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General Education Essentials: Civic Engagement, Diversity, and Global Learning General Education & Assessment Conference Friday, February 18 Atlanta, GA.

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Presentation on theme: "General Education Essentials: Civic Engagement, Diversity, and Global Learning General Education & Assessment Conference Friday, February 18 Atlanta, GA."— Presentation transcript:

1 General Education Essentials: Civic Engagement, Diversity, and Global Learning General Education & Assessment Conference Friday, February 18 Atlanta, GA Presenters: Dr. Daniel Hiroyuki Teraguchi, Associate Director and Research Associate, Office of Diversity, Equity, and Global Initiatives, AAC&U Dr. Caryn McTighe Musil, Senior Vice President, AAC&U

2 Flow of Presentation I.Big Liberal Education Picture II.Trends in GenEd III.Intellectual Links between Diversity, Civic, and Global Learning

3 Greater Expectations: 5 Key Educational Outcomes 1.strong analytical, communication, quantitative, and information skills 2.deep understanding of and hands-on experience with the inquiry practices of disciplines that explore the natural, social, and cultural realms 3.intercultural knowledge and collaborative problem- solving skills 4.a proactive sense of responsibility for individual, civic, and social choices 5.habits of mind that foster integrative thinking and the ability to transfer skills and knowledge from one setting to another

4 Greater Expectations: 5 Key Educational Outcomes 1.strong analytical, communication, quantitative, and information skills achieved and demonstrated through learning in a range of fields, settings, and media, and through advanced studies in one or more areas of concentration 2.deep understanding of and hands-on experience with the inquiry practices of disciplines that explore the natural, social, and cultural realms achieved and demonstrated through studies that build conceptual knowledge by engaging learners in concepts and modes of inquiry that are basic to the natural sciences, social sciences, humanities, and arts

5 Greater Expectations: 5 Key Educational Outcomes 3.intercultural knowledge and collaborative problem-solving skills acieved and demonstrated in a variety of collaborative contexts (classroom, community-based, international, and online) that prepare students both for democratic citizenship and for work 4.a proactive sense of responsibility for individual, civic, and social choices achieved and demonstrated through forms of learning that connect knowledge, skills, values, and public action, and through reflection on students own role and responsibilities in social and civic contexts 5.habits of mind that foster integrative thinking and the ability to transfer skills and knowledge from one setting to another achieved and demonstrated through advanced research and/or creative projects in which students take the primary responsibility for framing questions, carrying out an analysis, and producing work of substantial complexity and quality

6 Our Students Best Work Student Learning & Engagement Integrative Thinking Intercultural knowledge & Collaborative Problem-Solving Skills Responsibility Communication Skills Modes of Inquiry – Critical Thinking

7 Student Learning Outcomes Creating the Intentional Learner Empowered, Responsible, and Informed Student Development Architecture/ Structures

8 Student Learning Outcomes Reflection/ Development Co-Curricular Life Community Engagement GenEd Major Culminating Project StructureStudent Development

9 Student Learning Outcomes Reflection/ Development Co-Curricular Life Community Engagement GenEd Major StructureStudent Development CivicGlobal Div Culminating Project

10 Student Learning Outcomes Reflection/ Development Co-Curricular Life Community Engagement GenEd Major StructureStudent Development CivicGlobal Div Culminating Project

11 Student Learning Outcomes Reflection/ Development Co-Curricular Life Community Engagement GenEd Major StructureStudent Development CivicGlobal Div Culminating Project

12 Student Learning Outcomes Reflection/ Development Co-Curricular Life Community Engagement GenEd Major StructureStudent Development CivicGlobal Div Culminating Project

13 Student Learning Outcomes Reflection/ Development Co-Curricular Life Community Engagement GenEd Major StructureStudent Development CivicGlobal Div Culminating Project

14 Student Learning Outcomes Reflection/ Development Co-Curricular Life Community Engagement GenEd Major StructureStudent Development CivicGlobal Div Culminating Project

15 Structure of Gen Ed Programs Intro Courses Serve as the foundation for student learning in general education programs Sequential Courses A program of study that enable students to integrate and synthesize material from courses in both the major and general education courses and from co-curricular experiences. Capstone Courses Bringing theory to practice and assessing general educations effectiveness

16 Structure of Gen Ed Programs Innovations Intro Courses First Year Experiences Learning Communities Sequential Courses Undergraduate Research Study Abroad Capstone Courses Portfolios Internships

17 What Happens When Diversity, Civic, and Global are Not Part of this Experience Intro Courses First Year Experiences Learning Communities Sequential Courses Undergraduate Research Field-Based Learning Capstone Courses Portfolios Internships

18 Diversity, Civic, and Global Learning Individual Benefits Enhanced critical & complex thinking (Gurin Report, 1999) Preparation to live and work in a diverse society and complex diversity (Gurin Report, 1999; Bowen & Bok, 1998) Greater academic success and decreases in prejudicial attitudes (DiversityWorks, Smith,1997) Advancement of leadership skills through deeper understanding of themselves in order to know how they are seen by others, which leads to a modification of their behaviors and attitudes to encourage a spirit of openness and connection with others (Antonio, 2001; Komives et al., 1998) Greater engagement in life long learning of understanding people and cultures in order to develop a more democratic community and equitable society (Milem, 2003)

19 Diversity, Civic, and Global Learning Institutional Benefits Higher Levels of Student Persistence (Kuh, 2003; Milem, 2003; Chang, 1999; Astin, 1993) Greater satisfaction with the college experience (AAC&Us Diversity Works, 1997) Higher Levels of Academic Excellence (AAC&U, 2004; Ancheta, 2003; Milem, 2003) Preparation of students for a diverse society and workforce (Gurin Report, 1999)

20 Diversity, Civic, and Global Learning Curriculum Benefits Several studies confirm that students acquire cognitively complex skills and cultural understanding through content and pedagogy designed to make the most of the diversity in the classroom. (Adams and Zhou-McGovern, 1994 and A. M. Ortiz, 1995) Several studies reveal that womens studies courses encourage more debate among students than other kinds of courses and, in fact, increase friendships between men and women in the classes. (Musil, Courage to Question,1992) Ethnic studies prepare and educate all students for an increasingly diverse society by discussing issues of race and ethnicity throughout their courses to reduce racial tension and change racial attitudes (Hurtado, 1992; Milem, 1994)

21 Diversity, Civic, and Global Learning Societal Benefits Greater civic engagement and social responsibility (AAC&U, 2004; Milem, 2003) Students gain a deeper knowledge of, debate about, and practice of democracy (AAC&U, 2004; Milem, 2003) Higher levels of service in community/civic organizations (Milem, 2003) Greater equity in society (Milem, 2003) Also visit: U Michigans Diverse Democracy Project at www.umich.edu/~divdemo/index.html

22 Diversity and Global Learning Economic & Business Benefits (Milem, 2003) Better problem solving abilities Higher levels of creativity & innovation Cultivation of workforce with greater levels of cross-cultural competence

23 Magic Box Civic Global Diversity

24 Democratic Outcomes Ability to See Multiple Perspectives Conflict Enhances Democracy Importance of Social Action Engagement Background Characteristics Pre-college Socialization Institutional Characteristics and Climate College Interaction with Diverse Peers Curricular/Co-Curricular Context Societal Influences Diverse Democracy Project ( http://www.umich.edu/~divdemo/index.html) Influence of Pre-college and College Variables on Democratic Outcomes

25 Example - St. Edwards University (www.stedwards.edu/admssns/gened.htm) The six required courses, designed to help students develop a balanced understanding and appreciation for their own and other cultures, are as follows: –Freshman Year- The Human Experience –Sophomore Year- American Experience & American Dilemmas –Junior Year- The Identity of the West & Contemporary World Issues –Senior Year- Capstone Course

26 Example - St. Edwards University The American Experience The purpose of this course is to examine gender, race, ethnic status and social class in experience throughout the country's history. The course places individual and group experience within the social, economic, and political context of various eras, exploring group differences in experience and perspective as well as the ideals and values of American civic culture. American Dilemmas This course presents the principles and methods of economics, sociology and political science to analyze current social problems. The Identity of the West The course deals with major developments in the history of the West which have made Western culture influential in the world. Contemporary World Issues The course consists of two seven-week modules, each dealing with a crucial issue in world affairs in different non-Western areas of the world. The two modules are linked thematically to ensure continuity.

27 Example – San Jose State U. Self, Society, & Equality in the U.S. Student Learning Goals Study the interrelationship of individuals, racial groups, and cultural groups to understand and appreciate issues of diversity, equality, and structured inequality in the U.S., its institutions, and its cultures Outcomes Describe how religions, gender, ethnic, racial, class, sexual orientation, disability, and/or age identity are shaped by cultural and societal influences in contexts of equality and inequality Describe historical, social, political, and economic processes producing diversity, equality, and structured inequalities in the U.S. Describe social actions by religious, gender, ethnic, racial, class, sexual orientation, disability, and/or age groups leading to greater equality and social justice in the U.S. Recognize and appreciate constructive interactions between people from different cultural, racial, and ethnic groups in the U.S.

28 Example – San Jose State U. Culture, Civilization, & Global Understanding Student Learning Goals Give students an appreciation for human expression in different cultures and an understanding of how that expression has developed over time in different cultures. Increase students understanding of how other cultural traditions have influenced American culture and society, as well as how cultures in general develop distinctive features and interact with other cultures Outcomes Compare systematically the ideas, values, images, cultural artifacts, economic structures, technological developments, or attitudes of people from different societies Identify the historical context of ideas and cultural practices and their dynamic relations to other historical contexts Explain how a culture changes in response to internal and external pressures

29 Engagement is Key (Chang, 1996) Engagement with racially and ethnically diverse students and faculty leads to high levels of: Retention Intellectual Self-Confidence Social Self-Confidence Satisfaction with College

30 American Pluralism and the Meaning of Citizenship 1.Experience, Identity, and Aspiration: The study of ones own particular inherited and constructed traditions, identity communities, and significant questions, in their complexity 2.United States Pluralism and the Pursuits of Justice: An extended and comparative exploration of diverse peoples in this society, with significant attention to their differing experiences of United States democracy and the pursuitssometimes successful, sometimes frustratedof equal opportunity 3.Experiences in Justice Seeking: Encounters with systemic constraints on the development of human potential in the United States and experiences in community-based efforts to articulate principles of justice, expand opportunity, and redress inequities. 4.Multiplicity and Relational Pluralism in Majors, Concentrations, and Programs: Extensive participation in forms of learning that foster sustained exploration of and deliberation about contested issues important in particular communities of inquiry and practice

31 American Council on Education Findings on Internationalization on U.S. Campuses Among incoming college students: More than 70 percent believe it is important for colleges and universities to offer international experiences and opportunities Almost 60 percent express a strong preference to study or work abroad for a semester 83 percent believe it is important for colleges and universities to offer opportunities to interact with students from other countries During the 2001-02 Academic year 20% of students at comprehensive universities took just one international course 45% of students took no international courses

32 Example – Wagner College (http://www.wagner.edu/wagnerplan/) The Wagner Plan for the Practical Liberal Arts The Wagner Plan incorporates our longstanding commitment to the liberal arts, experiential learning and interdisciplinary education with our geographical location and enduring bond with New York City. Under The Wagner Plan, students complete a liberal arts core program and a major, totaling 36 units/courses. As part of these requirements, students complete three Learning Communities (LC's)-one in the first year, one during the intermediate years, and one in the senior year in the major.

33 Example – Wagner College The First Year Program First year students enroll in interdisciplinary clusters of courses organized around a common theme called Learning Communities LCs link directly to field experience based upon the theme of the Learning Community. The Intermediate Years During the second and third years of the Wagner Plan, students select an Intermediate Learning Community (ILC) By combining two courses in different fields through the ILC students begin to see in significant ways the connections between disciplines The Senior Program The Senior Learning Community consists of two classes, a substantive course which explores issues within the field of study, and a field-based internship or applied learning component such as a significant original research project. Students enroll in a Reflective Tutorial to discuss their experiences combining fieldwork with course work with other students

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35 Liberal Education, Fall 2002 Pedagogy And Political (Dis)Engagement K. Edward Spiezio 85 percent of undergraduates expressed agreement with the following statement: "I feel like I need more practical information about politics before I get involved." Approximately 85 percent of undergraduates felt that "community volunteering" was better than "political engagement" as a way of solving community problems Existing pedagogies tend to promote service learning rather than political engagement This tends to lead to either political disengagement or very limited forms of political participation among students Community service and service learning experiences grounded in one content area (e.g. ethics) will not necessarily promote the acquisition of knowledge and skills relevant to other content areas (e.g. politics) to use experiential education as a tool to promote political engagement experiences must be explicitly and directly embedded in curricular offerings whose content is dedicated to the art of political participation

36 Liberal Education, Fall 2002 Pedagogy And Political (Dis)Engagement K. Edward Spiezio An effective curricular design should feature a learning environment that would enable students to: learn the basic strategies and tactics of political activism, complemented perhaps with an understanding of the fundamentals of applied policy analysis. interact with practitioners who have chosen public administration, or politically meaningful forms of public service more generally, as a vocation. network with student-based organizations and citizen-based interest groups that are politically active in various issue-areas. experience political processes directly through placements in community- based institutions and organizations that deal with applied policy issues.

37 Outcomes Of College For High School And College Students Top Tier Outcomes Maturity and ability to succeed on ones own Time-management skills Strong work habits Self-discipline Teamwork skills and ability to get along with different types of people Challenge: students dont readily link these outcomes to the college curriculum

38 Outcomes Of College For High School And College Students Middle Tier Outcomes Tangible business skills and specific expertise in field of focus Critical thinking skills Communication skills Problem-solving skills and analytical ability Exposure to business world Leadership skills

39 Outcomes Of College For High School And College Students Bottom Tier Outcomes Values, principles, ethics Tolerance and respect for different cultural backgrounds Competency in computer skills Expanded cultural and global awareness and sensitivity Civic responsibility and orientation toward public service


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