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PBIS Team Training Module 3: Tertiary Implementation.

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1 PBIS Team Training Module 3: Tertiary Implementation

2 Exceptional Children Division Behavior Support & Special Programs Positive Behavior Intervention & Support Initiative

3 Modules developed by the University of Missouri Center for School-wide PBIS and revised by North Carolina PBIS Trainers

4 Expectations Be Responsible Return promptly from breaks Be an active participant Be Respectful Turn off cell phone ringers Listen attentively to others Be Kind Participate in activities Listen and respond appropriately to others ideas 4

5 Attention Signal Trainer will raise his/her hand Participants will raise their hand and wait quietly 5

6 Welcome to PBIS Module 3 Training! Prepare a poster showing successes and challenges from Universal and Secondary Implementation. Use data from your most recent Implementation Inventory, SET, etc. 6

7 Training Objectives Participants will be able to: Evaluate implementation of school-wide and secondary PBIS Create a system for receiving and processing individual student referrals Use data to: Identify individual students needing intervention Develop and evaluate interventions to address problem behavior Determine effectiveness of tertiary systems 7

8 Module 3 Accomplishments and Products At the end of these two days, teams are expected to have: Conceptualized tertiary systems for your setting Discussed implementation of teacher-led practices Reviewed data collection & assessment for individual students Developed action steps for tertiary implementation 8

9 Activity: PBIS Review Crossword 9 Workbook Page 3

10 Activity Review Universal and Secondary Implementation based on Implementation Inventory Scores. Use the data to identify Action Steps 10 Workbook Pages 4-7

11 PBIS Tertiary Support is: A systems approach to individualized intervention and support development. A process that all staff in your school will use to support individual students. A teacher-led process that utilizes a functional approach to addressing behavior 11

12 Whole School Effective School Organization Positive School Climate Effective Staff Development Data Based Decision Making Culturally Responsive Practices Parent and Community Partnerships Effective Instructional Practices Classroom Effective Instructional Practices Positive Classroom Management Culturally Responsive Instruction Universal Design/ Differentiated Instruction Ongoing Screening and Assessment Classroom Coaching and Consultation Struggling Students Progress Monitoring Behavioral Group Strategies Mental Health Assistance Focused Research-based Academic Instruction Individuals FBA/BIP Mental Health Services Consider- action for Eligibility EC Specially Designed Instruction Behavior Interventions Related Services School Improvement Targeted Group Interventions Small group instruction Focused academic help sessions Intensive, Individual Interventions Tutoring Academic Remediation Plans Specially Designed Instruction Intensive, Individual Interventions Functional Behavior Assessment & Behavior Intervention Planning Targeted Group Interventions Social Skills instruction Reinforcement of specific skills Group Behavioral Strategies Classroom Coaching Universal Interventions School-wide rules and procedures Systematic reinforcement Social Skills Instruction Culturally responsive practices Data-based decision- making Parent & Community Partnerships Universal Interventions Effective instructional practices Recognition of academic achievement Culturally responsive practices Data-based decision- making Parent & Community Partnerships AcademicBehavior 12 Resources Page 5

13 Primary Prevention Schoolwide and Classroomwide Systems for All Students, Staff, & Settings ~ 80% of Students Secondary Prevention Specialized Group Systems for Students with AtRisk Behavior ~15% Tertiary Prevention: Specialized Individualized Systems for Students with HighRisk Behavior ~5% CONTINUUM OF POSITIVE BEHAVIOR SUPPORT 13 Resources Page 6

14 Core 14 GOAL: 100% of students achieve at high levels Tier I: Begins with clear goals: 1.What do we expect all students to know, understand and do as a result of our instruction? 2.How will we know if these goals are met? 3.How will we respond when students do not meet the goals with initial instruction? 4.How will we respond when some students have already met the goals? (Batsche, 2010)

15 Supplemental 15 Tier II < 20% of students Core + Supplemental To Achieve Benchmarks 1.Where are the students performing now? 2.Where do we want them to be? 3.How long do we have to get them there? 4.How much do they have to grow per year/month to get there? 5.What resources will move them at that rate? 6.How will we monitor the growth of students receiving supplemental instruction? (Batsche, 2010)

16 ve, Individualized 16 Tier III < 5% of Students Core + Supplemental + Intensive Individual Instruction …to achieve benchmarks 1.Where is the student performing now? 2.Where do we want him/her to be? 3.How long do we have to get him/her there? 4.What supports has he/she received? 5.What resources will move him/her at that rate? 6.How will we monitor and evaluate the students growth? (Batsche, 2010)

17 Dec 7, 2007 Science Soc Studies Reading Math Soc skills Basketball Spanish Label behavior…not people

18 SYSTEMS Supporting Staff Behavior DATA SupportingDecisionMaking PRACTICES Supporting Student Behavior Positive Behavior Intervention & Support OUTCOMES Social Competence & Academic Achievement 18 Resources Page 6

19 Collect and Use and UseData Develop Hypothesis Discuss and Select Solutions Develop and Implement Action Plan Evaluate and Revise Action Plan Problem Solving Meeting Foundations Team Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) Model Identify Problems (Newton, et. al., 2009) Resources Pages 7-9

20 Tertiary Implementation: Data, Systems, and Practices to Support Individuals

21 SYSTEMS Supporting Staff Behavior DATA SupportingDecisionMaking PRACTICES Supporting Student Behavior PositiveBehaviorIntervention & Support OUTCOMES Social Competence & Academic Achievement 21

22 Data Collection Strategies & Tools Problem identification, data collection, and evaluation 22

23 Clear Definition of Problem Behavior The Stranger Test Is the description of the behavior crystal clear? Would a strangers description match yours? If a stranger read your description, would they be able to identify the problem behavior? 23

24 fighting talking out completing work inattentive swearing out of area defiant rude Not Measurable bothering oppositional lazy Measurable Measurable Descriptors 24

25 Objective Subjective Every ten minutes Continuously Talking during seatwork Disobedient Sometimes Once or twice a week Tapping pencil on desk Five times each day Hurrying through work Repeatedly Seldom Bizarre Bothering a neighbor Leaning back in chair Twice each period Passing notes Data Considerations: Objective Descriptors 25

26 Context Frequency Intensity Duration How often does the behavior occur? How extreme is it? How long does it last? Under what circumstances does it occur? Data Considerations: Data to Collect 26

27 Data Collection Strategies What is already collected? Anecdotal notes by teacher Office referrals Disciplinary actions 27

28 Data Collection Strategies What else can be collected? Products from Consequences Behavior Contracts Checklists Daily Behavior Report (DBR) Direct Observation Interviews 28

29 Think sheets 29 Fixing Broken Rules The rule I broke was What should happen because I broke the rule? Becoming A Problem Solver How should I have solved the problem? List 2 better ways. What will I do from now on? Resources Pages 10-11

30 DBRs Daily Behavior Report = DBR Also referred to as Direct Behavior Rating The DBR involves a brief rating of target behavior over a specified period of time on a scale For more information and examples: /index.php/communication/2- uncategorised/13#groupS /index.php/communication/2- uncategorised/13#groupS 30 Level II Resources Page 12

31 31 Characteristics of DBR The DBR involves a brief rating of target behavior over a specified period of time behavior(s) is specified rating of the behavior(s) typically occurs at least daily obtained information is shared across individuals (e.g., parents, teachers, students) the card is used to monitor the effects of an intervention as a component of an intervention (Chafouleas, Riley-Tillman & McDougal, 2002)

32 32 Potential Uses for the DBR Increase communication As a component of an intervention package, particularly in self- management Provide quick assessment of behaviors, especially those not easily captured by other means Monitor student behavior over time Flexible

33 33 A systematic DBR possesses the following 4 characteristics: 1. The behavior of interest must be operationally defined 2. The observations should be conducted under standardized procedures 3. The DBR should be used in a specific time, place, and at a predetermined frequency 4. The data must be scored and summarized in a consistent manner

34 How are DBR data summarized? 34

35 35

36 DBR Considerations Measures perception of behavior 3 to 7 not he is a 7 No absolutes in Social Behavior Rater Effects 36

37 Individual Student Data Tracking Resources Page 13

38 Direct Assessment – Frequency Counts Behavior Counting Name ____Shamel ____ Week of __Nov 5, 200X______ Behavior to be counted ____Negative Comments to Peers: (Get out of my face. ) Mon.Tue.Wed.Thurs.Fri.Total Arrival Math Science Art Reading IIIIIIIII IIIIIIIII IIIII IIIII I I40 III3 IIIIIIIIIII11 IIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIII IIIII24 IIIIII6 Resources Page 14

39 Direct Assessment – Duration Recording Record the elapsed time, usually in minutes, from onset to conclusion of target behavior. Be sure to indicate the date, and the activity in which the student was engaged when the target behavior began to escalate. Student Name: ___Shamel __ Week of / Day : __Nov 15, 200X____ Target Behavior: Tantrum (screams, lays on floor, throws items) Behavior Incident Briefly describe, making sure to note date, time, and any circumstances you think noteworthy. TransitionLarge GroupSmall GroupIndividualWorkRead AloudRead SilentlyIn CrowdsLibrarySpecialsSpecificSubject #1 #2 #3 9:45-10:15, Mon, Nov 15 Group was doing read aloud 9:35-10:15, Tue, Nov 16 Went to an assembly in the gym #3 9:28-10:05, Fri, Nov 19 Oral vocabulary test Resources Page 14

40 Context Checklist Social/Emotional Response to demand/request Transition between tasks/ setting Interruption in routine Change in home/family dynamics Lack of social attention Negative social interaction w/peers Negative social interaction w/adults Social skills deficits Consequences imposed for negative behavior Other (specify): ____________________________ Academic/Instructional Specific subject: ____________________________ Grade level : on/above/below Activities: too easy/ too difficult Work completion: finishes quickly/ average / rarely finishes Resources Page 15

41 Classroom Assessment 41 Classroom Management Checklist *adapted from Geoff Colvin's Classroom Strategies Name of Teacher ___________________ Date ______________ Designing the Physical Space In Place = 2 Partially = 1 Not = 0 1. A specific classroom area is identified for independent work. 2. A specific classroom area is identified for group work. 3. A specific classroom area is identified for free choice activity. 4. A specific classroom area is identified for time out. 5. A specific classroom area is identified which is easily accessible for teacher storage and student supplies. Level I Resources Pages 16-19

42 42 Data Considerations What is the target behavior and goal? Focus on a specific behavior that has been operationally defined Goal to increase or decrease behavior Who is the focus of the rating? Individual, small-group or class-wide What is the period for rating? Specific school period, daily, or other What is the setting of observation? Classroom or other location

43 43 Data Considerations How often will data be collected? Multiple times a day, daily, weekly Which tools are the best to assess the behavior? Checklist, rating scale, DBR, observation, interview Who will conduct the rating? What resources can be used to collect data? Classroom teacher, aide, or other educational professional Will ratings be tied to consequences? Consequences must be consistently delivered by person responsible

44 Activity: Tertiary Data With your team complete the Tertiary Data activity 44 Workbook Page 8

45 SYSTEMS Supporting Staff Behavior DATA SupportingDecisionMaking PRACTICES Supporting Student Behavior PositiveBehavior Intervention and Support OUTCOMES Social Competence & Academic Achievement 45

46 Activity

47 Critical Elements of Tertiary Systems

48 Tertiary Systems Considerations Commit to: Establishing a team to assess and intervene with students who have serious behavior problems Allotting adequate time and resources for the team Training & planning Design & implementation of individual supports 48

49 Why do we need Tertiary Systems? To make a lasting, positive, change in behavior To provide a systematic way to support staff and students To establish practices for children with behavior concerns 49

50 Team Structure Consideration Who? What? When? Where? Why? 50

51 Most Common Team Structures Problem-Solving Only TeamRtI & PBIS Teams Pre-referral and PBIS absorbed in RtI Pre-referral absorbed in RtI

52 Tier III Academic Tier II Academic Tier I Academic Tier I Behavior Tier II Behavior Tier III Behavior Problem Solving Only Team Will you have representatives for each level of support or for grade levels?

53 PBIS Team School-wide PBIS process 5 th grade Behavior 4 th grade Behavior 3 rd grade Behavior How will you structure both problem solving teams? 2 nd grade Behavior 1 st grade Behavior Kinder- garten behavior Kinder- garten Academic 1 st grade Academic 2 nd grade Academic 3 rd grade Academic 4 th grade Academic 5 th grade Academic RtI Team RtI process

54 Team Responsibilities: Tertiary System Considerations Identify resources and structures develop the tertiary system of supports Assess students Develop and implement support plans Personnel Family Involvement External agency involvement (Child and Family Teams/System of Care) 54

55 Team Responsibilities: Implement the Tertiary System Access training and on-going staff development to establish and maintain knowledge of PBIS team Providing staff development and support to teachers regarding the process Support teachers with assessment and implementation 55

56 Team Responsibilities: Monitor the Tertiary System Review behavioral data and interventions in order to evaluate the effectiveness Reviewing Implementation Inventory Tertiary Systems, Data, and Practices to address areas of need 56

57 Activity: Tertiary Team Discuss connections to existing teams (ex. RtI, pre-referral, PBIS, SOC, etc.) Discuss team structure, organization, and communication. Complete the Tertiary Team Functions Section of your workbook. 57 Workbook Page 9

58 Create the System: Working Smarter What does working smarter look like at the individual level? How do we invest our resources wisely? 58 Develop a continuum of support within the tertiary level to address all the shades of red

59 Three Important Themes Create systems (not just interventions) to support all students Intervene earlier rather than later Evidence, not opinion 59

60 Data Decision Rules To address: Teachers initiating the behavioral support process Student data initiating the process Progress and goal completion rules Tertiary intervention effectiveness guidelines 60

61 Examples Less than 15 Star Tickets earned per week for 2 weeks More than 5 absences in a 30 day period 3 or more counseling referrals in a 30 day period 6 or more office discipline referrals Progress to 80% completion of homework assignments 70% of students receiving this tertiary intervention meet their goals within 8 weeks 61

62 Activity: Tertiary Data Decision Rules Discuss with your team possible data decision rules for your school Student referrals Progress and goal completion Intervention effectiveness 62 Workbook Page 10

63 Systems for Individual Students Quick, supportive response to teacher Understand how behavior is functionally related to the teaching environment (competing pathways) If you have multiple students displaying similar behaviors = system issue not individual student issue 63

64 Referral Process How will teachers know who to refer? Data decision rule Professional judgment After what process in classroom How do they refer? Form To Whom 64

65 Referral Process What happens next? Data collection Case manager Parent/family participation Team meeting 65

66 Referral Process Plan Plan written? Good fit for context? Executed by whom? How do you know? Evaluated? Next Steps 66

67 Individual Student Referral Process 67 Supplemental Resources Page 20

68 Activity: Tertiary Referral Process Discuss the referral process for tertiary supports section in your workbook 68 Workbook Page 11

69 Part I: Foundations 2-Fully in place 1- partially in place 0-not yet started 1.Score within the past 18 months on the SET (80%/80%), BOQ (70%), or TIC (80%) indicates that SWPBS is being implemented with fidelity A person within the school building is identified to coordinate function-based support planning and implementation At least three people within the school are trained to conduct basic functional behavior assessment interviews and do simple, confirmatory direct observations based on the results of the functional behavior assessment interview At least one person within the school, or regularly available to the school, is trained to conduct direct observation methods of functional behavior assessment and lead development of a behavior support plan An evaluation of Systems for the Tertiary Level: Checklist for Individual Student Systems (CISS) 69 Resources Pages 21-24

70 SYSTEMS Supporting Staff Behavior DATA SupportingDecisionMaking PRACTICES Supporting Student Behavior PositiveBehaviorIntervention & Support OUTCOMES Social Competence & Academic Achievement 70

71 Functional Assessment & Intervention Level of Functional Support ToolsPerson(s) involved Teacher Led Behavior Contract Teacher Student Parent Additional resource Problem Solving Worksheet Competing Behavior Pathway ERASE Team Directed ERASE Team Teacher Student Parent Brief Intervention Planning Full FBA & BIP with Child/Family Team Team Teacher Student Parent Community Partners Functional Analysis & Behavior Intervention Plan 71 INFORMAL EASIER SIMPLE RESPONSIVE NOT RESPONSIVE COMPLICATED HARDER FORMAL Resources Page 25

72 72

73 73 Both Identify: Problem behavior Setting events that increase the likelihood of the occurrence of the targeted behavior Antecedents that reliably predict the target behavior Consequences that maintain the behavior Plans to teach replacement behavior

74 Behavior What is the challenging behavior? What can you observe? What does it look or sound like? Choose one Prioritize 74

75 Behavior 75

76 Setting Events What environmental, personal, situational or daily events impact the behavior? Eating/Sleeping routines Medical/Physical problems Familial and staff interactions Do not immediately precede problem behavior 76

77 Setting Events 77

78 Antecedent What happens immediately before the behavior? Predicts problem behavior When, Where, With whom, Activity Time of day Physical Setting People present Types of interactions (demands, directives, etc.) 78

79 Antecedent 79

80 Consequence What happens immediately after the behavior? Gives student a reason to repeat the problem behavior Not related to punishment 80

81

82 82 Function … People behave for a reason - we call this function Function: Does he/she get something? Tangibles, attention, stimulation, people, etc. Does he/she avoid or escape something? People, activities, embarrassment, tasks, etc.

83 Only Two Basic Functions Sugai, 2011

84 Hypothesis Statements Information about the problem behavior is used to write a hypothesis statement that helps us predict when the problem behavior is likely to occur and the function of that behavior 84

85 When Estes is ___________ and __________ (happens), he where/setting context/antecedent typically responds by _________ to gain/avoid ____________. behavior function to access peer and teacher attention. Hypothesis: When Estes is in language artsand the teacher is providing direct he typically responds by making verbal noises (ex. Burping) Hypothesis Statements 85 instruction

86 86 Activity Write a hypothesis statement about Brunos behavior Bruno

87 Identifying the function helps: Choose an appropriate intervention Will this intervention meet the functional need? Choose an appropriate replacement behavior Alternative behavior taught to the student What you want the student to do instead Must meet functional need 87

88

89 Teacher-Led Behavior Support 89

90 Teacher – Led Support Any individualized behavior support should always begin with a hypothesis based on data about the student 90

91 Teacher – Led Support Level of Functional Support ToolsPerson(s) involved 91

92 Behavior Contract Individualized class or school behavior plan Adjust goals Prerequisite skills Shorter time periods More frequent reinforcement Contract to address performance deficit 92

93 Behavioral Contracts Positive reinforcement intervention Clarify behavioral expectations for students and staff to carry out the intervention plan Include the student in designing the contract to increase motivation Include parents in planning and reinforcement 93

94 Steps for Designing Behavior Contracts List student behaviors Can be reduced or increased Behavioral goals should usually be stated in positive, goal-oriented terms Clearly defined, observable 94 (Wright, 2011; Jenson, Rhode, Reavis, 1994)

95 Steps for Designing Behavior Contracts Contract Reinforcers A statement or section that explains the minimum conditions under which the student will earn a point, sticker, or other token for showing appropriate behaviors Amount of behavior Amount of reinforcement 95 (Wright, 2011; Jenson, Rhode, Reavis, 1994)

96 Steps for Designing Behavior Contracts (continued) Collection Describe when the student will be able to redeem points earned for reward/recognition 96 (Wright, 2011; Jenson, Rhode, Reavis, 1994)

97 Steps for Designing Behavior Contracts (continued) Bonus clauses (optional) can provide extra incentives for the student to follow the contract offers the student some type of additional 'pay-off' for consistently reaching behavioral targets 97 (Wright, 2011; Jenson, Rhode, Reavis, 1994)

98 Steps for Designing Behavior Contracts (continued) Negotiate and Document Terms Discuss the plan and responsibilities of the student and staff Areas for signature. both teacher and student signatures Other staff, parents, administrators 98 (Wright, 2011; Jenson, Rhode, Reavis, 1994)

99 Sample Contracts 99 My Contract: Race to 20! These are my goals: These are my consequences if I dont meet my goals: These are my rewards if I meet my goals: Resources Pages 26-29

100 Collect and Use and UseData Develop Hypothesis Discuss and Select Solutions Develop and Implement Action Plan Evaluate and Revise Action Plan Problem Solving Meeting Foundations Team Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) Model Identify Problems 100 How are Tertiary Practices related to the Problem Solving Process? Lets examine that together.

101 Teacher Led Support- How they connect to the problem solving process 101 Problem Solving Process TIPs Problem Solving Worksheet Competing Behavior Pathways ERASE Identify the problemPrimary Problem Statement Problem BehaviorExplain the problem Develop hypothesisPrecision Problem Statement Evaluate Setting events, antecedents, behavior and consequences Reason for engaging in the behavior Discuss and select solutions Solution OptionsDesired alternative and strategies to address each pathway component Appropriate behavior- what he/she should do instead Develop and implement action plan Action PlanningWho/When listed in Strategies Support- plan for helping student engage in appropriate behavior Evaluate and revise action plan Evaluation PlanningPlan review.Evaluate- to determine if plan is effective

102 TIPS Problem Solving Worksheet Use during Activities Date: ___________ School: ________________ 1. Primary Problem Statement Problem Statement elements Who ___________________________________________________ What __________________________________________________ Where _________________________________________________ When _________________________________________________ Why ___________________________________________________ 2. Precision Problem Statement 102 Resources Page 30

103 Prevent reduce probability of future or continued problem behavior Teach increase probability of positive behavior change Acknowledge Provide positive feedback when expected behavior occurs Correct Specific feedback to increase probability of improved behavior after error Extinction reduce reward for problem behavior Safety remove occurrence or possibility of injury or harm) Solutions

104 4. Action Planning For solutions to be implemented, who will do what by when? 5. Evaluation Planning Goal Setting (what will it look like when you can say there is no longer a problem?) Data Collection (gather additional information) To measure outcomes To measure fidelity of implementation 104

105 Teacher-Led Functional Support: Competing Pathways 105

106 Competing Pathways: Chart Behavior & Hypothesize 106 Setting Events Antecedents Problem Behavior Maintaining Consequences

107 Competing Pathways: Identify Replacement Behavior(s) 107 Desired Alternative Acceptable Alternative Maintaining Consequences Setting Events Antecedents Problem Behavior Maintaining Consequences Acceptable Alternative Acceptable Alternative Acceptable Alternative

108 Setting Event Strategies Antecedent Strategies Behavior Teaching Strategies Consequence Strategies Desired Alternative Acceptable Alternative Maintaining Consequences Setting Events Triggering Antecedents Problem Behavior Maintaining Consequences Competing Pathways: Identify Interventions 108 Resources Page 32

109 Case Study: Eddie 109

110 Case Study: Eddie Do we have a problem? What data do you have? What might you still need to collect? 110

111 Designing Functional Interventions 111 Setting Events Triggering Antecedents Problem Behavior Maintaining Consequences Verbal disagreements with peers before class Asked to turn in homework Verbal Disagreement With teacher Avoids hand- ing in home- work

112 Hypothesis What is your hypothesis about the problem behavior? 112 When Eddie is ___________ and __________ (happens), he where/setting context/antecedent typically responds by _________ to gain/avoid ____________. behavior function

113 Replacement Behavior What do you want the student to do instead of the problem behavior? Will the behavior require shaping with a series of successive approximations of the desired behavior? 113

114 Setting Events Triggering Antecedents Problem Behavior Maintaining Consequences Desired Behavior Maintaining Consequences Adjusted work Completion goals Acceptable Alternative Request help/ Write down assignments Verbal Disagree ment with peers before class Asked to turn in homework Verbal Disagreement with teacher Avoids handing in homework Eddie will complete assigned homework 114

115 Utilizing the Competing Behavior Pathways Strategies Sheet How can you impact each area involved with the challenging behavior? Consider: Instruction Interventions Environmental modification 115

116 Event Strategies Antecedent Strategies Behavior Teaching Strategies Consequences Strategies Intervention & Support Strategies: Eddies Plan 116 Teach Eddie how to request help and write down assignments. Re-teach and reinforce the homework submission routine. Complete missing assignments in study hall. Earn free homework passes for every 8 assignments turned in on time. Teacher and students will utilize Peer Mediation Strategies.

117 Implement the Strategies Who is responsible? Resources? When to review? Goal? Collect data during implementation 117

118 Event Strategies Antecedent Strategies Behavior Teaching Strategies Consequences Strategies Eddies Plan Example 118 Teach Eddie how to request help and write down assignments. Re-teach and reinforce the homework submission routine. Complete missing assignments in study hall. Earn free homework passes for every 8 assignments turned in on time. Teacher and students will utilize Peer Mediation Strategies. Plan review date: 11/19/2011 We agree to the conditions of this plan. Eddie Smith_________________ StudentParent _____________ TeacherTeam member

119 Evaluate Was the plan implemented consistently and with fidelity? Did it work? What changes need to be made? 119

120 Event Strategies Antecedent Strategies Behavior Teaching Strategies Consequences Strategies Eddies Plan Review 120 Teach Eddie how to request help and write down assignments. Update 11/19/11- Taught 9/30/11. Increased from 1 completed assignment/wk to 8 completed assignments/ wk. Re-teach and reinforce the homework submission routine. Update 11/19/11- re- taught on 9/30/11; reinforced with Free homework passes, 6 earned to date. Complete missing assignments in study hall. Earn free homework passes for every 8 assignments turned in on time. Update 11/19/11- Increased number of assignments completed by 60%. Eddie is earning free homework passes. Teacher and students will utilize Peer Mediation Strategies. Update 11/19/11- 3 peers attended PM trng. 1 peer was observed using strategies with Eddie.

121 Case Study Practice: Shane 121 Watch this video clip of Shanes behavior in math class and identify problems. Practice with your team. Workbook Page 12

122 Teacher led Functional Assessment of Behavior: ERASE 122 Resources Page 33-37

123 E xplain R eason A ppropriate S upport E valuate What would you like him/her to do instead? How can you help this happen more often? How will you know if it works? What is he/she getting out of it or getting away from? What is the problem? ERASE problem behavior Supplemental Resources Page 34 (Scott, n.d.)

124 ERASE: Explain What is the problem? Create an operational definition of behavior Describe why the behavior is a problem Determine if student can engage in appropriate behavior. List what has already been tried. 124 PBIS Newsletter, Volume 2, Issue 3

125 ERASE: Reason What is student getting or avoiding? Determine what times, locations, contexts, conditions, etc. tend to predict or precede: problem behavior appropriate behavior 125 PBIS Newsletter, Volume 2, Issue 3

126 ERASE: Reason Determine what types of events tend to follow behavior? peers, instruction, consequences, etc. after problem behavior after appropriate behavior 126

127 ERASE: Reason Make a guess at the function – why do you think he/she is doing this? access to... (persons, objects, attention, etc.) escape or avoid... (persons, activities, attention, etc.) 127

128 ERASE: Appropriate What would you like student to do instead? Determine what times, locations, contexts, conditions, etc. tend to predict or precede: fair pair – incompatible with problem (cant do at same time) functional – meets the same function as problem behavior 128 PBIS Newsletter, Volume 2, Issue 3

129 ERASE: Support How can you help this happen more often? Determine how the replacement behavior and intervention plan will be taught Rules (what it is and -- when, where, how, and why to use behavior) Examples (modeling and use of naturally occurring examples) Practice (opportunities to practice with teacher feedback) 129 PBIS Newsletter, Volume 2, Issue 3

130 ERASE: Support Consider realistic routines and physical arrangements that could be implemented to facilitate student success (avoid predictable failure and create success opportunities) prompts and reminders supervise avoid triggers 130

131 ERASE: Support Determine appropriate consequences for replacement and problem behaviors – and consider what is realistic for you to do reinforcement (matches function) correction (how might this happen?) negative consequences (matches function) natural (try to keep it as realistic as possible) 131

132 ERASE: Evaluate How will you know if it works? Consider realistic strategies for measuring behavior keep it simple consider times and conditions where measurement would be particularly meaningful and realistic 132 PBIS Newsletter, Volume 2, Issue 3

133 Consider what your measure will look like when the behavior is no longer a problem measurable behavior by what time should this happen? 133 ERASE: Evaluate

134 Activity: ERASE Process Review the data for Elvin Write the corresponding letter from the ERASE process that best describes where the information would be entered on the ERASE form 134 Workbook Pages 13-14

135 135 Activity: Paper Kids Do you have students like this? How do you help?

136 General Recommendations For Tertiary Practices Keep doing what is already working Always look for the smallest change that will produce the largest effect Avoid defining a large number of goals Do a small number of things well 136

137 General Recommendations For Tertiary Practices Do not add something new without also defining what you will stop doing to make the addition possible When it comes to problem behavior nothing is 100% 137

138 Activity: Tertiary Practices Evaluate and plan for Tertiary Practices 138 Workbook Page 15

139 Additional training available for the team in your school that will be providing support and practicing the FBA/BIP processes 139

140 Collect and Use and UseData Develop Hypothesis Discuss and Select Solutions Develop and Implement Action Plan Evaluate and Revise Action Plan. Problem Solving Meeting Foundations Team Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) Model Identify Problems Newton, J.S., Todd, A.W., Algozzine, K, Horner, R.H. & Algozzine, B. (2009). The Team Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) Training Manual. Educational and Community Supports, University of Oregon unpublished training manual. Lets Practice!

141 Using the Referrals by Student report as a Universal Screening Tool- Who? Newton, J.S., Todd, A.W., Algozzine, K, Horner, R.H. & Algozzine, B. (2009). The Team Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) Training Manual. Educational and Community Supports, University of Oregon unpublished training manual. Use the data to identify individual students in need of tertiary supports. BH Lets review data for Brandon.

142 When?

143

144 What?

145 Where?

146 Why? 146

147 Do we have a problem?

148 Collect and Use and UseData Develop Hypothesis Discuss and Select Solutions Develop and Implement Action Plan Evaluate and Revise Action Plan. Problem Solving Meeting Foundations Team Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) Model Identify Problems (Newton, et al, 2009)

149 Problem Statements Write a problem statement that specifies the precise nature of the problem The more Ws (what, when, where, who, why) you incorporate into the problem statement, the more precise the problem statement will be The more precise the problem statement, the easier it will be to generate a solution that fits the problem 149 (Newton, et al, 2009)

150 Implementation and Evaluation Precise Problem Statement, based on review of data (What, When, Where, Who, Why) Solution Actions (e.g., Prevent, Teach, Prompt, Reward, Correction, Extinction, Safety) Who?By When? Goal with Timeline, Fidelity & Outcome Measures, & Updates SS JA All teachers 11/1/10 11/3/10 JM will earn 80% of his daily points on his daily progress report per day for 4/5 days per week by 12/18/10 Problem-Solving Action Plan BH has received 7 ODRs during the first grading period for disrespectful behaviors including inappropriate language and harassment in the classroom during reading possibly motivated by peer attention. Re-teach Responsibility lessons Implement CICO Reinforce on-task behaviors with DPR Write your Precise Problem Statement here. (Newton, et al, 2009)

151 Collect and Use and UseData Develop Hypothesis Discuss and Select Solutions Develop and Implement Action Plan Evaluate and Revise Action Plan. Problem Solving Meeting Foundations Team Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) Model Identify Problems Quick Review (Newton, et al, 2009)

152 Solutions – Generic Strategies Prevent – Remove or alter trigger for problem behavior Define & Teach – Define behavioral expectations; provide demonstration/instruction in expected behavior (alternative to problem behavior Reward/reinforce – The expected/alternative behavior when it occurs; prompt for it, as necessary Withhold reward/reinforcement – For the problem behavior, if possible (Extinction) Use non-rewarding/non-reinforcing corrective consequences – When problem behavior occurs Although not a solution strategy, Safety may need to be considered (i.e., procedures that may be required to decrease likelihood of injuries or property damage) (Newton, et al, 2009) 152

153 Prevent Trigger Define & TeachReteach Respect lessons emphasizing alternatives to cursing. Teach 5 alternative phrases to express frustration. Reward/ReinforceEstablish behavior contract and reward earning 80% of points per day. Withhold RewardTeach peers to withhold attention. Corrective consequence Ask for alternative way of expressing his thoughts/feelings. Suggest alternatives when necessary. Other Safety Problem statement: BH has received 7 ODRs during the first grading period for disrespectful behaviors including inappropriate language and harassment in the classroom during reading possibly motivated by peer attention. (Newton, et al, 2009)

154 Implementation and Evaluation Precise Problem Statement, based on review of data (What, When, Where, Who, Why) Solution Actions (e.g., Prevent, Teach, Prompt, Reward, Correction, Extinction, Safety) Who?By When? Goal with Timeline, Fidelity & Outcome Measures, & Updates SS JA All teachers 11/1/10 11/3/10 JM will earn 80% of his daily points on his daily progress report per day for 4/5 days per week by 12/18/10 Problem-Solving Action Plan JM has received 2 ODRs during the first grading period for disruptive behaviors in the classroom during reading possibly motivated by attention. Re-teach Respect lessons. Teach 5 alternative expressions. Behavior Contract and Reinforce 80% use of appropriate language. Write Solutions here. (Newton, et al, 2009)

155 Collect and Use and UseData Develop Hypothesis Discuss and Select Solutions Develop and Implement Action Plan Evaluate and Revise Action Plan. Problem Solving Meeting Foundations Team Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) Model Identify Problems Quick Review (Newton, et al, 2009)

156 Implementation and Evaluation Precise Problem Statement, based on review of data (What, When, Where, Who, Why) Solution Actions (e.g., Prevent, Teach, Prompt, Reward, Correction, Extinction, Safety) Who?By When? Goal with Timeline, Fidelity & Outcome Measures, & Updates SS JA All teachers 11/1/10 11/3/10 BH will earn 80% of his daily points on his behavior contract per day for 4/5 days per week by 12/18/10 Problem-Solving Action Plan JM has received 2 ODRs during the first grading period for disruptive behaviors in the classroom during reading possibly motivated by attention. Re-teach Responsibility lessons Implement CICO Reinforce on-task behaviors with DPR Document Implementation here. Document Goal here. (Newton, et al, 2009)

157 Collect and Use and UseData Develop Hypothesis Discuss and Select Solutions Develop and Implement Action Plan Evaluate and Revise Action Plan. Problem Solving Meeting Foundations Team Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) Model Identify Problems Quick Review (Newton, et al, 2009)

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159 Implementation and Evaluation Precise Problem Statement, based on review of data (What, When, Where, Who, Why) Solution Actions (e.g., Prevent, Teach, Prompt, Reward, Correction, Extinction, Safety) Who?By When? Goal with Timeline, Fidelity & Outcome Measures, & Updates SS JA All teachers 11/1/10 11/3/10 JM will earn 80% of his daily points on his daily progress report per day for 4/5 days per week by 12/18/10 Problem-Solving Action Plan JM has received 2 ODRs during the first grading period for disruptive behaviors in the classroom during reading possibly motivated by attention. Re-teach Responsibility lessons Implement CICO Reinforce on-task behaviors with DPR Newton,, et. al., /1 BM has shown some initial progress with his behavior contract and he earned 80% of his points for the past 8 days. Update: continue with the plan. Consider next- Add a self- monitoring component and check back in 2 weeks. Evaluate here.

160 Problem Solving Practice Use your disciplinary data and the results of the team activities to practice the problem solving process If you do not have your own data, practice data is provided in the Resources pages Use the TIPS problem solving worksheet to assist you with the process 160 Resources Page Workbook Page 16

161 Planning for Implementation 161

162 Tertiary Action Planning Review your individual student discipline data Apply the problem solving steps Develop your Module 3 Action Plan What is the plan for individual students with intensive needs? What is the plan for data & support systems to address students with intensive needs? 162 Workbook Page 17

163 Action Planning Use your Implementation Inventory Data Consider Universal, Secondary and Tertiary Implementation Review the action steps your team has developed during training, prioritize items, and finalize your action plan (Action Plan document) 163 Workbook Page 18

164 Additional Tools and Support All references are cited in the reference section of your workbook Technical AssistanceYour Regional or LEA Coordinator 164 Resources Pages 42-45

165 Conclusion of Module 3 Questions? Please complete and return your training evaluation form Thank you! 165


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