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— William Galston, University of Maryland Professor

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1 — William Galston, University of Maryland Professor
If we lived alone, we wouldn’t need the virtues of fairness and compassion. If children could raise themselves, we wouldn’t need the family virtues of commitment and fidelity. If wealth could simply be found, we wouldn’t need the virtues of initiative and industry to create and sustain wealth. If our society were homogeneous, we wouldn’t need the virtues of tolerance and respect for legitimate differences. If our political institutions were authoritarian and a few of us were fit to direct the lives of the rest of us, we wouldn’t need the virtues of personal responsibility and active citizenry. The facts of our social life give us the broad contours of a conception of good character. It is the character required for a democratic society. — William Galston, University of Maryland Professor

2 Smart & Good Report Lickona and Davidson

3 The following questions will be answered:
What is the connection between character education and academic achievement? What can teachers, in general, do to foster good character? What can I, personally, do to promote good character in my students and in my school?

4 4 Foundational Questions:
What is character? What is character education? What is a caring community? What is the role of character in academics-and work in general?

5 —A School Mission Statement
Each of us is gifted with a Unique Potential that defines a destiny. A commitment to character development enables us to achieve personal excellence and find fulfillment in life. We value attitude more than aptitude, effort more than ability, character more than talent.

6 Character education cannot be reduced to a lesson, a course or a slogan posted on school walls. Instead, it must become an integral part of school life. High School Teachers Experiences With Character Education 2002 Study Michael Romanowski Ohio Northern University

7 Down through history, education has always had two goals: to help young people become smart and to become good. —Center for the 4th & 5th R’s, Educating for Character Dr. Thomas Lickona,

8 What is Character?

9 Performance is the outcome (the grade, the honor, the award, the achievement)
Performance character consists of those qualities .(Diligence, perseverance, a strong work ethic, a positive attitude, ingenuity, and self-discipline) needed to pursue our personal best—whether the outcome (is realized or not.

10 Talent is the natural ability we are born with (intellectually, artistically, physically, morally, etc.) Character development is the process by which we develop the dispositions that enable us to maximize our talent potential.

11 A Relational Orientation
Moral Character A Relational Orientation Moral character enables us to treat others—and ourselves—with respect and care and to act with integrity in our ethical lives. Moral character moderates our personal goals to honor the interests of others to ensure that we do not violate moral values such as fairness, honesty and caring as we pursue our performance goals.

12 This concept of character has the potential to transform the culture of school in a way that improves both learning and behavior.

13 What is Character Education?
Character education is the intentional integration of excellence and ethics—in the home, school, workplace, and wider community. Lickona & Davidson

14 A broader definition of character education represents a paradigm shift: from a focus on developing moral character to a focus on developing both performance character and moral character.

15 What is a caring community?
It is a community where we care about each other not only by being kind and respectful, but also by helping each other to do our best work.

16 In this kind of a caring community, there is an expectation that given enough time, effort and support, every student is capable of producing high quality work.

17 Book by Ron Berger An Ethic of Excellence: Building a Culture of Craftsmanship with Students

18 In Berger’s Vision, a Caring Community Provides,,,,,
Work that matters Models of excellence A culture of critique A norm of multiple revisions Opportunities to make one’s work public.

19 Jason’s Story From Ron Berger’s book Illustrates the integration of excellence and ethics and the power of a community where students are not only kind and respectful, but also challenge each other to do their best work - a true caring community.

20 Collective Responsibility
An Ethical Learning Community requires collective responsibility - supporting and challenging others to do their best work and to treat people with care and respect.

21 Character education is the intentional integration of excellence and ethics - on the home, school, workplace and the wider community.

22 Collective Responsibility

23 Two Types of Responsibility
Personal responsibility Collective responsibility

24 Teachers Help Students Develop Both
Helping individual students to develop the motivation and skills to practice self-discipline. Helping students to develop a sense of responsibility toward their fellow class- and schoolmates.

25 Developing Collective Responsibility
Instilling in students the value of careful individual planning, self-assessment and skill development. Providing students with a sense of control over their behavior.

26 Developing Collective Responsibility
Empowering students to understand, monitor and change their behavior. Providing students with a clear sense of what it means to be a member of the class or school. Enabling students to share the responsibility for holding all class members accountable to agreed-upon rules.

27 School as a Community For a classroom to be seen as a positive learning environment, students must believe that they are part of a safe and caring community – both in and out of school. Have students take responsibility for their own actions. Hold each other accountable for following rules.

28 School as a Community Students often fail to see the school as a community, having an intrinsic worth. Thus they justify rules about class attendance, bullying, stealing or cheating solely in terms of how they benefit the individual. Help students to develop appropriate responses that articulate with a clear sense of what it means to be a member of this classroom or school. “That is not how we do things here at ____________ school.” “At our school, we show respect for others.”

29 School as a Community Teachers need to give students that taste of the pleasure of saying “we,” rather than “I.” Saying “we,” the child is aware that a supportive, dependable community is behind him or her. In order to develop the pleasure of saying “we,” teachers must deliberately call students’ attention to the “spirit of the class” or “pride in the school” and seize upon whatever events draw members of a class or a school together as occasions for furthering their collective consciousness.

30 What happens in your classroom? What should happen?
Suppose someone … Is having side conversation instead of listening to the person who’s speaking. Litters the classroom or school grounds. Puts someone down. Asks to copy someone else’s homework. Uses bad language. Cuts class. What happens in your classroom? What should happen?

31 Assessing Collective Responsibility
In your school, do students … Resolve conflicts without fighting, insults or threats? Try to get others to follow the rules? Care if others cheat? Intervene when they see someone being picked on? Help other students choose between what is right and what is wrong?

32 Assessing & Increasing Collective Responsibility
What factors contribute to low levels of collective responsibility in your classroom or school? Brainstorm until no new ideas can be generated. Circle three of the most important factors. Discuss strategies to positively influence each of these factors. Discuss some ways to monitor the progress of the strategies.

33 What is the role of character in academics—and work in general?
There are at least four different roles for character in academics and work. Smart & Good High Schools; Lickona and Davidson

34 1.) We need performance character (effort, attitude, study skills, perseverance) in order to do our best work—in math, science, writing, etc. Smart & Good High Schools; Lickona and Davidson

35 2.) When we strive for excellence in our work, we develop our performance character. We learn to work hard, overcome obstacles, and find joy in a job well done. Smart & Good High Schools; Lickona and Davidson

36 3.) We need moral character (respect, kindness, fairness) in order to create the safe and caring environment required for teaching and learning. Smart & Good High Schools; Lickona and Davidson

37 4.) Through academics we develop our moral character by:
Engaging students in a culture of critique—helping each other do their best work Examining the ethical dimensions of the curriculum Using our knowledge to benefit others (e.g., through community service, democratic citizenship, & servant leadership). Smart & Good High Schools; Lickona and Davidson

38 In this paradigm We need character in order to do academic work.
We develop character through academic work.

39 In this paradigm, we no longer say:
We need to balance character and academics. Test scores are important, but we also care about character. It’s easier to teach character through Language Arts and Social Studies than it is through Math And Science.

40 Instead we say: In every academic subject it is both possible and necessary to develop character - performance character and moral character. This, we believe, is what happens in an Ethical Learning Community.

41 Educating for Good Character
Educating for character is about helping our students cultivate worthy lives. Josephson Institute

42 What Teachers Can Do to Foster Good Character
There are at least seven competencies that teachers need to demonstrate in order to live up to their responsibilities as educators for character. Josephson Institute

43 What Teachers Can Do to Foster Good Character
First, they must be examples of good character to students. While they need not be perfect, they clearly must be working on their own character. Josephson Institute

44 What Teachers Can Do to Foster Good Character
Second, they must see the development of the student’s moral life and character as a professional responsibility and priority. Josephson Institute

45 What Teachers Can Do to Foster Good Character
Third, teachers must be able to engage students in moral discourse about the “oughtness of life”; they must be able to talk with students about what is right and what is wrong in life. Josephson Institute

46 What Teachers Can Do to Foster Good Character
Fourth, teachers must be able to articulate clearly their own positions on a range of ethical issues, while at the same time, not unnecessarily burdening their students with all of their own ethical opinions. Josephson Institute

47 What Teachers Can Do to Foster Good Character
Fifth, teachers must be able to help students empathize with the experiences of others, in effect, helping them to get outside themselves and into the world of others. Josephson Institute

48 What Teachers Can Do to Foster Good Character
Sixth, teachers must be able to establish in their classrooms a positive moral ethos, an environment with high ethical standards, where respect for all is exhibited. Josephson Institute

49 What Teachers Can Do to Foster Good Character
Seventh, teachers must be able to provide students with the opportunity for activities in school and in their communities that will give them the experience and practice in behaving ethically and altruistically. Josephson Institute

50 4 Keys For Developing Performance Character and Moral Character
Self-study Other-study Public performance/presentation A community that supports and challenges.

51 Key: Self-Study Engage in self-monitoring to identify strengths and areas for growth in performance character and moral character. Based on self-assessment, set goals to chart a course for improvement.

52 Key: Other-Study Study and emulate the products and pathways of individuals who demonstrate performance excellence and high moral character. Learn to identify and replicate exemplars’ pathways to success.

53 Key: Public Performance/Presentation
Use public performances—exhibitions, competitions, speeches, concerts, shows, “real-world” work. Make schoolwork public—sharing sample work, presenting to peers, getting feedback from peers, etc.—to heighten students’ responsibility for doing their best work and being their best ethical self.

54 Key: Community That Supports & Challenges
Develop a learning community whose members pursue the realization of their own potential for excellence and ethics, AND help to bring out the best in every other person.

55 We teach who we are. —Parker Palmer

56 Marcellus High School We challenge you to follow your ideals.
We challenge you to make decisions based on integrity, honesty and truth. We challenge you to be thoroughly knowledgeable in your field of interest. We challenge you to be a good neighbor, wherever you may be. Ad by Integrated Industrial, Marcellus, NY

57 We challenge you to be considerate. We challenge you to be consistent.
We challenge you to be humble. We challenge you to be persevering. Meeting these challenges will cause success; We sincerely wish you to be successful. Employees of Integrated Industrial Services, Inc. Marcellus, New York, USA 2000


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