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1 Web Conference 29 April 2010 International Technical Guidance on Sexuality Education Christopher Castle, Chief Section on HIV and AIDS Division for the.

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Presentation on theme: "1 Web Conference 29 April 2010 International Technical Guidance on Sexuality Education Christopher Castle, Chief Section on HIV and AIDS Division for the."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 Web Conference 29 April 2010 International Technical Guidance on Sexuality Education Christopher Castle, Chief Section on HIV and AIDS Division for the Coordination of UN Priorities in Education UNESCO

2 2 Young people account for around 40% of all new adult (15+) HIV infections worldwide Latest data indicate fewer than 40% of young people have basic information about HIV Numerous studies show that with the right information and skills, young people can change their behaviour to reduce the risk of acquiring HIV infection or passing it on to others Young people are clear in their demand for more – and better – sexuality education, services and resources to meet their prevention needs Rationale

3 3 Technical Guidance In December 2009, UNESCO published with UN partners two linked documents which comprise the International Technical Guidance on Sexuality Education: An evidence- informed approach for schools, teachers and health educators Volume I: Rationale for sexuality education – including a review of the evidence base, characteristics of effective programmes Volume II: Sexuality Education - topics and learning objectives

4 4 Purpose Promote an understanding of the need and rationale for comprehensive sexuality education (CSE) Provide a clear understanding of the objectives, components and possible learning outcomes of CSE Provide guidance to education and health authorities on how to build support for CSE Build teacher preparedness and institutional capacity to deliver good quality CSE Offer guidance on CSE materials development

5 5 What it is Voluntary guidance - will have to be implemented within national laws/policies A platform for strengthening HIV prevention amongst children and young people in and out of school An advocacy tool - focusing on why and what about CSE An evidence-informed and rights-based approach for schools, teachers and health educators

6 6 What it isnt Not focused on how to deliver CSE in the classroom Not a curriculum or set of lesson plans Not a set of compulsory standards

7 7 Who is it intended for? Education and health ministries, including: policy level decision-makers curriculum and materials developers school principals, teachers and health educators anyone else involved in the design, delivery and evaluation of sexuality education, in and out of school Policy level decision-makers – why? Programme developers – what?

8 8 Goal of CSE Equip children and young people with knowledge, skills and values to make responsible choices about their sexual and social relationships.

9 9 Methodology Literature review Evaluation of existing curricula (18 examples from across the world) Review of sexuality education programme impact on sexual behaviour (87 studies from around the world including 29 from developing countries) Expansion of Kirbys 17 characteristics of effective programmes Global Technical Consultation, February 09 hosted by the Hewlett Foundation Extensive inputs from UNESCO, UNFPA, WHO, UNICEF, UNAIDS, youth leaders, ministries of education, CSOs and others

10 10 What does the evidence review say? Sexuality education programmes do not increase sexual activity Some sexuality/HIV education programmes: Delay initiation of sexual intercourse Reduce number of sexual partners or Increase use of condoms/contraception Reduce unprotected sex Reduce pregnancy and STI rates Some do none of these

11 review of impact of sexuality education on sexual behaviour Developing Countries (N=29) United States (N=47) Other developed countries (N=11) All countries (N=87) Initiation of sex Delayed initiation % No significant impact % Hastened initiation00000% Frequency of sex Decreased frequency % No significant impact % Increased frequency00113%

12 review of impact of sexuality education on sexual behaviour Developing Countries (N=29) United States (N=47) Other developed countries (N=11) All countries (N=87) Number of sexual partners Decreased number % No significant impact % Increased number 00000% Use of condoms Increased use % No significant impact % Decreased use 00000%

13 review of impact of sexuality education on sexual behaviour Developing Countries (N=29) United States (N=47) Other developed countries (N=11) All countries (N=87) Use of contraception Increased use141640% No significant impact341853% Decreased use01017% Sexual risk-taking Reduced risk % No significant impact % Increased risk10013%

14 14 Approach of the Guidance Global template/provides for adaptation Rights- and values-based Age-appropriate Culturally-sensitive National laws and policies National/community contexts Gender-responsive Benchmarks and building blocks

15 15 Learning Objectives: Key Concepts 1.Relationships 2.Values, Attitudes and Skills 3.Culture, Society and Human Rights 4.Human Development 5.Sexual Behaviour 6.Sexual and Reproductive Health

16 16 Age-appropriate Age levels –Level 1: 5 to 8 years (lower primary) –Level 2: 9 to 12 years (upper primary) –Level 3: 12 to 15 years (lower secondary) –Level 4: 15 to 18 years (upper secondary) Flexibility on content of each level Overlaps to accommodate broad age ranges and older learners at Level 4

17 17 Example of Learning Objective Topics: Families Friendship, Love and Romantic Relationships Tolerance and Respect Long-term Commitment, Marriage and Parenting Sample Learning Objective for Level I, Topic 1: Define the concept of family with examples of different kinds of family structures

18 18 Approaches to school-based programmes Delivered as stand-alone subject Integrated within existing mainstream subject Delivered across several other subjects Included in guidance and counselling

19 19 Good practice Implement programmes that include at least 12 or more sessions Include sequential sessions over several years Select capable and motivated educators to implement the curriculum Provide quality training to educators Provide on-going management, supervision and oversight Guidance also includes characteristics of good programmes

20 20 Building Support Parents are critically important, working in partnership with teachers and schools Building consensus requires advocacy and community education Opposition often stems from mistrust, fear and discomfort Harness support through multiple channels and stakeholders and work together Using evidence on what works when deciding on interventions will help build confidence

21 21 Moving forward Working jointly with national authorities, UNAIDS and cosponsors, and CSO partners at international, regional and country level – key meetings etc Core component of the UNAIDS Outcome Framework – focus on knowledge levels and sexuality education in 1st wave countries Ministerial Declaration in LAC – follow up actions Global launch – IAC Vienna – joint activities with Vienna Youth Force + UNAIDS cosponsors Levers of Success (UNESCO, forthcoming in 2010) – national case studies of sexuality education

22 22 Moving forward HIV and AIDS Clearinghouse – for curriculum resources online check the annotated bibliography Partnership with governments on country level implementation Next stage – costing study on sexuality education programmes – first results available by end of 2010

23 23 Thank You


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