. Create a virtual platform for agents responsible for issuance, control, and verification of identity and travel documents, meet the growing demand for training, and promote the importance of INTERPOL data bases, such as SLTD and DIAL-DOC. Assist member states in preparing or updating national aviation security programs, in compliance with ICAO standards, and strengthen their capacity to identify risks presented by air passengers and cargo to aviation security, by using methods and techniques that do not require technology. Expand training in tourism security, especially by preparing evaluations and security and crisis management plans, and by strengthening public-private networks, analyzing specific risks and threats, and training trainers. Promote inter-regional cooperation to prevent, respond to, and mitigate incidents affecting biosecurity, and promote the creation of a permanent regional capability for linking knowledge, methodologies, information, and experiences. Continue with the implementation of phase 2 of the program for implementation of UN Security Council Resolution 1540 in Mexico and Colombia, and initiate phase 1 in Panama. Pursue implementation of the anti-terrorist financing program, by providing assistance to develop or amend national legislation on anti-terrorism and build the capacity of criminal justice and police agents, as well as financial intelligence analysts, to conduct efficient investigations and trials.

25 Principal lines of action for 2014 (DPS)
Based on the explanatory note under DPS programs and on the strategy created and expanded in 2013, the principal lines of action of DPS for are presented below: Prevention of Crime and Violence; Professionalization of Police Management; Reduction of Violence; and, Professionalization of Compilation, Analysis, and Dissemination of Information on Public Security (for further information: For the immediate future, to ensure the successful implementation of the strategy, an effort will be made to strengthen the Department of Public Security in the area of financial resources, human resources, and technological resources. Likewise, an emphasis will be placed on developing alliances between member states, the private sector, and civil society. Finally, member states will be encouraged to examine the possibility of maintaining different political processes.

26 6. 2014 Lines of Action (CICAD)
Dialogue / follow-up on the “Declaration of Antigua” of the Report on the Drug Problem in the Americas. Strengthening evidence-based public policies by preparing a new publication on drug use trends in the Americas. Evaluate compliance of member states in implementing the Hemispheric Drug Strategy and Plan of Action: publication of reports for the sixth round of the Multilateral Evaluation Mechanism. Intensify work on alternatives to imprisonment for drug-dependent offenders, by expanding the drug treatment courts initiative and research into other alternatives to imprisonment. Begin or consolidate, as applicable, the discussion on policies for social reinsertion strategies (complete the First Manual on Social Reintegration for Policy Makers). Support institution-building through technical assistance, updating and reviewing national drug plans, and drug-related legislation in member states. Further professionalization and specialization in the area of drug prevention and treatment by training and certifying human resources and accrediting programs and institutions based on minimum quality standards. Build the capacity of authorities involved in combating money laundering and related crimes; improve the effectiveness of international cooperation; and, develop systems of extinction of dominion. Implement health-based initiatives in cooperation with the Pan-American Health Organization (PAHO). Further analyze and provide technical assistance for new challenges presented by synthetic drugs and new psychoactive substances.

27 7. Proposal for reorienting OAS activities
CICAD has comparative advantages, a history of achievements, minimal possibilities for duplication of efforts, and strong ties with member states in all six areas of interest: Reduction of supply Reduction of demand Policy development / institution-building Evidence-based drug policies (Observatory) Multilateral Evaluation Asset laundering

28 Annexes CICTE Programs and Subprograms CICAD Programs and Subprograms
DPS Programs and Subprograms

29 ANNEX A: SMS/CICTE Programs
BORDER CONTROLS Airport security Document security and fraud prevention Immigration and Customs Maritime security Implementation of UNSCR 1540 PROTECTION OF CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE Cyber-security Tourism security Security of the supply chain Security for major events STRENGTHENING STRATEGIES FOR EMERGING THREATS Response to emerging threats Crisis management exercises (CBRN) LEGISLATIVE ASSISTANCE AND EFFORTS TO COUNTER FINANCING OF TERRORISM Legislative assistance Countering terrorism financing INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION AND ALLIANCES

30 Cyber Security $1,582,140 Executor: CICTE Description Objectives
Strengthen the capacity of member states to prevent, detect, and respond to cyber-security threats and incidents, increasing awareness and assisting states to generate appropriate tools and provisions to deal with them. Objectives Short-term: Train officials in use of current tools and techniques to prevent, detect, and mitigate the effects of a cyber attack. Medium-term: Create systems in member states in which each interested party cooperates to create a secure and sound national digital environment. Long-term: Ensure that all OAS member states have the knowledge, tools, policies, and infrastructure to serve as a model in dealing with cyber challenges in the global community. OAS Mandates AG/RES (XXXII-O/02); AG / RES (XXXIV-O/04); CICTE/DEC.1/12 rev. 1 Funds Received $1,582,140 Executor: CICTE Principal achievements Design and construction of a mobile cyber-laboratory to be used in six simulations of cyber-crises in the Americas. Creation of three additional national cyber-incident response teams, for a current total of 18 out of the 34 OAS member states. Official adoption of three cyber security strategies, for a total of 5 of the 34 OAS member states. Challenges: Lack of sustainable financial resources. Institutional coordination difficulties in member states that hamper efforts to progress jointly in preventing, mitigating, and responding to cyber-security threats. Lack of established procedures and highly trained staff to manage cyber-security incidents.

31 Security for Major Events
Description The project aims to establish and promote a permanent cooperation mechanism involving OAS member states for planning and protection of major events. The program, through the CICTE/UNICRI “IPO Americas” Initiative, is designed to contribute to development of strategies, mechanisms, and tools to prevent criminal activity during and after major events. Objectives Short-term: Contribute to the development of security strategies to protect major events and prevent crime. Medium-term: Consolidate and further develop synergies among countries that participate in IPO Americas, and promote comprehensive mechanisms to prevent crime related to major events in the region. Long-term: Promote security at major events, through crime prevention, creating permanent capacity, and sharing best practices and experiences, for the benefit of the region as a whole. OAS Mandates: AG/RES (XXXII-O/02) (article 16) ; Declaration of Security in the Americas (paragraph 23); AG/RES (XXXVI-O/06) Funds received $ 1,558,066 Executor: CICTE Principal achievements Over 200 officers in 29 OAS member states have been trained. The National Network of Focal Points (NFPs) has been set up, to promote the exchange of information, best practices, methodologies, and tools for planning security at major events in OAS member states. The Knowledge Management System (KMS) has been designed, established, and maintained; it is a secure virtual tool to promote the exchange of information and knowledge among national focal points. Challenges: In order to continue promoting comprehensive mechanisms to prevent crime, organized crime, and acts of terrorism related to major events in the region, new funding sources are needed.

32 Security of Travel Documents and Fraud Prevention
Description Strengthen security in the issuance and control of travel and identity documents in OAS member states Objectives Short-term: Improve the capacity of member states to prevent and detect the use of altered or fraudulent identity documents. Medium-term: Strengthen the capacity of member states to meet international standards for security in issuance and control of travel documents. Long-term: Promote the development of comprehensive national identity management systems and their security, as well as more effective control over the use of these documents. OAS Mandates: AG/RES (XXXII-O/02), AG/RES (XXXVI-O/06), CP/RES 908 (1567/06) Funds received $1,237,587 Executor: CICTE Principal achievements Between 2012 and 2013, 33 activities were carried out and 855 agents were trained under the program, in areas such as examination of documents, identity management, and comprehensive management of borders. The participation and use of INTERPOL data bases by border control agencies increased in member states. This information was confirmed by INTERPOL statistics. Civil registries participated in subregional workshops to promote the importance of mother documents in the chain of issue of secure travel documents. Challenges: Improving the program in terms of financial stability. Lack of coordination among national agencies (police, customs, immigration, passports, civil registry), in sharing information and access to one another’s data bases. Failure to recognize the importance of security in civil registry processes and documents, as the issuing agencies of mother documents (documents used to obtain a passport).

33 Airport Security $ 741,032.52 CICTE Executor: Description Objectives
Build the capacity of member states to prevent and combat illicit interference in civil aviation, in accordance with the standards recommended by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). Objectives Short-term: To optimize national preparation and response plans, based on threats to civil aviation, in accordance with the ICAO Annex 17 standards. Medium-term: Improve systems for warning and response to incidents at airports, and exchange information among national and subregional security agencies, in accordance with ICAO standards. Long-term: Improve national and regional inter-institutional coordination among border-control aviation security agencies, and develop appropriate norms and security systems, in accordance with ICAO standards. OAS Mandates: AG/RES (XXXII-O/02) ; AG/RES (XXXV-O/05) ; AG/RES (XXXV-O/05) ; AG/RES (XXXVI-O/06) ; AG/RES (XXXVII-O/07) ; AG/RES (XXXVIII-O/08) Funds received: $ 741,032.52 Executor: CICTE Principal achievements 600 agents were trained in 18 national programs and 6 subregional courses on airport protection in the areas of security of passengers, cargo, and airport facilities, in accordance with ICAO international standards regarding illicit interference. 82 scholarships were granted to facilitate the participation of government agents in regional ICAO programs on crisis management, inspections and certification of inspectors and instructors in the area of airport security. 30 experts were trained to develop training exercises in their own countries and airports. Challenges: More financial support is needed to train and develop a network of regional instructors. Ensuring that aviation security programs based on international standards are implemented by all member states and included in the corresponding national regulations.

34 Maritime Security $ 2,027,043 CICTE Challenges: Description Objectives
Provide technical assistance and training to member states to help them meet the standards of the International Maritime Organization (IMO) and other international standards for port security. Objectives Short-term: Increase the number of maritime security agents, risk assessment specialists, emergency management and first-response personnel in the public and private sectors, as well as government agents instructed on the International Ship and Port Facility Security Code (ISPS). Medium-term: Enhance regional harmonization of policies and procedures on maritime security standards to follow more closely international maritime standards and develop plans, procedures, and policies based on international standards. Long-term: Develop port and maritime security in the Americas, by strengthening the capacity of member states to combat terrorism, crime, and other threats to ports in the Americas, and mitigating vulnerabilities, and protecting the transportation of passengers, the flow of trade, and the international maritime system and its infrastructure. OAS Mandates: AG/RES (XXXIX-O/09); AG/RES.2618 (XLI-O/11); AG/RES (XLII-O/12) Funds received: $ 2,027,043 Executor: CICTE Principal Achievements Compliance with international maritime security standards, such as the IMO Ship and Port Facility Security Code, has improved, and working relations with port security institutions in member states have been strengthened. 13 ports were evaluated and over 7,900 government agents were trained in the area of controls on access, cargo and containers, passenger security, maritime dominion, contingency plans, and crisis management, in support of member states and their customs agents, and in compliance with the law prevailing within port facilities. Challenges: Expand the program to respond to the wide range of needs of member states in the area of port and maritime security, including the identification of vulnerabilities and building capacity to protect their supply chains, and resume commercial activity in the event of a crisis affecting the maritime dominion. New financial resources are needed to meet the requirements of member states in the key area of port and maritime security, which is strategic not only from the standpoint of security, but also for the economy and development.

35 Tourism Security $ 656,005 Executor: CICTE Description Objectives
The program is geared to security personnel of the public and private sector and other stakeholders in the tourism community, with a focus on training and promoting partnerships between the two sectors to prevent and mitigate security risks and threats. Objectives Short-term: Identify threats, vulnerabilities, and risks at each location, and needs for training in tourism security. Medium-term: Improve emergency preparedness and risk management in the tourist industry, by promoting prevention and contingency plans in the face of risks. Long-term: Promote an exchange of information and best practices by creating networks linking tourist security in the regions. OAS Mandates: DECLARATION ON SECURITY IN THE AMERICAS  (Mexico,2003); OEA/Ser. L/X.2.5 Declaration of Port-of-Spain, (Trinidad  Tobago, 2005); OEA/Ser. L/X.2.6 Declaration of San Carlos (Bogotá,  2006); OEA/Ser. L/X.2.7 Declaration of Panama (2007); CICTE Work Plan,2006; CICTE Work Plan, 2012 Funds received $ 656,005 Executor: CICTE Principal Achievements 1,200 public (tourism police) and private (security managers) agents were trained to prevent and respond to tourism security risks. Networks of cooperation were generated between the public and private sectors at training sites, and also with specialized agencies such as the FBI, regional organizations such as the Pan-American Health Organization, and international organizations such as the UN World Tourism Organization. An inter-American network of tourism security experts was initiated, to conduct panels to exchange best practices in training courses. Challenges: Need to identify funds to expand the program and launch a second stage.

36 Immigration and Customs Security
Description Strengthen the capacity of government border control agents to prevent and combat potential acts of terrorism and illegal international trafficking, and improve inter-institutional coordination for joint action to this end. Objectives Short-term: Train border control agents in risk management and prevention of the illegal flow of goods and persons. Medium-term: Increase communication and coordination among border officials on a regional level. Long-term: Improve and codify coordination among national border control entities. OAS Mandates: AG/RES (XXXII-O/02); AG/RES (XXXV-O/05); AG/RES (XXXVIII-O/08) Funds received $365,513 Executor: CICTE Principal Achievements 302 agents from seven member states were trained during this period. Seven training exercises were carried out in the region to improve coordination among agencies. Relations were established between agents of border agencies at subregional level. Challenges: Lack of cooperation among border control agencies. A greater need for technical resources and for a reduction in the high turnover in recipient countries.

37 Legislative Assistance and Combating Terrorism Financing (LACTF)
Description 1. Legislative assistance; and 2. Combating Terrorism Financing Objectives Short-term: Offer legislative assistance to develop or amend national legislation on anti-terrorism and to build the capacity of criminal justice officers and police, and financial intelligence analysts, to conduct efficient investigations and trials in cases involving terrorism and its financing. Medium-term: National anti-terrorist laws consistent with the universal and regional legal framework against terrorism adopted by member states. Investigations and trials in cases involving terrorism and its financing conducted efficiently and according to best international practices. Long-term: Harmonization of anti-terrorist legislation in the Hemisphere and improvement of regional and international cooperation in this area. OAS Mandates: CICTE Work Plan and the CICTE VIII Declaration,  “Strengthening Hemispheric Cooperation to Counter Terrorism Financing and Money Laundering.” Funds received: Executor: CICTE Principal Achievements Over 420 agents were trained during this period in 13 technical assistance and training activities (at national and subregional levels), and in 9 activities organized by other partner organizations of the program that requested the Secretariat’s technical support. Support was also provided to legislative and regulatory processes in the area of counter terrorism and its financing in four countries in the Hemisphere, the most recent one being Dominica. Challenges: New financial resources are needed to continue developing the program, as are human resources with specialized knowledge to implement it. Greater political interest in developing or reforming laws against terrorism is needed in some member states, in accordance with their international obligations.

38 Implementation of UNSCR 1540
Description Support for implementation of UN Security Council Resolution 1540 (2004) Objectives Short-term: Strengthen the capacity of member states to prevent, combat, and react against the use of nuclear, biological, chemical, or radiological (NBCR) materials by nonstate actors, on the basis of the needs and challenges identified by states in their national action plans for implementation of UNSCR 1540. Medium-term: Implement all of the activities included in the national action plans, thereby improving compliance with UNSCR 1540 in the beneficiary countries and strengthening the system for prevention of the undue use of NBCR materials. Long-term: Regional harmonization of NBCR material prevention systems and strengthening of regional and international cooperation in this area. OAS Mandates: CICTE Work Plan, and General Assembly Resolution “Advancing Hemispheric Security: a multidimensional approach” [AGAG/RES.2735 (XLII-O/12)], operative paragraph 31. Funds received $236, 124 Executor: CICTE Principal Achievements During the past year, both the Mexican and the Colombian national action plans were developed and finalized, with the support of the CICTE Secretariat. In addition, phase II of the Mexican project for implementation of the plan began with the organization of two workshops for training around 80 Mexican agents. Challenges: To implement phase II of the program (implementation of national action plans) in Mexico and Colombia, new financial resources and human resources with a specialized knowledge are needed. The political interest of Mexico and Colombia, and of other countries that could benefit from the program in 2014, should be confirmed by their governments, by decisive support in the form of resources allocated to the project and by efforts to overcome difficulties in coordination with other participants in the program, such as donors and strategic partners.

39 Response to CBRN Emerging Threats: Exercises/Workshops on Crisis Management
Description Strengthening the response capacity and coordination of member states against emerging threats, such as incidents related to biosecurity and others. Practical simulation exercises are conducted together with foreign experts on the subject and representatives of all the government agencies potentially affected by such threats. Objectives Short-term: Conduct practical risk management exercises with a view to identifying vulnerabilities in the response system. Medium-term: Support the authorities of member states in designing a national strategic emergency response plan. Long-term: Develop a better understanding of the risk of bioterrorism and create a permanent capacity in the region to improve mitigation, management, and response of member states in the case of such risks. OAS Mandates: AG/RES.1840 (XXXII-O/02); AG/RES (XXXVIII-O/08); CICTE/RES. 1/08 Resolution Funds received $992,325 Executor: CICTE Principal Achievements Four practical training exercises were carried out with drills and presentations by international experts, attended by over 250 persons from four different countries. Nine technical visits were conducted in support of practical activities in host countries, during which best practices were shared and seminars were given to more than 170 participants. Assistance was give for preliminary development of permanent plans for response to bioterrorist attacks in all countries in which practical exercises were developed, thereby building the regional capacity in this area. Challenges: A shortage of infrastructure materials, technical knowledge, and an appropriate legislative framework so that the competent authorities in each member state can respond effectively to possible risks related to biosecurity. A shortage of financial resources to carry out the optimum number of projects needed to strengthen effectively the response capacity in the case of incidents related to biosecurity on a regional level.

40 Security of the Supply Chain
Description Support the development of Authorized Economic Operator programs in member states to strengthen the security of the regional and global supply chain, combat the illegal flow of goods, and facilitate legitimate trade. Objectives Short-term: Provide technical assistance to develop programs for certification of Authorized Economic Operators (AEOs) in the Americas. Medium-term: Work together with the World Customs Organization (WCO) and the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) to facilitate the exchange of good practices for authorized economic operators regionally and globally. Long-term: Support the harmonization of Authorized Economic Operator programs in the Americas and create agreements of mutual recognition. OAS Mandates: AG/RES (XXXII-O/02), AG/RES (XLII-O/12): CICTE/DEC. 1/10 Declaration on Public-Private Cooperation in Counter-Terrorism Funds received: $199,706 Executor: CICTE Principal Achievements The project is in its initial phase. Implementation will begin at the end of 2013. Challenges: Lack of investment in the program for Authorized Economic Operators. Lack of participation and commitment on the part of the private sector.

41 ANNEX B: SMS/CICAD Programs
MULTILATERAL EVALUATION MECHANISM SUPPLY REDUCTION Anti-drug intelligence Control of Chemicals Border control of drug-trafficking Control of synthetic drugs Control of pharmaceutical products Control of drug trafficking DEMAND REDUCTION Comprehensive prevention systems Standards and protocols for treatment Crack cocaine in the Southern Cone PROCCER INSTITUTION-BUILDING National drug policies SAVIA (Health and Life in the Americas) Treatment courts as an alternative to imprisonment for drug-dependent offenders Reinsertion of drug-dependent offenders Legislation on Drugs in the Americas (LEDA) COUNTERING MONEY LAUNDERING Training on money laundering for judicial officers Financial Intelligence Units Training on money laundering for law enforcement agencies Strengthening national systems for capital investment, management of seized and forfeited assets in Latin America (BIDAL) Maintenance, protection, and disposal of seized and forfeited assets INTER-AMERICAN OBSERVATORY ON DRUGS Drug information networks Epidemiological network in Latin America Inter-American Drug Use Data System (SIDUC) Alliances with Latin American and Caribbean Universities International program for building capacity for research on drugs by health professionals

42 MULTILATERAL EVALUATION MECHANISM (MEM)
Description The MEM is a multilateral process designed to measure the progress of actions taken by OAS member states to address the drug problem and other related offenses , in accordance with the OAS Hemispheric Drug Strategy . The MEM is governmental and objective , with the participation of specialized experts of each member state in a peer review process which is structured in rounds of two-year cycles. Objectives Short-term: Monitor , improve and evaluate national and hemispheric policies and actions to address the world drug problem. Identify the strengths and weaknesses in each member state, encourage national dialogue and awareness among stakeholders of the drug problem and national drug control policy. Medium-term: Provide opportunities for countries to request assistance for projects related to the fulfillment of assigned recommendations. Long-term: Strengthen policies of members states to combat the problem of drugs and related activities and increase multilateral cooperation , coordination and dialogue in the Hemisphere. OAS Mandates: Second Summit of the Americas (Chile, April 1998) – Founding Mandate Third Summit of the Americas (Quebec City, Canada, April 2001) Fifth Summit of the Americas (Port of Spain, Trinidad, April 2009) Hemispheric Drug Strategy (2010) Plan of Action of the Hemispheric Drug Strategy ( ) Declaration of Antigua 2013 GA Resolutions (most recent: 2013)

43 MULTILATERAL EVALUATION MECHANISM (MEM)
Specific Funds: 2012 411,436 Specific Funds: 2013 496,852 Executor: CICAD Principal achievements Improved national coordination on drug control issues , and increased multilateral cooperation on all aspects of the drug problem. Assignment of over 2,000 recommendations, to 34 member states, the majority of which have been fulfilled or in the process of implementation, in the thematic areas of Institution Building, Demand Reduction, Supply Reduction, and Control Measures. These include recommendations on the ratification of Inter-American conventions, the approval of drug control plans, establishment of drug commissions, the enactment of legislation related to chemical control, establishment of database systems, execution of surveys (secondary school and general population) on drug prevalence, increasing drug prevention programs for specific populations as well as supply reduction training programs for officials, among others. Identification of vulnerabilities in the hemisphere in drug control and areas of improvement to correct deficiencies identified in anti-drug policies. Challenges: To continue to strengthen the capacity of member states to address the drug problem and achieve full implementation of the Hemispheric Drug Strategy and Plan of Action. (Process): Continuity of national experts throughout the evaluation round, and full participation of all member states in the MEM process. Completion of 6th Evaluation Round reports for approval at CICAD 56 in November 2014. Dissemination of the MEM recommendations to all relevant stakeholders and policy makers in member states so they can be used as a road map to strengthen drug control strategies.

44 SUPPLY REDUCTION Description Objectives OAS Mandates
Strengthen the capacity of OAS member states to control, monitor, investigate and interdict the illicit production, transport and trafficking of drugs, the chemicals and precursors used to manufacture them and the control of related contraband. Objectives Short-term: Increase the awareness of officers and officials (drug enforcement, customs, coast guard, regulatory/administrative, chemists, pharmacy/chemical inspectors, prosecutors, judges etc.) regarding new threats and trends related to illicit drug production, trafficking and related activities as new investigative techniques to deal with the foregoing, increasing their capacity to deal with these threats and apply these techniques Medium-term: Increase the technical capacity (operational, tactical, programmatic, legislative/regulatory, policy) to deal with the changing drug-related threats and challenges Long term: Contribute to the Hemispheric effort to reduce reduction illicit production and trafficking of drugs and their overall availability OAS Mandates - OAS Charter (Article 2) - Hemispheric Drug Strategy of 2010 (AG Res 2556 XLO/10) and its Plan of Action - Declaration of Antigua, Guatemala “For a Comprehensive Policy Against the World Drug Problem in the Americas” AG/DEC. 73 (XLIII-0/13) - Advancing Hemispheric Security: A Multidimensional Approach AG/RES (XLIII-0/13)

45 SUPPLY REDUCTION 776,595 Specific Funds 2012 897,555
Executor: CICAD Principal achievements Expansion of activities of the Counterdrug Intelligence Training School of the Americas (ERCAIAD) in Latin America and preliminary efforts to establish a parallel initiative for the Caribbean Introduce new programs to deal with new threats or present new investigative techniques to respond to the foregoing (“Jetway”, investigation of internet sales of drugs, private sector involvement in drug control in ports and supply chain, etc.) Increased credibility and respect for the capacity and work of the section among peers and partner agencies and entities Challenges: Responding to the needs and demands of member states with limited resources (financial and human) in an environment of constant change and challenges with new drugs, trafficking methods, chemicals etc.

46 Anti-drug Intelligence
Description Program to increase the capacity, knowledge, and competence of the officers of member states in specialized techniques in the development and analysis of anti-drug intelligence. Also to improve the capacity to respond to the threats and challenges of drug-trafficking and drug production. Objectives Short-term: Increase the capacity of counterdrug intelligence officers and others working in this area to gather information, then develop, analyze and apply the resultant intelligence Medium-term: Strengthen the technical capacity of institutions in member states tasked with the development, analysis and use of counter-drug intelligence for strategic or operational purposes and in the development of programs and policies related to the control of drugs Long-term: Strengthen the capacity of member states to develop, analyze and apply counter-drug intelligence, to adopt a common approach to doing so and move to an environment of greater cooperation, coordination and information exchange in counter-drug efforts OAS Mandates: - OAS Charter (Article 2) - Hemisphere Drug Strategy of 2010 (AG Res 2556 XLO/10) and its Plan of Action - Declaration of Antigua Guatemala “For a Comprehensive Policy Against the World Drug Problem in the Americas” AG/DEC. 73 (XLIII-0/13) - Advancing Hemispheric Security: A Multidimensional Approach AG/RES (XLIII-0/13)

47 Antidrug Intelligence
Specific Funds: 2012 246,189 Specific Funds: 2013 233,272 Executor: CICAD Principal Achievements Delivery of 3 (four-week) comprehensive and accredited regional counter-drug training seminars each year delivered in Bogota in partnership with the Colombian National Police and other international entities Delivery of 4 (two-week) regional or national training seminars each year in selected OAS member states concerning specific counterdrug techniques or issues Undertaking consultations and preliminary work to establish a similar regional counterdrug intelligence training school initiative for the Caribbean Challenges: Responding to the needs of member states regarding counter-drug intelligence training The complex and prolonged process to move forward with a regional training initiative in the Caribbean

48 Control of Chemicals Description Objectives OAS Mandates:
Program for officers of the police, customs, and regulatory and administrative agencies, as well as chemists, judges, prosecutors, and others working for agencies responsible for control of chemical products. The goal is to increase knowledge and skills of the administrative processes and specialized operational techniques needed to safely and effectively monitor, investigate, detect, and control chemical products that could be used to produce illicit drugs. Objectives Short-term: Increase the awareness of officials and officers concerning how chemicals are used in the illicit production of drugs, how they are diverted for this purpose, the techniques that they should apply to safely monitor, investigate and interdict chemical diversion and use in illicit drug production Medium-term: Increased capacity of national competent authorities, drug enforcement and customs agencies and others concerned with the control of chemicals and illicit drug production to have in place the necessary, policies, programs, regulatory/administrative processes and system and legislation/regulation to control chemicals Long-term: Decrease the international and domestic diversion of chemicals for use in illicit production of drugs with increased international and inter-agency cooperation and coordination of control activities through but not limited to pre-export notification, information exchange, join operations and other mechanisms OAS Mandates: - OAS Charter (Article 2) - Hemisphere Drug Strategy of 2010 (AG Res 2556 XLO/10) and its Plan of Action - Declaration of Antigua Guatemala “For a Comprehensive Policy Against the World Drug Problem in the Americas” AG/DEC. 73 (XLIII-0/13) - Advancing Hemispheric Security: A Multidimensional Approach AG/RES (XLIII-0/13)

49 Control of Chemicals Specific Funds: 2012 130,037 Specific Funds: 2013
283,211 Executor: CICAD Principal Achievements Delivery of multiple national and regional training seminars on chemical diversion and the use of chemicals in the illicit production of drugs Providing current information on chemical diversion and use of chemicals in illicit drug production in an environment where new chemicals and processes are being developed for illicit drug production at a rate that challenges control officials; where traffickers are resorting to uncontrolled chemicals that serve as pre-precursors in the production process The work of the Group of Experts on Chemical Substances and Pharmaceutical products that has served to identify new threats and challenges related to these substances at an early stage and develop resources and guides to help member states deal with these threats. Challenges: Ensuring that officers have the knowledge and skills to safely deal with toxic and potentially lethal chemicals with little or no safety equipment

50 Border Control of Drug-Trafficking
Description Program for officers of the police, customs, and other agents responsible for control of land borders, airports, and ports. The purpose is to increase the knowledge, skills, and capacity to monitor, investigate, guide, detect, and intercept the smuggling of illegal drugs at these international points of entry. Objectives Short-term: Increased awareness and capacity of counter-drug and customs officers as well as others to monitor, investigate and interdict the movement of drugs, chemicals and other related contraband across international borders and at sea by conveyances or carried by individuals Medium-term: Increased capacity of agencies, ministries and other entities to have in place the necessary policies, legislation, programs, operations and technical/operational assets to limit the movement of drugs, chemicals and related contraband across international borders Long-term: Contribute to the reduction in smuggling of drugs, chemicals and related contraband with increased international and inter-agency cooperation OAS Mandates: - OAS Charter (Article 2) - Hemisphere Drug Strategy of 2010 (AG Res 2556 XLO/10) and its Plan of Action - Declaration of Antigua Guatemala “For a Comprehensive Policy Against the World Drug Problem in the Americas” AG/DEC. 73 (XLIII-0/13) - Advancing Hemispheric Security: A Multidimensional Approach AG/RES (XLIII-0/13)

51 Border Control of Drug-Trafficking
Specific Funds: 2012 38,617 Specific Funds: 2013 283,211 Executor: CICAD Principal Achievements Delivery of a variety of national and regional training seminars to officers from member states on a range of subjects related to techniques to monitor, investigate and interdict the smuggling of drugs, chemicals and related contraband Implementation of a successful program to increase business sector engagement and involvement in supply-chain security and reduce the potential for legitimate cargos to be used to transport drugs Challenges: Responding to the needs of member states in this area with limited resources

52 Control of Synthetic Drugs
Description Program on synthetic drugs, directed to public agents responsible for law enforcement and its regulatory and administrative processes, as well as professionals in the chemical sector, prosecutors, judges, and others involved in their control, to generate awareness of this growing problem, improve skills, knowledge, and capacity to monitor, detect, and prevent, in a sure way, the production and illegal trafficking of synthetic drugs, and to respond to the emergence of new drugs, production techniques, and methods of illicit trafficking. Objectives Short-term: Increased awareness among officers and officials as to how synthetic drugs are produced and the knowledge and capacity to monitor and investigate such cases and to deal with the clandestine laboratories where these drugs are produced with particular attention to issues of officer safety Medium-term: Increased awareness by national competent authorities, drug enforcement and customs agencies and others regarding the growing threat presented by synthetic drugs including New Psychoactive Substances (NPS) and the necessary, policies, programs, regulatory/administrative processes and system and legislation/regulation in place to control these substances Long-term: Contribute to a general increased awareness of the threat posed by synthetic drugs and a corresponding decrease in their availability and use in the hemisphere OAS Mandates: - OAS Charter (Article 2) - Hemisphere Drug Strategy of 2010 (AG Res 2556 XLO/10) and its Plan of Action - Declaration of Antigua Guatemala “For a Comprehensive Policy Against the World Drug Problem in the Americas” AG/DEC. 73 (XLIII-0/13) - Advancing Hemispheric Security: A Multidimensional Approach AG/RES (XLIII-0/13)

53 Control of Synthetic Drugs
Specific Funds Synthetic drug activities carried out within other projects of the section Executor: CICAD Principal Achievements Delivery of various national and regional seminars on the production and trafficking of synthetic drugs The work of the Group of Experts on Chemical Substances and Pharmaceutical products that has served to identify new threats and challenges related to these substances at an early stage and develop resources and guides to help member states deal with these threats. Challenges: Ensuring that officers have the knowledge and skills to safely deal with toxic and potentially lethal chemicals used to produce these substances with little or no safety equipment Trying to deal with an environment where the focus has been on the traditional, plant-based drugs and where most member states are ill-prepared to deal with the flood of synthetics and NPS

54 Control of Pharmaceuticals
Description Program to increase the capacity of officers of the police, customs, and regulatory and administrative agencies, as well as chemists, judges, prosecutors, and others, to control pharmaceuticals subject to diversion, trafficking, and abuse. The program also seeks to improve the skills and knowledge of these officers to reduce diversion of said products, while at the same time ensuring their availability for legitimate medical or scientific purposes, and to respond to new trafficking techniques, such as internet sales. Objectives Short-term: Increased awareness among officers and officials regarding the control and diversion of drugs (pharmaceuticals) intended for medical or scientific purposes that have psychoactive properties Medium-term: Increased awareness by national competent authorities, drug enforcement and customs agencies and others regarding the growing problem of pharmaceuticals diversion either from legitimate or licit channels or through new means such as the internet and the necessary, policies, programs, regulatory/administrative processes and system and legislation/regulation in place to control these substances Long-term: Contribute to a reduction of the diversion and trafficking of pharmaceutical drugs (both real and counterfeit) and a corresponding reduction in the health implications of such trafficking and use OAS Mandates: - OAS Charter (Article 2) - Hemisphere Drug Strategy of 2010 (AG Res 2556 XLO/10) and its Plan of Action - Declaration of Antigua Guatemala “For a Comprehensive Policy Against the World Drug Problem in the Americas” AG/DEC. 73 (XLIII-0/13) - Advancing Hemispheric Security: A Multidimensional Approach AG/RES (XLIII-0/13)

55 Control of Pharmaceuticals
Specific Funds: 2012 250,436 Specific Funds: 2013 - Executor: CICAD Principal Achievements Delivery of a series of national and regional seminars in the techniques to investigate the sale of drugs over the internet. Conduct preliminary work in the development of a model curriculum and training program for pharmacy inspectors in the Caribbean The work of the Group of Experts on Chemical Substances and Pharmaceutical products that has served to identify new threats and challenges related to these substances at an early stage and develop resources and guides to help member states deal with these threats Challenges: Our training program on the investigation of drug sales over the internet has been extremely effective in increasing awareness, generating action by member states and generating a demand for more training for which resources are limited

56 Control of Drug-Trafficking
Description Program to improve the capacity, skills, and knowledge of officers (police, customs, marine and coastguard, etc.), in special investigative techniques for the purpose of effectively monitoring, investigating, and intercepting cases of illicit drug production and trafficking. Objectives Short-term: Increased awareness among officers and officials regarding changes in drug trafficking and new techniques and approaches that are being used to deal with the foregoing and an increased capacity to apply these techniques Medium-term: Increased technical capacity of agencies and institutions to have in place officers with the necessary skills and knowledge to deal with a constantly changing environment that requires new approaches to achieve success in counterdrug efforts Long-term: To contribute to an overall increased capacity among member states to effectively control and reduce illicit drug trafficking, production and availability OAS Mandates: - OAS Charter (Article 2) - Hemisphere Drug Strategy of 2010 (AG Res 2556 XLO/10) and its Plan of Action - Declaration of Antigua Guatemala “For a Comprehensive Policy Against the World Drug Problem in the Americas” AG/DEC. 73 (XLIII-0/13) - Advancing Hemispheric Security: A Multidimensional Approach AG/RES (XLIII-0/13)

57 Control of Drug-Trafficking
Specific Funds: 2012 232,276 Specific Funds: 2013 209,550 Executor: CICAD Principal Achievements Delivery of a series of national and international seminars on various counterdrug investigative techniques including human source development and passenger risk management Delivery of a new train the trainer program on passenger risk management with post seminar with participating countries establishing training programs to spread and implement the methodology Challenges: Demand from the member states exceeded the resources available The rotation of officers due to frequent transfers and changes of responsibility, death/injury or other reasons assures a constant flow of officers requiring training in counter-drug investigative techniques

58 ANTI-MONEY LAUNDERING
Description Strengthening AML/CFT systems by developing the institutional capacity of OAS member states in financial, legal, and law enforcement areas. Objectives Short-term: Train judges, prosecutors, law enforcement personnel, and other agents of financial control agencies responsible for enforcing AML/CFT laws. Medium-term: Strengthening the technical capacity of the institutions responsible for preventing and combating ML and FT. Long-term: Contribute to combating money laundering and financing of terrorism in the Hemisphere. OAS Mandates: OAS Charter (Art. 2) Hemispheric Drug Strategy and its Plan of Action. OAS General Assembly Resolution: AG/RES (XXXIV-O/04) OAS General Assembly Resolution: AG/RES (XXXVI-O/06) Hemispheric Plan of Action against Transnational Organized Crime Specific Funds: 2012 1.19 million Specific Funds: 2013 265,793 Executor: CICAD

59 ANTI-MONEY LAUNDERING
Principal achievements Implementation of 12 workshops on asset investigation and forfeiture in 12 Latin American countries, training over 613 public agents in judicial and law enforcement posts. In , the Expert Group on the Control of Money Laundering generated 8 technical documents of key importance in efforts to control and fight ML/FT, on the subject of asset investigation, asset forfeiture, management of forfeited and seized goods, and recommendations for improving AML/CFT systems in member states. The BIDAL (forfeited assets in Latin America) Project extended its scope to cover El Salvador and the Dominican Republic in ; steps are also being taken to implement the project in Colombia, Brazil, and Paraguay in 2014. Challenges: To expand technical assistance and training to more Latin American and Caribbean countries, in legal, financial, and law enforcement areas. To strengthen and/or develop specialized offices for management of forfeited or seized assets, through the BIDAL Project.

60 Strengthening national systems for asset investigation and management of seized and forfeited assets in Latin America (BIDAL) Description The purpose of this program is to strengthen the technical capacity of member states in the area of investigation, seizure, forfeiture, management, and disposal of assets proceeding from drug-trafficking and money-laundering crimes. One of the focal points of the BIDAL Project is to work on site with the countries involved in the project, first to identify their strengths and weaknesses in the asset forfeiture process, which begins with asset investigation to identify, locate, and seize the assets, and then to identify gaps and problems in the processes of receiving, safekeeping, and management of the seized goods, and their subsequent destination, in accordance with the domestic legislation of the countries. Objectives Short-term: To prepare situational evaluations of the asset seizure systems in the countries where the program is implemented and present proposals for improving the system. Medium-term: To provide technical assistance to governments of member states to strengthen and improve the investigation, seizure, forfeiture, management, and disposal of assets and gains proceeding from drug trafficking and money laundering activities. Long-term: To strengthen national drug systems by consolidating income from additional funds proceeding from the disposal of assets seized from drug-traffickers, to finance national and international programs in response to the drug phenomenon.

61 Strengthening national systems for asset investigation and management of seized and forfeited assets in Latin America (BIDAL) OAS Mandates: Hemispheric Drug Strategy and its Plan of Action. Specific Funds: 2012 140,349 Specific Funds: 2013 56,180 Executor: CICAD Principal achievements Presentation of 2 situational evaluations of asset forfeiture systems in El Salvador and Dominican Republic. Presentation of a proposal for improvement and legal reforms in El Salvador. Preparation of 2 technical documents: a legislative guide for establishing offices to manage forfeited assets; and a guide for self-evaluation of asset forfeiture systems in OAS member states. Challenges: Extending the BIDAL Project to more member states interested in improving and/or developing their asset forfeiture systems in Latin America and the Caribbean.

62 Program for training in maintenance, protection, and disposal
of seized and forfeited assets Description The purpose of this program is to ensure better maintenance, protection, and disposal of forfeited and seized assets. Experts from the United States (US Marshals), Colombia, Costa Rica, Mexico, and Spain, and regional experts instruct the officers of asset management offices, police officers, and prosecutors in each country. The focus is on international recommendations (such as the OAS Model Regulations), guidelines, and best practices in management of seized assets (best practices of the G-8), enforcement of national asset forfeiture laws, asset management planning, evaluation of inventories and performance measures, and appropriate use of funds from forfeited assets, to improve law enforcement and supervision of the internal control of funds from forfeited assets. Objectives Short-term: Train agents in asset management offices, police officers, and prosecutors in each country. Medium-term: Improve the coordination of the different agencies in charge of asset investigation, forfeiture, and seizure in member states. Long-term: Develop the asset forfeiture systems in member states. OAS Mandates: Hemispheric Drug Strategy and its Plan of Action.

63 Program for training in maintenance, protection, and disposal
of seized and forfeited assets Specific Funds: Funds recorded under the BIDAL Project Executor: CICAD Principal Achievements Training of more than 600 public agents of asset management offices, police officers, and prosecutors in every country covered by the project. The program is in 12 OAS member countries, thus ensuring greater regional and subregional cooperation in asset forfeiture. Challenges: To continue strengthening asset forfeiture systems and international cooperation among member states.

64 Money-Laundering Training Program for Judicial Officers
Description The purpose of the program is to train judges and prosecutors in the area of money laundering. The training covers the following topics: (i) typology and logistics of the crime of money laundering; (ii) international legal framework and principles regulating money laundering; (iii) national legislation on money laundering; (iv) procedural and criminal aspects related to cases of money laundering; (v) international judicial cooperation; (vi) Financing of terrorism. This program contains the following components: Simulated cases Workshops for judges and prosecutors. Objectives Short-term: Train judges and prosecutors responsible for prosecuting and judging ML crimes. Medium-term: Strengthen the technical capacity of judicial officers. Long-term: Contribute to combating money laundering and financing of terrorism in the Hemisphere. OAS Mandates: Hemispheric Drug Strategy and its Plan of Action. OAS General Assembly Resolution AG/RES (XXXIV-O/04) Specific Funds: 2012 549,474 Specific Funds: 2013 - Executor: CICAD Principal Achievements Over 300 officials, including judges, prosecutors, and other judicial officers, trained in investigation, indictment techniques and conducting trials in money laundering cases. Over 300 officials, including judges, prosecutors, and other judicial officers, trained in the theoretical foundations of money laundering and jurisprudence, to examine practical problems involved in the analysis, investigation, and judgment of cases related to money laundering, financing of terrorism, and drugs, by country. Challenges: To improve the effectiveness of court proceedings. To improve the statistics on final convictions for ML crimes.

65 Training Program for Financial Intelligence Units
Description This program is aimed at establishing and/or strengthening Financial Intelligence Units, by giving them the legal, administrative, and IT tools and human resources required for control of money laundering, and thus at improving the analytical capacity of the FIUs by training in management of intelligence analysis tools and use of information technology to collect, store, analyze, and deliver information. This program contains the following components: workshops on analysis, links, and relationships; specialized courses on forensic accounting and analysis of financial intelligence; and, workshops to promote dialogue between the public and private sectors in the area of AML/CFT. Objectives Short-term: Analysts, investigators, supervisors, and enforcement officers trained in analysis of financial intelligence data. Medium-term: Improve the analysis of economic and financial intelligence data by the Financial Intelligence Units. Long-term: Strengthen the Financial Intelligence Units for effective detection of suspicious operations. OAS Mandates: Hemispheric Drug Strategy and its Plan of Action. OAS General Assembly Resolution: AG/RES (XXXIV-O/04) OAS General Assembly Resolution: AG/RES (XXXVI-O/06)

66 Training Program for Financial Intelligence Units
Specific Funds: 2012 155,171 Specific Funds: 2013 - Executor: CICAD Principal Achievements Consolidate the systems for identification, detection, and reporting of suspicious operations, from the reporting parties to the Financial Intelligence Units, as well as the methodologies for analysis of this information by the FIUs. Continuously train FIU agents in the region in techniques for analysis of financial intelligence and investigation of money laundering cases based on the information sent by the reporting entities. Challenges: Improve mechanisms for interaction between FIUs and law enforcement agencies, to effectively and efficiently use the information that the agencies produce in ML/FT investigations. Strengthen channels for the exchange of information, experiences, and good practices in management of information among FIUs in the region.

67 Training Program on Money Laundering for Law Enforcement Agencies
Description The purpose of this program is to provide training in strategic tecniques useful in asset investigation, to help reduce and identify the source of these serious criminal activities, and better monitor money laundering crimes and other related criminal activity, and to improve seizure and due safe-keeping or custody of the assets and other evidence related to these crimes. By developing this program, the law enforcement agencies will be in a position to improve their operations and devise an effective response to these crimes. This program contains the following components: simulated investigations; workshops on special investigation techniques; a methodological investigation plan; and, a methodological program for strengthening the custody chain. Objectives Short-term: Prosecutors, investigative police officers, and FIU analysts trained in the financial investigation of ML cases. Medium-term: Methodological investigation plans developed and implemented in the countries involved in the program. Long-term: Technical capacity-building of the governments of member states to combat and prevent money laundering and financing of terrorism. OAS Mandates: Hemispheric Drug Strategy and its Plan of Action. OAS General Assembly Resolution: AG/RES (XXXIV-O/04) OAS General Assembly Resolution: AG/RES (XXXVI-O/06)

68 Training Program on Money Laundering for Law Enforcement Agencies
Specific Funds: 2012 218,238 Specific Funds: 2013 - Executor: CICAD Principal Achievements Over 315 agents, including prosecutors, investigative police officers, and FIU analysts trained to conduct financial investigations in ML/FT cases. A methodological investigation plan developed and implemented in Peru. Challenges: To develop and implement methodological investigation plans in OAS member states to improve the effectiveness of operational and asset investigations in cases of ML/FT. To extend the program to all OAS member states.

69 Regional Training Center for Control of Money Laundering (Peruvian Program)
Description Objectives Short-term: Judges, prosecutors, investigative police officers, FIU analysts, and law enforcement officers trained in special investigative techniques, oral proceedings, and prosecution of money laundering cases. Medium-term: Building the technical capacity of the Peruvian government to combat and prevent money laundering and financing of terrorism. Long-term: Help combat money laundering and financing of terrorism in Peru. OAS Mandates: Hemispheric Drug Strategy and its Plan of Action. OAS General Assembly Resolution: AG/RES (XXXIV-O/04) OAS General Assembly Resolution: AG/RES (XXXVI-O/06) Specific Funds: 2012 - Specific Funds: 2013 Executor: CICAD Principal achievements Over 369 public agents, including judges, prosecutors, investigative police officers, FIU analysts, and law enforcement officers trained in special investigative techniques, oral proceedings, and prosecution of ML/FT cases. As a result of this program, substantial reforms have been introduced in the Peruvian national law on AML/CFT. To improve the effectiveness of the scope of judicial proceedings. Challenges: To improve statistics on final judgments in ML cases.

70 INSTITUTION BUILDING Short-term: Medium term: Long-term:
Description Objectives Short-term: Medium term: Long-term: OAS Mandates: Specific Funds: 2012 Specific Funds: 2013 Executor: CICAD Principal achievements Challenges:

71 National Drug Policies
Description Objectives Short-term: Medium term: Long-term: OAS Mandates: Specific Funds: 2012 Specific Funds: 2013 Executor: (DPS, CICAD, CICTE) Principal achievements Challenges:

72 SAVIA (Health and Life in the Americas)
Description Objectives Short-term: Medium-term: Long-term: OAS Mandates: Specific Funds: 2012 Specific Funds: 2013 Executor: (DPS, CICAD, CICTE) Principal Achievements Challenges:

73 Drug treatment courts as an alternative to imprisonment
for drug-dependent offenders Description Objectives Short-term: Medium term: Long-term: To establish and/or improve treatment courts as an alternative to imprisonment for drug-dependent offenders. To help reduce crime, drug use, and the prison population in the Americas, by establishing and/or expanding drug treatment courts in OAS member states. OAS Mandates: Specific Funds: 2012 Specific Funds: 2013 Executor: (DPS, CICAD, CICTE) Principal achievements Challenges:

74 Reinsertion of drug-dependent offenders, reducing the gap
Description Contribute to reinsertion of drug-dependent offenders. Build the institutional capacity of member states of the Americas to treat and reinsert dependent offenders through: (1) Alternatives to imprisonment (2) Treatment in prisons (3) System of community support and programs for reintegration of drug-dependent offenders. Objectives Corto: Mediano OAS Mandates: Specific Funds: 2012 Specific Funds: 2013 Executor: (DPS, CICAD, CICTE) Principal achievements Challenges:

75 Legislation on Drugs in the Americas (LEDA)
Description It has been noted that some national laws on drugs and their subsequent regulations are obsolete or are out of date in terms of their application and objective of reducing drug production, trafficking and use. As part of its institutional development mandate, CICAD has examined the development of laws related to drugs using a comprehensive, multidisciplinary approach, with a view to improving and harmonizing laws on drugs, in accordance with international instruments and CICAD’s Drug Strategy and Plan of Action. According to the 2010 Plan of Action of the Drug Strategy, the Executive Secretariat has the mandate to publish and maintain the drug laws of member states. The LEDA program has fulfilled this mandate, and maintains today the only publicly recognized compendium of legislation on drugs in the Hemisphere; it also includes a collection of the most up-to-date and relevant laws and regulations of the 34 members. Objectives Short-term: Medium term: Long-term: OAS Mandates: Specific Funds: 2012 Specific Funds: 2013 Executor: (DPS, CICAD, CICTE) Principal achievements Challenges:

76 INTER-AMERICAN OBSERVATORY ON DRUGS
Description Area of statistics, information, and scientific research of CICAD. Assists countries to improve collection and analysis of data on drugs. Objectives Short term: Technical and scientific training for an exchange of experiences among professionals in the area of drugs Medium term: Promote the development and establishment of national observatories and use of data and standardized methods Long term: Help member states to improve their capacity to compile and analyze statistics related to drugs OAS Mandates: OID Mandate from the CICAD Commission, 1999 Final Report of the Twenty-sixth Regular Session of CICAD (CICAD/doc. 1039r1) General Assembly Resolution: 2004 (AG/RES 2015 – XXXIV-O/04), 2005 (AG/RES a), 2006 (AG/RES 2198 – XXXVI-O/06) and, 2009 (XXXIX-O/09). Specific Funds: 2012 897,823 Specific Funds: 2013 534,230 Executor: CICAD Principal Achievements Development and strengthening of national observatories Publication of epidemiological studies and statistics on drugs Dissemination of information on drugs Challenges: Limitations of infrastructure and human resources in national drug observatories Limitations in the continuity of financing

77 DRUG INFORMATION NETWORKS
Description Develop the capacity to collect, analyze, and report information on drugs by creating drug information networks in the Cariibbean and in Central America. Objectives OAS Mandates Specific Funds: 2012 401,842 Specific Funds: 2013 443,027 Executor: CICAD Principal Achievements Challenges: Limitations in terms of infrastructure and human resources in the national drug observatories. Limitation in the continuity of financing.

78 STRENGTHENING OBSERVATORIES IN THE AMERICAS
Description Strengthening national observatories on drugs in terms of their capacity to monitor and analyze the drug problem in all of its aspects. Specifically, development of drug information networks nationally both in the Caribbean and in Latin America, and creation of an epidemiological monitoring network – Network of Latin American Researchers on Drugs (REDLA). Objectives Short-term: Improve the capacity of member states to carry out and have access to drug-related investigation and analysis. Medium-term: Contribute to programming through investigation and analysis of the drug phenomenon in the Americas. Long term: Contribute to designing evidence-based drug policies. OAS Mandates: OID Mandate from the CICAD Commission, 1999 Final Report of the Twenty-sixth Regular Session of CICAD (CICAD/doc. 1039r1) Charter of the Organization of America States: Articles 30, 31, 38, 47, 48, 51 y 52. General Assembly Resolution: 2005 (AG/RES a) and 2006 (AG/RES 2198 – XXXVI-O/06). Hemispheric Drug Strategy and Plan of Action Specific Funds: 2012 176,018 Specific Funds: 2013 204,171 Executor: CICAD Principal achievements Analysis of the status of the drug problem in Latin America and the Caribbean. Publication of academic articles with an in-depth analysis. Cooperation between academic institutions and programs for training professionals in drugs. Challenges: Limitations of infrastructure and human resources in national drug observatories. Limitations in the continuity of financing.

79 Inter-American System of Drug Use Data (SIDUC)
Description SIDUC consists of a series of protocols in Latin America and the Caribbean that permit member states to measure the prevalence, incidence, and abuse of drugs in various segments of the population in the Hemisphere. Objectives Short-term: Develop indicators on drugs and implement epidemiological studies. Medium term: Contribute to formulating and improving public prevention and treatment policies and other drug policies. Long term: Develop reliable, objective, timely, and comparable information with a scientific basis on prevalence of licit and illicit drug use, patterns of use, and associated risk factors. OAS Mandates: OID Mandate from the CICAD Commission, 1999 Final Report of the Twenty-sixth Regular Session of CICAD (CICAD/doc. 1039r1) General Assembly Resolutions: 2004 (AG/RES 2015 – XXXIV-O/04), 2005 (AG/RES a), 2006 (AG/RES 2198 – XXXVI-O/06) and 2009 (XXXIX-O/09). 2008 Declaration of Cartagena - Hemispheric Drug Strategy. Specific Funds: 2012 672,352 Specific Funds: 2013 330,059 Executor: CICAD Principal achievements Indicators of prevalence and incidence for studies of the general population, students, and universities. Indicators on drugs and crime, health consequences, and patterns of use in vulnerable populations. Review of scientific and methodological advances. Challenges: Limitations of infrastructure and human resources in national drug observatories. Limitations in the continuity of financing.

80 ALLIANCES WITH UNIVERSITIES IN LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN
Description Promote the strengthening of a critical mass of professionals in drug-related education, research, and extension activities Objectives Short-term: New strategic plan for continuity and maximization of human resources in education, research, and extension activities. Alliances between universities and drug observatories. Medium-term: Cooperation agreements with universities in the Hemisphere to include drugs in their academic and educational activities. Long-term: Train future professionals in health and related fields, in the areas of policy design, research, prevention, and timely care for problematic drug use. OAS Mandates: General Assembly Resolutions: AG/RES (XXXIX-O/09) and AG/RES (XL-O/10). Hemispheric Strategy on Drugs, approved by the CICAD in May Specific Funds: 2012 526,780 Specific Funds: 2013 197,564 Executor: CICAD Principal achievements Regional Training in Research for Professionals in the field of health and related fields (over 100,000 professionals and 1,000 teachers) Creation of university networks in the field of drugs in Latin America (over 50 schools) Inclusion of drug topics in the undergraduate and graduate curricula, including systems for monitoring and evaluation of content (over 200 schools) Challenges: Limitations of infrastructure and human resources in national drug observatories. Limitations in the continuity of financing.

81 International Research Capacity-Building Program on the Subject of Drugs, for Health Professionals
Description International Research Capacity-Building Program for Professionals in the field of health and related areas to study the drug phenomenon in Latin America and the Caribbean (multicentric research). Objectives Short-term: Creation of scientific evidence that describes specific aspects of the drug phenomenon and creation of policies for prevention health promotion, and treatment Medium term: Facilitate an exchange of drug researchers between Latin America and the Caribbean and Canada Long-term: Group of researchers specializing in drugs as support and a basis for creating public policies and training of other professionals in the area of scientific research. OAS Mandates: General Assembly Resolutions AG/RES (XXXVI-O/06) – Nº 5 and AG/RES (XXXVI-O/06) Nº 10 & 11 Specific Funds: 2012 252,592 Specific Funds: 2013 169,591 Executor: CICAD Principal achievements Publication of 8 multicentric reports Training of 91 health professionals in scientific research on drugs Creation of research centers specializing in drugs Challenges: Limitations of infrastructure and human resources in national drug observatories. Limitations in the continuity of financing.

82 DEMAND REDUCTION Description Objectives Short-term: Medium-term:
Long-term: OAS Mandates Specific Funds 2012 Specific Funds 2013 Executor: CICAD Principal achievements Challenges:

83 Comprehensive Prevention Systems
Description Establish and recommend minimum quality standards based on scientific evidence to develop prevention policies and programs, including training for their implementation and an evaluation component, for review of existing national policies and programs. Objectives Short-term: Medium-term: Long-term: OAS Mandates Specific Funds 2012 Specific Funds 2013 Executor: CICAD Principal achievements Challenges:

84 Treatment Standards and Protocols
Description Based on identified needs to deal with different drug-dependent populations, and considering that substance abuse has been declared as a chronic disease with relapses, model protocols and mimimum standards for care are being developed to be specifically adapted and applied in each country. Objectives Short-term: Medium-term: Long-term: OAS Mandates Specific Funds 2012 Specific Funds 2013 Executor: CICAD Principal achievements Challenges:

85 Crack Cocaine in the Southern Cone
Description The objective of this program is to build the capacity of government and nongovernmental institutions in the Southern Cone countries, and provide mechanisms to develop and adapt protocols that are based on scientific evidence and are culturally relevant, in order to prevent and provide comprehensive treatment for children and youth at risk or affected by drug dependency. Objectives Short-term: Medium-term: Long-term: OAS Mandates Specific Funds 2012 Specific Funds 2013 Executor: CICAD Principal achievements Challenges:

86 Drug Training and Certification Program and Prevention of Violence, Treatment, and Rehabilitation (PROCCER) Description The primary objective of the program is to build the institutional and human capacity of member states to maximize the quality of services under drug treatment and prevention programs, through training, technical assistance, and use of technology, and establishment of mechanisms for certification by government authorities. Objectives Short-term: Medium-term: Long-term: OAS Mandates Specific Funds 2012 Specific Funds 2013 Executor: CICAD Principal achievements Challenges:

87 ANNEX C: SMS/DPS PROGRAMS AND PROCESSES
PROCESS OF SUPPORT TO POLITICAL BODIES Committee on Hemispheric Security Meetings of Ministers Responsible for Public Security (MISPA) Meetings of l Subsidiary Technical Groups of MISPA Conferences of the States Parties of CIFTA Meetings of the Consultative Committee of CIFTA Meetings of CIFTA Working Groups Meetings of National Authorities on Trafficking in Persons Conferences of the States Parties of CITAAC Meetings of Contact Points - CITAAC Meetings of Penitentiary and Prison Authorities (within the framework of REMJA] Meetings of Forensic Specialists (within the framework of REMJA) Meetings of Authorities on Transnational Organized Crime

88 Department of Public Security
Programs and Processes SUPPORT FOR POLITICAL BODIES Description PROCESS OF SUPPORT FOR POLITICAL BODIES Objectives Short-term: Implement assigned mandates Medium term: Facilitate and improve coordination, implementation, and follow-up on tasks based on mandates of different political bodies Long-term: Contribute to the coordination, iimplementation, and follow-up on tasks based on mandates of political bodies OAS Mandates: Total cost: N/A Executor: (DPS) DPS serves as the technical secretariat in the following forums: Committee on Hemispheric Security, Meetings of Ministers Responsible for Public Security (MISPA), Meetings of Subsidiary Technical Groups of MISPA, Conferences of States Parties to CIFTA, Meetings of the CIFTA Consultative Committee, Meetings of the CIFTA Working Groups, Meetings of National Authorities on Trafficking in Persons, CITAAC Conferences of the States Parties, Meetings of CITAAC Contact Points, Meetings of Prison and Penitentiary Authorities (in the framework of REMJA), Meetings of Forensic Specialists (in the framework of REMJA), Meetings of Authorities on Transnational Organized Crime. Achievements and challenges: Supply of inputs for preparing work plans/programs, final documents, draft resolutions Encourage member states to preside over/lead/accommodate the different processes Identify the resources needed to hold meetings at and outside headquarters

89 ANNEX C: SMS/DPS Programs (Cont.)
SECURITY AND JUSTICE PROGRAM Inter- American Network for Training and Professionalization of the Police Prevention of crimes linked to irregular migration Development and implementation of a Police Code of Ethics Model for promotion of alternatives to imprisonment Closing the gap for drug offenders (together with CICAD) Updating of the baseline for Central American prison systems (in the framework of ESCA) Evaluation of national security systems Compendium of national legislation on gangs Building of Institutions specializing in assistance and protection of victims of violence generated by organized crime in Central America (El Salvador-Guatemala-Honduras) CRIME AND VIOLENCE PREVENTION PROGRAM Comprehensive Crime and Violence Prevention Project Prevention of crimes related to irregular migration (component of “Prevention) Project for gang intervention through community-building Prevention of gender violence and promotion of social inclusion in the police Social Reinsertion and Rehabilitation Project CRIME AND VIOLENCE REDUCTION PROGRAM Comprehensive action against antipersonnel mines in communities in Colombia External component of quality management for humanitarian demining in Colombia Assistance to survivors of mines in Colombia Assistance to survivors of mines in Ecuador and Peru Support for management and destruction of firearms and education against their risks in Latin America and the Caribbean Assistance for the management and destruction of arsenals (ammunition) in Central America Capacity building in destruction and deactivation of ammunition and explosive devices Strengthening of Security forces, migration officials, prosecutors, and judges to prevent and combat trafficking in persons, especially women and children Domestic servants and labor exploitation: strategic coordination between government and civil society for comprehensive protection of victims Assistance for management and elimination of chemical precursors in Guatemala Assistance for management and elimination of chemical precursors in El Salvador, Honduras and Belize Security and community development in municipalities affected by armed violence in Central America PUBLIC SECURITY INFORMATION PROGRAM Inter-American Citizen Security Information Network Implementation of UNODC – OAS survey on crime trends (CTS) System of comparable indicators in Latin America and the Caribbean

90 SECURITY AND JUSTICE US$44,914,000 US$200,000 Description
PROGRAM FOCUSED ON BUILDING THE LAW ENFORCEMENT CAPACITY OF MEMBER STATES Objectives Short-term: Build the internal capacity of the DPS to private technical assistance to member states in the area of security and justice Medium-term: 1) Train and link up police officers through an inter-American training and professionalization network; 2) Promote prison and penitentiary policies geared to the reintegration and resocialization of the inmates, and develop and promote alternatives to imprisonment; and 3) Help member states in developing legislation on security and justice. Long-term: Build the institutional capacity of member states in the area of security and justice. OAS Mandates: Total cost: US$44,914,000 Funds received to date US$200,000 Executor: (DPS) Principal projects under the program Inter-American Network for Training and Professionalization of the Police Prevention of crimes linked to irregular migration Development and implementation of a Police Code of Ethics Model of promotion of alternatives to imprisonment Closing the gap for drug offenders (together with CICAD) Updating the base line of Central American penitentiary systems (within the framework of ESCA) Evaluation of national security systems Compendium of national legislation on gangs Building institutions specializing in assistance for and protection of victims of violence generated by organized crime in Central America (El Salvador-Guatemala-Honduras) Achievements and Challenges: 5.8 % of the program is being implemented, 94.12% of the program is in the socialization and fund-raising stage.

91 PREVENTION OF CRIME AND VIOLENCE
Description PROGRAM FOCUSED ON BUILDING THE CAPACITY OF MEMBER STATES TO PREVENT CRIME AND VIOLENCE Objectives Short-term: Build the capacity of the SMS Department of Public Security in the area of crime and violence prevention Medium-term: With the support of member states, identify the steps to take to begin implementing the crime and violence prevention program Long-term: Contribute to the reduction and/or mitigation of risks associated with situations of violence and/or crime, and advance citizen security in member states. OAS Mandates: Total Cost: US$23,000,000 Funds received to date US$266,265 Executor: (DPS) Principal projects under the program Comprehensive crime and violence prevention project Prevention of Crimes related to Irregular Migration (component of “Prevention”) Project for intervention in gang through community building Prevention of gender violence and promotion of social inclusion in the police Social rehabilitation and reinsertion project Achievements and challenges 1.05% of the program is financed and being implemented 3.04% of the program is approved by the donor and implementation will begin in 2014 95.9% of the program is in the socialization and fund-raising phase.

92 REDUCTION OF CRIME AND VIOLENCE
Description PROGRAM FOCUSED ON BUILDING THE CAPACITY OF MEMBER STATES TO REDUCE CRIME AND VIOLENCE Objectives Short-term: Reduce the impact of firearms, ammunition, explosives, antipersonnel mines, trafficking in persons, and other manifestations of violence. Medium- term: Mitigate and reduce the different manifestations of violence against individuals and the community Long –term: Promote a community of nations with the capacity to protect its citizens and communities against threats presented by instruments and agents of violence and insecurity OAS Mandates: Total Cost: US$54,000,000 Funds received to date US$3,032,684 Executor: (DPS) Principal projects under the program Comprehensive action against anti-personnel mines in communities in Colombia External Component of Quality Management for Humanitarian Demining in Colombia Assistance to Survivors of Mines in Colombia Assistance to Survivors of Mines in Ecuador and Peru Support for Management and Destruction of Firearms and Education against their Risks in Latin America and the Caribbean Assistance for the Management and Destruction of Arsenals (Ammunition) in Central America Capacity Building in Destruction and Deactivation of Ammunition and Explosive Devices Strengthening Security Forces, Immigration Officers, Prosecutors, and Judges to Prevent and Combat Trafficking in Persons, especially Women and Children Domestic Servants and Labor Exploitation: Strategic Coordination between Government and Civil Society for Comprehensive Protection for Victims Assistance for Management and Elimination of Chemical Precursors in Guatemala Assistance for Management and Elimination of Chemical Precursors in El Salvador, Honduras , and Belize Security and Community Development in Municipalities Affected by Armed Violence in Central America Achievements and Challenges:

93 INFORMATION ON PUBLIC SECURITY
Description PROGRAM FOCUSED ON BUILDING THE CAPACITY OF MEMBER STATES TO MANAGE INFORMATION ON PUBLIC SECURITY Objectives Short-term: Build the capacity of the SMS Department of Public Security to compile, analyze, and disseminate information on public security. Medium term: With the support of member states, identify the steps to take to begin implementing the Public Security Information Program. Long-term: Contribute to compilation, analysis, and dissemination of information on public security, for designing public policies in the Hemisphere. OAS Mandates: Total Cost: US$3’,000,000 Funds received to date: US$68,250 Executor: (DPS) Principal projects under the program Inter-American Citizen Security Information Network Implementation of UNODC – OAS Survey on Crime Trends (CTS) System of comparable indicators in Latin America and the Caribbean Achievements and Challenges


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