Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Chautauqua Works Summer Youth Employment Program Work Behavior Work Shop.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Chautauqua Works Summer Youth Employment Program Work Behavior Work Shop."— Presentation transcript:

1 Chautauqua Works Summer Youth Employment Program Work Behavior Work Shop

2 Contents Appropriate Attire Appropriate Work Behavior Sexual Harassment Prevention Training Job Safety Disciplinary Action

3 Appropriate Attire What is appropriate and inappropriate attire to wear for work? Uniforms Suits Dresses/Skirts/Dress Pants Skorts Dress Shoes/Open-toed or heeled/gym shoes/work boots T-shirts Tank Tops Halter tops/Tube tops/Spaghetti Strapped Shirts/Midriff Shirts (Shirts that show your tummy)

4 Appropriate Work Behavior Behavior Attitude Social Interaction

5 Appropriate Work Behavior What are some examples of appropriate work behavior? Behavior Punctual Reliable Team Player Attitude Helpful Respectful Patient Social Interaction Friendly Polite Easy Going

6 Appropriate Work Behavior It is essential that all employees accept personal responsibility for maintaining high standards of conduct and job performance, including observance of Chautauqua Works rules and policies. Violations of these standards will result in disciplinary action.

7 Inappropriate Work Behavior What are some examples of inappropriate work behavior? Behavior Coming in Late or Calling in to Work Fighting at Work Dressing Inappropriately Attitude Disrespectful Impatient Interruptive Social Interaction Friendly Polite Easy Going

8 Sexual Harassment Prevention Sexual harassment is a form of sex discrimination that violates Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act as amended in 1972, and the New York State Human Rights Law.

9 Sexual Harassment Prevention Sexual harassment consists of unwanted, unwelcome sexual advances or sexual conduct in the workplace that has the effect of unreasonably interfering with a person's work performance. This type of behavior can create an intimidating or hostile work environment.

10 Sexual Harassment Prevention The goal of eliminating sexual harassment in the workplace must begin with prevention. As an employer we have a responsibility to prevent sexual harassment.

11 Sexual Harassment Prevention To accomplish this goal the Sexual Harassment Prevention Training is offered to: increase your awareness, and provide you with the skills and motivation needed to address issues of sexual harassment.

12 Sexual Harassment Prevention Chautauqua Works is committed to providing a work environment that is free from all forms of discrimination and conduct that can be considered harassing, coercive or disruptive, including sexual harassment. All of its active employees are covered under this policy.

13 Sexual Harassment Prevention Actions, words, jokes or comments based on an individuals sex, race, color, national origin, age, religion, disability, sexual orientation or any other legally protected characteristic will not be tolerated. Chautauqua Works provides ongoing sexual harassment training to ensure that its employees work in an environment free of sexual and other unlawful harassment.

14 Sexual Harassment Prevention Sexual harassment is defined as unwanted sexual advances or visual, verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature. This definition includes many forms of offensive behavior and includes gender-based harassment of a person of the same sex as the harasser.

15 Sexual Harassment Prevention The following is a partial list of sexual harassment examples: *Unwanted sexual advances. *Offering employment benefits in exchange for sexual favors. *Making or threatening reprisals after a negative response to sexual advances. *Visual conduct that includes leering, making sexual gestures or displaying of sexually suggestive objects or pictures, cartoons or posters.

16 Sexual Harassment Prevention The following is a partial list of sexual harassment examples (continued): *Verbal conduct that includes making or using derogatory comments, epithets, slurs or jokes. *Verbal sexual advances or propositions. *Verbal abuse of a sexual nature, graphic verbal commentaries about an individuals body, sexually degrading words used to describe an individual, or suggestive or obscene letters, notes or invitations. *Physical conduct that includes touching, assaulting, following, impeding or blocking movements.

17 Sexual Harassment Prevention Unwelcome sexual advances (either verbal or physical), requests for sexual favors or other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature constitute sexual harassment when: Submission to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of employment; Submission or rejection of the conduct is used as a basis for making employment decisions; or The conduct has the purpose or effect of interfering with work performance or creating an intimidating, hostile or offensive work environment.

18 Sexual Harassment Prevention All allegations of sexual harassment will be quickly and discreetly investigated. To the extent possible, your confidentiality and that of any witnesses and the alleged harasser will be protected against unnecessary disclosure. When the investigation is completed, you will be informed of the outcome of the investigation.

19 Sexual Harassment Prevention If you experience or witness sexual or other unlawful harassment in the workplace, including harassment on the basis of national origin, race, color, religion, age or otherwise, report it immediately to your worksite supervisor, unless you feel it is inappropriate to contact them. You should also notify your Retention Specialist, however, if they are unavailable or you feel that it would be inappropriate to contact them, you may contact the Program Coordinator or the Executive Director.

20 Sexual Harassment Prevention Any worksite supervisor or Retention Specialist who becomes aware of possible sexual or other unlawful harassment must immediately advise the Program Coordinator so it can be investigated in a timely and confidential manner. Anyone engaging in sexual or other unlawful harassment will be subject to disciplinary action, up to and including termination.

21 Sexual Harassment Prevention KEEP IN MIND: It is not the intent of the harasser but the perception of the victim that determines whether behavior constitutes sexual harassment. Any form of retaliation or false reporting is considered unacceptable and violators will be disciplined appropriately, up to and including termination.

22 Workplace Safety You have a right to a safe and healthful workplace. That's why Congress passed the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, requiring employers to provide workplaces free from serious recognized hazards and to comply with occupational safety and health standards. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) wants every worker to go home whole and healthy every day. The agency was created by Congress to help protect workers by setting and enforcing workplace safety and health standards and by providing safety and health information, training and assistance to workers and employers.

23 Workplace Safety Workplace safety is about preventing injury and illness to employees and volunteers in the workplace. It's about protecting the company's most valuable asset: its workers.

24 Workplace Safety Young workers, ages 14-24, are at risk of workplace injury because of their inexperience at work and their physical, cognitive and emotional development characteristics. They often hesitate to ask questions and may fail to recognize workplace dangers.

25 Workplace Safety Each year, teens die from work- related injuries and about 200,000 young workers seek emergency medical treatment.

26 Workplace Safety Common workplace hazards and injuries: Slips, trips and falls Strains and sprains Chemical exposure Burns and cuts Eye injuries Hearing loss Motor vehicle crashes Electrocution Machinery malfunctions

27 Workplace Safety Employee Responsibilities to Protect Yourself Trust your instincts about dangerous situations Follow all safety rules Stay alert Wear proper safety equipment Ask questions about potentially dangerous situations or equipment Tell your Supervisor or Retention Specialist if you suspect unsafe conditions Be aware of your work environment Work safely Stay sober and drug-free Know your workplace rights

28 Workplace Safety Comply with all safety and health standards that apply to your actions on the job. Employees should: Read the OSHA poster at your work site. Follow the employer's safety and health rules and wear or use all required gear and equipment. Follow safe work practices for your job, as directed by your employer. Report hazardous conditions to a supervisor or safety committee.

29 Workplace Safety Planning for emergencies If you have an urgent medical emergency call 911 and tell your supervisor. If you have an un-urgent medical issue, which requires attention, please tell your supervisor and call your retention specialist.

30 Disciplinary Action Disciplinary action is considered a dimension of performance evaluation. It is a corrective process to help employees overcome work- related shortcomings, strengthen work performance and achieve success. In general, disciplinary action is taken in progressive steps. Refer to policy – oral warning, written warning, final written warning-may result in termination.

31 Disciplinary/Termination Policy First Offense: VERBAL WARNING The worksite supervisor informs the Retention Specialist of the incident. The Retention Specialist will evaluate the incident and decide if it constitutes a violation of standards and requirements. Retention Specialist will give a verbal warning to the youth participant as soon as possible after being notified of or witnessing the offense. This will be documented in detail and maintained in the youth participants file for future reference.

32 Disciplinary/Termination Policy Second Offense: WRITTEN WARNING, JOINT MEETING, AND POSSIBLE SUSPENSION When notified of the offense by the worksite supervisor, the Retention Specialist will arrange a consultation with the youth participants Supervisor, the youth and themselves. The youth must attend. During this consultation, all involved will sign a written warning. This will be documented in detail and maintained in the youth participants file for future reference.

33 Disciplinary/Termination Policy Third Offense: WRITTEN WARNING, JOINT MEETING, MAY RESULT IN TERMINATION When notified of the offense by the worksite supervisor, the Retention Specialist will arrange a consultation with the youth participants Supervisor, the youth and themselves. The youth must attend. During this consultation, all involved will sign a written warning. This will be documented in detail and maintained in the youth participants file for future reference.

34 Disciplinary/Termination Policy The following are reasons for immediate termination: Possession of drugs or alcohol at a program site Possession of any weapon Any illegal or dangerous behavior, such as but not limited to: theft, harassment, or careless use of machines and tools ANY BEHAVIOR DEEMED GROUNDS FOR IMMEDIATE DISMISSAL BY THE WORKSITE AND THEIR HUMAN RESOURCE POLICY.

35 Disciplinary Action If an employee is issued a written warning the employees signature is only an acknowledgement that the employee has been informed of the warning; it does not indicate agreement with the warning. All written warnings are retained in the employees file.

36 Disciplinary Action Any warnings will result in a loss of successful completion bonus. Review the policy


Download ppt "Chautauqua Works Summer Youth Employment Program Work Behavior Work Shop."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google