Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

James M. Sloat, Washington & Jefferson College Kathleen E. Harring, Muhlenberg College Robert Rand Davidson, Ursinus College 2011 AAC&U General Education.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "James M. Sloat, Washington & Jefferson College Kathleen E. Harring, Muhlenberg College Robert Rand Davidson, Ursinus College 2011 AAC&U General Education."— Presentation transcript:

1 James M. Sloat, Washington & Jefferson College Kathleen E. Harring, Muhlenberg College Robert Rand Davidson, Ursinus College 2011 AAC&U General Education and Assessment Chicago, Illinois March 4, Assessment 3.0 (Assessment as an Adverb) Shifting the Assessment Paradigm to Facilitate Decentralized Engagement

2 Overview Initial Dilemma Accountability v. Zero-Sum Constraints Defining the Model Assessment as Noun, Verb, Adverb The Model in Practice--Examples Examples from Muhlenberg, Ursinus, W&J The Model in PracticeCase Studies Small Group Discussion Sharing Adverbial Strategies 2

3 Initial Dilemma Increasing demands for accountability through assessment Increasing constraints on time and resources Perceived zero-sum reality Time spent on assessment v. Time spent on real work Potential solution: Decentralization Simply moves the zero-sum challenge Proposed solution: Adverbial Assessment 3

4 4 Assessment as a Noun What is assessment? Evaluation Grades Why do we have to do assessment? Accreditation State/Federal regulations Who will be in charge of assessment? Offices Committees

5 5 Assessment as a Verb When do we do assessment? Accreditation activities Annual internal reports How do we do assessment well? Best Practices Types of evidence: indirect and direct, embedded What have we learned and what do we do now? Interpretation Closing the loop

6 6 Assessment as an Adverb Not more activity (verb), but shift in approach to the activity (adverb) Focus on efficiency within time constraints Shifting the focus from assessment to Chemistry Not our work v. their work Honor the work of Chemistry Thinking as Chemists about how we do Chemistry Reflection in/through/about the work of Chemistry

7 7 Assessment as an Adverb: Information Literacy at Muhlenberg College Goals of Assessment To develop institutional standards for information literacy To identify ways that the library can partner with faculty to support information literacy goals HEDS Research Practices Survey Assesses students' experiences with academic research, research terms and strategies, and evaluating sources Administered Spring 2009 to FY and SR students Collaboration with Library, FY Seminar program, Assessment Office

8 8 Assessment as an Adverb: Information Literacy at Muhlenberg College Interpreting and Sharing data Library took a leadership role Faculty library liaisons to library Department chairs Closing the loop Library and Faculty Center for Teaching program How to create assignments to develop students information literacy skills? Librarian visits to department meetings How can the library serve department needs?

9 Assessment as an Adverb: Departmental Curricula at Ursinus College Meaningfully Assessing Faculty Ownership is critically important The uniqueness of departments is respected Focus on learning in the Discipline Win – Win Situation Responsibly Assessing Use artifacts created in class Reflect on relationship to departmental learning outcomes Ongoing and evolutionary change 9

10 Assessment as an Adverb: Core Curriculum at Ursinus College Productively Assessing Outcome Assessment Committee Planning Faculty Ownership KISS Principle – Simple and Smart Using NSSE, CLA and others Artifacts from the classroom Senior exit interviews Effectively and Efficiently Bringing About Change 10

11 11 Assessment as an Adverb: Diversity at Washington & Jefferson College Institutional Commitment to Diversity Presidential support Collaborative Teagle grant Goal: Enhance the climate for diversity Formation of a diversity Home Team Reviewing Existing DataInitially Distressing NSSE results: Seniors trailed freshmen; W&J trailed partners Business majors, Science majors lagged Focus groups: Culture of hushed, polite acceptance Typical W&J student: White, rich, Republican, smart, mildly athletic, and from western PA

12 12 Assessment as an Adverb: Diversity at Washington & Jefferson College Upon Further Review... Context matters Demographic challengesWhites, males, Greeks, athletes, 1 st generation, Business majors, Science majors Hidden diversity: SES, ideology, 1 st generation Responding to the Challenges Myth-busting Reaching out: Targeted conversations (Business, Greeks, etc.) Working within preexisting offices and activities Ripple Effects Better understanding of demographicseffects on pedagogy

13 Case Studies How might an adverbial assessment approach work in this situation? How could you work with colleagues to implement this approach? 13

14 Sharing Strategies What are some examples of Adverbial Assessment on your campus? What new opportunities are gained from this model? 14


Download ppt "James M. Sloat, Washington & Jefferson College Kathleen E. Harring, Muhlenberg College Robert Rand Davidson, Ursinus College 2011 AAC&U General Education."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google