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Hurricane Education and Outreach in the Big Bend Region Mike Porter Alec Bogdanoff July 7, 2006 North Florida Chapter of the American Meteorological Society.

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Presentation on theme: "Hurricane Education and Outreach in the Big Bend Region Mike Porter Alec Bogdanoff July 7, 2006 North Florida Chapter of the American Meteorological Society."— Presentation transcript:

1 Hurricane Education and Outreach in the Big Bend Region Mike Porter Alec Bogdanoff July 7, 2006 North Florida Chapter of the American Meteorological Society

2 What We Do We are a group of meteorology students, faculty, professionals, and community members at-large who are interested in the weather! We are a group of meteorology students, faculty, professionals, and community members at-large who are interested in the weather! We perform educational and community outreach within the Big Bend region, designed to teach people of all ages about hurricanes, preparedness, and the weather in general. We perform educational and community outreach within the Big Bend region, designed to teach people of all ages about hurricanes, preparedness, and the weather in general. We are here today to talk to you all about our role in passing along knowledge about hurricanes to the general public and meteorologists – We are here today to talk to you all about our role in passing along knowledge about hurricanes to the general public and meteorologists – essentially, why they are telling you what they are today!

3 Why is Hurricane Knowledge Important? Since 1851, 52 storms have passed within 50 miles of Thomasville! WHY they do so and WHAT they bring with them are very important to understand for understanding hurricanes! (courtesy NOAA Coastal Data Center)

4 Three Major Tracks… Across Florida from the Atlantic (southeast) Across Florida from the Atlantic (southeast) –Like Hurricane Frances in 2004 –Most common during the peak of the season From the Caribbean (south) From the Caribbean (south) –Like Hurricane Dennis in 2005 –Most common early on in the season From the Gulf (southwest) From the Gulf (southwest) –Like Tropical Storm Bonnie in 2004 –Most common early or late in the season

5 The Why of Hurricane Tracks Hurricanes are steered by larger areas of high and low pressure… How they set up with respect to one another determines where the storm goes! Early in the year, storms tend to form in the Gulf and head this way. During mid-season, they tend to form out in the Atlantic. Late in the season, hurricanes tend to form closer to the US, but are usually kept away from here by cold fronts passing through as we move into fall!

6 …Three Major Impacts… Winds Winds –Hurricane Kate in 1985 –Image from State of Florida/ Capital Area Red Cross Website of Tharpe St. in Tallahassee Rainfall Rainfall –Tropical Storm Allison in 2001 –Over 10 of rain across N. Florida and S. Georgia in a 24-hr span Waves & Storm Surge Waves & Storm Surge –Hurricane Dennis in 2005 –Covered by the Natl. Weather Service in their talk earlier (courtesy SE Regional Climate Center)

7 Any questions? Thank you! Visit us on the web! //


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