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SPP Indicator 13 : Improving Performance and Student Outcomes Ginger Blalock, Education Contractor Adapted from Dr. Paula Kohlers Guidance National Secondary.

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Presentation on theme: "SPP Indicator 13 : Improving Performance and Student Outcomes Ginger Blalock, Education Contractor Adapted from Dr. Paula Kohlers Guidance National Secondary."— Presentation transcript:

1 SPP Indicator 13 : Improving Performance and Student Outcomes Ginger Blalock, Education Contractor Adapted from Dr. Paula Kohlers Guidance National Secondary Transition Technical Assistance Center, Western Michigan University

2 Topics for This Presentation IDEA 2004 Transition Requirements New Mexico Statutes on Transition Planning State Performance Plan Indicator 13 NSTTAC Indicator 13 Checklist (Form B)

3 Context for Improving Practice Factors Student outcomes IDEA State and local policy Community Effective practices

4 IDEA Accountability Mandates Continuous Improvement Monitoring Process (CIMP) – Compliance with IDEA State Performance Plan (SPP) Annual Performance Report (APR)

5 IEP Transition Planning Requirements – 2004 IDEA Statute - Transition planning in the IEP is required for every student (not gifted): Beginning not later than the first IEP to be in effect when the child is 16, and updated annually thereafter New Mexico Statute: Same requirement but starts no later than 8 th grade or age 14

6 IEP Requirements – IDEA 2004 (aa) appropriate measurable postsecondary goals based upon age appropriate transition assessments related to training, education, employment, and where appropriate independent living skills; (bb) the transition services (including courses of study) needed to assist the child in reaching those goals;

7 State Performance Plan (SPP) and Annual Performance Report (APR) States plan to meet, and states performance on, 19 indicators (Part B) 4 specific to transition: 1.% of youth with IEPs who graduate (on standard pathway to diploma) – collected thru STARS 2.% of youth with IEPs who drop out – thru STARS also 13.% of youth with all transition components in the IEP – collected thru IEP file review by trained reviewer (REC 6) 14.% of youth who achieve post-school outcomes (further learning, employment, or both) – collected by phone or other survey method one year after exit (NEREC 4)

8 Using Transition Indicators to Improve What We Do Post-School Outcomes ~Indicator 14~ Postsecondary education and/or training Employment Independent living Dropping Out ~Indicator 2~ Why? Appropriate programs? Address student and family needs? Graduation ~Indicator 1~ Expectations and standards? Various pathways available? Linkage to post-school environments? Whats the Quality of Our IEPs? ~Indicator 13~ Measurable post-school and annual goals Transition-related assessments Course of study, services, and activities Coordination of services N ot so good? Good? Why? Why Not?

9 Critical Interrelationship Quality IEPs Staying in School Graduating Achieving post- school outcomes

10 Indicator 13 – Content of IEPs Percent of youth aged 16 and above* with an IEP that includes coordinated, measurable, annual IEP goals and transition services that will reasonably enable the child to meet the post-secondary goals. [20 U. S. C (a)(3)(B)] * In N.M., 8th grade or age 14 and above

11 Elements of Transition-Rich IEPs Measurable postsecondary goals Present level of performance – based on age-appropriate assessments Transition activities and services, including course of study Annual transition goals Designated responsibility, including adult agencies

12 A Transition-Rich IEP Transition assessment/Present levels of achievement Annual IEP Transition Goals Long-term activities (e.g., instruction) and services, including course of study Transition services/linkages with designated responsibility & timelines Measurable postsecondary goals

13 A Transition-Rich IEP Measurable postsecondary goals

14 Questions Defining a Measurable Post-School Goal Is it outcome-oriented? Can it be counted (by someone)? Will it occur after the student leaves secondary education? Are goals for education or training AND employment addressed (for most)?

15 Measurable Post-School Goals – Ex: Jamal will work in his uncles printing business upon graduation from high school. Karen will attend KVCC in the medical technology (radiology) program and work in the health care industry after high school. Sophie will work part-time in a retail entertainment store, with assistance from an employment specialist, after graduation.

16 Other Postschool Goal Examples See many more examples and non-examples at website – click on Indicator 13 link – then Training Materials - include discussions of why examples meet IDEAs criteria and why nonexamples are not appropriate.www.nsttac.org

17 A Transition-Rich IEP Measurable postsecondary goals Assessment/Present levels of achievement

18 Assessment-Based PLAAFP What kinds of assessments (informal and formal)? Are the areas assessed the most important ones for this student, given his/her postschool goals? (individualized!) Are they age-appropriate? Are they valid and reliable for the students you are assessing? Who administers assessments? When? How Often? How are results shared with students and with the IEP team? How are results tracked over time? How are results used to develop goals and courses of study, and to determine service needs?

19 Information Needs for Accountability Students present levels of achievement and functional performance Supports and accommodations needed Students performance regarding state standards and benchmarks

20 Information Needs for Student- Focused Planning Temperament Learning Preferences & Styles Background Information Worker/ Personal Characteristics Vocational & Occupational Skills Interests Aptitudes Functional/Life Skills Supports and Accommodations

21 Additional Guidance for Transition Assessments Dr. Jim Martin, University of Oklahoma, stresses at least 4 important areas to assess: 1.Self-determination skills – Self-awareness, Self-advocacy, Self-efficacy, Decision-making, Independent performance, Self- evaluation, Adjustment 2.Career/vocational interests – reading, nonreading tools 3.Basic (overall) transition skills – all relevant adult life domains 4.Functional vocational assessment (when indicated)– much more depthful evaluation for those needing it

22 Example of Transition Assessment Results in PLAAFP DOMAIN Community Participation STRENGTHS Parent: Volunteers at Rec Center on weekends; supervisor reports great people skills and work attitudes. Student: Enjoy working with kids. Home/Indepen- dent Living Parent: Keeps room fairly clean, does family chores with little argument. Student: Do my chores; dont know how to manage money very well. Jobs and Job Training Student: worked as lifeguard in summer Parent: Supervisor said good attendance, following directions, people skills Counselor: ASVAB results showed high interests in human services, physical performance, and mgmt, with high aptitudes in human services & physical perf.

23 Comprehensive Transition Assessment Tools Transition Planning Inventory-Revised (TPI-R) ProEd, Austin Texas (www.proedinc.com) Scales of Independent Behavior - R Riverside Publishing (http://www.riverpub.com) Informal Assessments for Transition Planning ProEd, Austin Texas (www.proedinc.com) Enderle-Severson Transition Rating Form Casey Life Skills Assessment

24 Free Resources for Transition Assessment – Job Seekers >> Career Prospects System Occupational Profiler U.S. Dept of Labor O*NET - Interest profiler, ability profiler Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) – Age Appropriate Transition Assessment Guide – Age Appropriate Transition Assessment Fact Sheet

25 A Transition-Rich IEP Transition services/ linkages with designated responsibility & timelines Measurable postsecondary goals Assessment/Present levels of achievement Long-term activities (e.g., instruction) and services, including course of study

26 Transition Services and Linkages – Designated Responsibility Is the student likely to need outside agency services (for a successful transition) during the next year? For the current year, any evidence in IEP that representatives of any of the following agencies/services were invited to participate in the IEP development? Postsecondary education, vocational training, or continuing and adult education Integrated employment (including supported employment) Independent living or community participation NOTE: Must obtain consent to invite until IEP team member!

27 Measurable Transition Services and Linkages Must address categories of Instruction, Related Services, Community Experiences, and Employment/Other Adult Postschool Areas What does address mean? What does measurable mean in this section? Only address Daily Living and Functional Vocational Evaluation if appropriate

28 Example Transition Services/ Linkages Page (PED IEP form) Activities/ Strategies: INSTRUCTION Agency/ Responsib. TimelinesDocumented Completion or Other -Teach Jana the Paraphrasing Strategy -Provide needed modifications and accommodations in core academic classes -Research, identify, & visit at least 3 colleges of interest -School/special educator teacher -School/general ed teachers -Jana (w/case mgr or transition specialist monitor) -Sept-Oct Fall 2008

29 Example Transition Services/ Linkages Page (PED IEP form) Activities/ Strategies: EMPLOYMENT Agency/ Responsib. TimelinesDocumented Completion or Other - Research, select, & complete one unpaid and one paid (if possible) internships in law enforcement area of choice - Meet with DVR counselor for eligibility determination & possible college supports -Jana (case mgr monitors) -DVR counselor, Jana, parents (case mgr monitors) - Spring Spring Winter 2010

30 Transition Services Includes the Course of Study Student has already identified her/his postschool goals Course of study lists courses/other experiences for all the remaining years of high school Helps to annually document credits earned and progress toward graduation Must be individualized and linked to the students postschool goal(s) Similar to (supercedes) the Next Step Plan; typically problematic if a student does BOTH the Next Step Plan and the IEP transition plan

31 Example Course of Study (PED IEP form) School Year Credits Earned Courses Selected Skills for Success (reading, future planning, personal mgmt) English I, Algebra I, P.E./Girls Basketball Physical Science, U.S. History English II, Applied Math I, P.E./Girls Basketball, Keyboarding/Computer Literacy, Biology Concepts/Biology, World Geography English III, Geometry, Girls Basketball, Psychology/Sociology Spanish I (1/2 cr.)/Government, Work Study (1/2 cr.) English IV, Algebra II, Culinary Essentials/Sewing, Clothing & Crafts, Public Speaking/Girls Basketball Spanish II (1 cr.), Work-Study (1 cr.)

32 A Transition-Rich IEP Transition services & linkages, with designated responsibilities & timelines Annual IEP transition goals Measurable postsecondary goals Assessment/Present levels of achievement Activities (e.g., instruction) and services each year, including course of study

33 Annual Transition-Related Goals What needs to be achieved this year to help the student move toward his/her postsecondary goal(s)? What does s/he need to learn? Is the goal measurable? Is it outcome- rather than process-oriented?

34 Annual Transition-Related Goals – Examples Susan will master the skills of information processing in COMP 1001 with 95% accuracy, as measured by unit exams and final exam. Susan will demonstrate basic awareness of computing occupations to the counselors satisfaction as measured by an interview. Susan will identify 3 postsecondary educational programs for computing occupations in her careers class 9-week advisory meeting. Susan will articulate her accommodation needs in computing environments through her interview with the rehabilitation services counselor.

35 More Annual Goals Examples Jana will increase her reading comprehension skill levels from 5.9 to 7.5 grade level equivalents by May 2009, in order to complete course and exam requirements for the standard pathway to the diploma and move into postsecondary learning as planned, as measured by her scores on the standards-based assessment. By April 2009, Jana will create and apply a process for analyzing her job shadow experiences, her results from transition assessments, and her visits to colleges to determine the most feasible area for planning an internship the following year, as measured by her comprehensive plan.

36 A Transition-Rich IEP Transition services & Linkages with Designated Responsibilities & timelines Annual IEP transition goals Measurable postsecondary goals Assessment/Present level of achievement Activities (e.g., instruction) and services each year, including course of study

37 Indicator 13 Data Collection Past years: used OLeary and colleagues Transition Requirements Checklist This year and thereafter: will use NSTTAC Indicator 13 Checklist, Form B Trained trainer will either review IEP files alone to answer the checklist questions, or will train group to assist in data collection

38 Indicator 13 Data Use UNM Institute for Public Policy enters and analyzes data, creates district data sheets Data are reported to NMPED Special Education Bureau for distribution in district profiles District can request report-out session with larger audience offering chance for collaborative goal-setting for improvement QUESTIONS?

39 Resources NSTTAC Indicator 13 Checklist OLearys TOPs checklist NSTTACs training materials Web-based examples and non-examples

40 Contact information Ginger Blalock, Ph.D. Education-Transition Consulting LLC REC 6 IEP Transition Planning Project Coordinator Cheryl Hamilton REC 6 IEP Transition Planning Program Manager


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