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John Tassoni, University Director of Liberal Education, Miami University Jeanne Colleran, Dean, College of Arts and Sciences, John Carroll University Kevin.

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Presentation on theme: "John Tassoni, University Director of Liberal Education, Miami University Jeanne Colleran, Dean, College of Arts and Sciences, John Carroll University Kevin."— Presentation transcript:

1 John Tassoni, University Director of Liberal Education, Miami University Jeanne Colleran, Dean, College of Arts and Sciences, John Carroll University Kevin Hovland, Director, Shared Futures: General Education for a Global Century, AAC&U

2 Rookie Season

3 Thinking Critically Understanding Contexts Engaging Other Learners Acting and Reflecting

4 I. English Composition (6 hours) II. Fine Arts, Humanities, Social Science (9 hours) A. Fine Arts (3 hours) B. Humanities (3 hours) C. Social Science (3 hours) III. Global Perspectives (6 to 9 hours) A. Study Abroad (6 hours fulfills requirement), or B. G-Courses (9 hours), or C. G-Cluster (9 hours) IV. Natural Science (9 hours, include one laboratory course) A. Biological Science (3 hours minimum) B. Physical Science (3 hours minimum) V. Mathematics, Formal Reasoning, Technology (3 hours)

5 Global Perspectives (6 to 9 hours) A. Study Abroad (6 hours fulfills requirement), or B. G-Courses (9 hours), or C. G-Cluster (9 hours)

6 Lux Lifelong Learning (Reflection) Help Teachers Rethink Curriculum in G-Context Pre- and Post-Departure Courses Erosion of Curricular Training? Erosion of U.S. Cultures?

7 FND III: Study Abroad (6 hours)

8 Develop and exercise the ability to communicate and act respectfully across linguistic and cultural differences. Explore and understand their place and influence in the changing world. Determine and assess relationships among societies, institutions, and systems in terms of reciprocal – though not necessarily symmetrical – interactions, benefits, and costs. Describe the development and construction of differences and similarities among contemporary groups and regions. Identify and analyze the origins and influences of global forces.

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10 Develop and exercise the ability to communicate and act respectfully across linguistic and cultural differences. Suggestion: Your description here might include references to how students will have meaningful opportunities to engage transnationally with persons, practices, cultures, and/or experiences in such a way that informs their global perspectives. Learning opportunities might include an extended activity or multiple activities that allow for a sustained focus on this goal and could include: real or virtual engagements via skype video conferences; work on joint research/class projects with classes in other universities (e.g., in a political theory course, engaging in a joint project to write a hypothetical constitution); a joint review and critique of work; sustained, meaningful exchanges that focus on an outcome of the course; collaborative wikis or multimedia content; virtual interaction in a VR cave; or sustained interaction in Second Life; etc.

11 Global Forum & Global FLING

12 English Lack of Reciprocal Benefit Reliance on Technology Affirming Privilege Self/Other Dichotomy & Prolegamenous Preparation Issues (for Inevitable Screw Ups) Presentist

13 Revisions to Existing Courses ATH 175: Peoples of the World GEO 101: Global Forces, Local Diversity HST 198: World History since 1500 ITS 201: Introduction to International Studies ENG 108: Composition and Culture for International Students

14 New Courses AAA/SOC 207: China and Globalization AMS 207: AmericaA Global Context ARC 107: Global Design DST/SPA 212: Deaf Culture: Global, National, Local Issues EAS 266: Metal on Metal: Engineering and Globalization in Heavy Metal Music GTY 260: Global Aging MUS 186: Global Music for the I-POD

15 Resistance to the Preparatory Course Deep Revision (Inside and Outside of FND III) Exploring Genres Vitalizing Co-Curriculum Chance for Collaboration/Inquiry Across Sections Move Toward University-Wide Dialogue on Entire Plan

16 Engaging the World: Globalizing the Curriculum

17 In consonance with the Jesuit tradition of the examination of conscience, a John Carroll University education emphasizes personal responsibility and ethical conduct. A John Carroll University education deepens the values that characterize lives of service, including the integrity to call attention to all forms of discrimination and oppression, the dedication to work persistently on behalf of social justice, and a respect for all human dignity.

18 As world citizens cognizant of global interdependence, John Carroll University students recognize the importance of historical and cultural context in order to promote equitable exchange, respect for difference and pluralism, and environmental responsibility. John Carroll graduates have the skills for civic and professional leadership and productive collaboration.

19 We expect that graduates of John Carroll University will be able to: o 1. Demonstrate an integrative knowledge of human and natural worlds; o 2. Develop habits of critical analysis and aesthetic appreciation; o 3. Apply creative and innovative thinking; o 4. Communicate skillfully in multiple forms of expression; o 5. Act competently in a global and diverse world

20 o 6. Understand and promote social justice; o 7. Apply a framework for examining ethical dilemmas. o 8. Employ leadership and collaborative skills; o 9. Understand the religious dimensions of human experience.

21 Jesuit education has long been committed to praxis or the idea of putting theory into practice. For those steeped in the Jesuit tradition, that sense of praxis has come to mean a deep and abiding commitment to social justice often framed in terms of engaging the world. The Jesuit Core: Divisional requirements Superimposed Requirements: 2 international courses and one diversity

22 Integrate its numerous –but disparatearticulations of global learning into a program that informs our core (general education) requirements and offers a curriculum that draws on the Jesuit tradition emphasizing global citizenship, humanitarian service, and volunteerism forming students with a well-educated solidarity. A well-educated solidarity, then, forms students in the Jesuit tradition of academic excellence to apply their intellectual talents to address the great needs of the world and fashion a more just and humane existence.

23 International Silo approach of culture or nationality One course or one sequence sufficient Politics and culture emphasized; economics Global Integrative Interdisciplinary Not bound to nation state Economics and culture within the symbolic realm Information access Rhizomic Non-state actors Spatial thinking Mapping

24 An emphasis on new kinds of critical evaluation that includes spatial thinking and complex systems analysis, and that engages non-linear models of information assessment and decision making; A focus on the critical understanding of the possibilities and limitations of technology and participatory culture, including ethical issues related to globalization and technology; and The cultivation of moral values as well as the development of practical tools that empower students to address chronic problems and acute instances of social injustice and humanitarian crisis

25 Short Introduction to Globalization Globalization by Arjun Appadurai Selected articles Convergence Culture by Henry Jenkins The Digital Divide GlobalizationParticipatory Culture

26 Integrate issues of global education and citizenship across disciplines in core courses Through learning communities that develop conceptual frameworks around globalization and produce new courses or revise courses. Goal: 45 courses over three years in which issues of globalization are raised.

27 Epidemiology, Health Global Fundamentalisms Globalization and Sustainability Environmental Degradation and Its Consequences Writing Across Conflict Film and Cultural Criticism Participatory Cultures, Geography, and New Media Repressive Regimes, Social Movements, & New Technology Visualizing Complex Data Toward an Ethics of the Future Global Markets Post-conflict Reconciliation

28 Through course development grants, we wish to develop foundational courses that will be required across more specific programs: Globalization Theory Globalization and Technology Globalization and the Environment Globalization and Culture Globalization and Ethics

29 East Asian Studies Peace, Justice and Human Rights International Business, Language and Culture Africana Studies Latin American Studies Modern European Studies Environmental Studies Public Health More sustainable through shared foundation courses

30 East Asian Studies Africana Studies Peace, Justice, Human Rights Latin American Studies Environmental Studies Public Health

31 Determines how our experiential learning, service-learning opportunities, and immersion experiences can be more successfully integrated into core curriculum courses. Humanitarian Response Model: Globalization connected to service projects

32 What do we mean by global learning? What are the student learning outcomes we want to see? Where within the curriculum can students practice to achieve such outcomes? How do we link these curricular experiences to wider learning experiences? How will we recognize and measure global learning?


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