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SOMETIMES … A SCREAM IS BETTER THAN A THESIS KUMBAYA RADICAL COLLABORATION SYSTEMIC PARTNERSHIPS James G. Neal Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners.

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Presentation on theme: "SOMETIMES … A SCREAM IS BETTER THAN A THESIS KUMBAYA RADICAL COLLABORATION SYSTEMIC PARTNERSHIPS James G. Neal Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners."— Presentation transcript:

1 SOMETIMES … A SCREAM IS BETTER THAN A THESIS KUMBAYA RADICAL COLLABORATION SYSTEMIC PARTNERSHIPS James G. Neal Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners Massachusetts Library System 15 May 2012

2 2 REVOLUTIONARY CHANGE David Close (The Meaning of Revolution): …the essential feel of revolution derives from its cataclysmic quality… it destroys peoples security and unsettles their convictions. Thomas Kuhn (The Structure of Scientific Revolutions): … the transition from a paradigm in crisis to a new one from which a new tradition can emerge is far from a cumulative process. Karl Marx (Theory of Epistemology/Theory of Ideas): …Ideas do not exist on their own…they are real only when they are translated into action. Quantitative change and qualitative change.

3 3 PROGRESSIVE CHANGE All progress is based on a universal innate desire on the part of an organism to live beyond its income. (Samuel Butler) Those who speak most of progress measure it by quantity and not by quality. (George Santayana) Progress lies not in enhancing what is, but in advancing toward what will be. (Kahlil Gibran) Progress-movement toward a goal steady improvement

4 4 SOME DEFINITIONS Primal Innovation creativity as first importance, as a fundamental component of organizational and individual DNA Radical Collaboration drastic or sweeping energy, and not Kumbaya Deconstruction taking apart the axioms or rules, or the incoherence of a concept, position or word Survival not relevance or impact, but persistence and adaptation

5 QUESTIONS TO CONSIDER What is the NEW NORMAL? What TECHNOLOGIES are having greatest impact? How are we thinking and behaving differently about COLLECTIONS and SERVICES? What has been the effect on LIBRARY ROLES? What has been the impact on ORGANIZATION and STAFF SKILLS? 5

6 6 WHAT ARE THE CORE RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE LIBRARY? Information Selection Information Acquisition Information Synthesis Information Navigation Information Dissemination Information Interpretation Information Understanding Information Use Information Application Information Archiving In Support of Teaching and Learning In Support of Research and Scholarship

7 7 CHANGING LIBRARY ROLES Libraries as Consumers Libraries as Intermediaries and Aggregators Libraries as Publishers Libraries as Educators Libraries as R&D Organizations Libraries as Entrepreneurs Libraries as Policy Advocates

8 8 THE SHIFTING VISION OF THE LIBRARY Legacy Infrastructure Repository Portal Enterprise Public Interest

9 9 TREND #1 CUSTOMIZATION/PERSONAL WEB RAPIDLY SHIFTING USER BEHAVIORS AND EXPECTATIONS SOCIAL NETWORKING COLLECTIVE INTELLIGENCE NEW LITERACIES

10 10 TREND #2 AUTOMATE OLD WORKFLOWS SHALLOW EXPERTISE NEW COMBINATIONS RESISTANCE TO OUTSOURCING REDUNDANT INEFFICIENT LIBRARY OPERATIONS

11 11 TREND #3 AGING AND INEFFECTIVE SERVICE PARADIGMS DISCOVERY FAILURES USER ALTERNATIVES SAGE AT THE DESK

12 12 TREND #4 POLYCENTRISM DISCONNECTED AND UNEVEN LIBRARY DEVELOPMENT WEAK PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS AND FORUMS

13 13 TREND #5 MUTABILITY CONSTANT CHANGE HYBRID STRUCTURES MAVERICK STRATEGIES

14 14 TREND #6 NEW ECONOMIC CONTEXT HOW DO WE RESPOND TO SMALLER BUDGETS REDUCED PURCHASING POWER LESS POLITICAL SUPPORT COMPETITION FOR RESOURCES

15 15 TREND #7 ACCOUNTABILITY/ASSESSMENT HOW DO WE KNOW? IF WE ARE ADVANCING INSTITUTIONAL GOALS ADVANCING COMMUNITY GOALS SUPPORTING USER OBJECTIVES SERVING NATIONAL INTERESTS

16 16 TREND #8 ACCELERATION OF COLLECTIVE INNOVATION APPS REVOLUTION ENTREPENEURIAL IMPERATIVE

17 17 TREND #9 GEO-EVERYTHING GEO-LOCATION GEO-TAGGING GIS/MOBILE APPLICATIONS SMART OBJECTS/SPACES

18 18 TREND #10 SCALE AND NETWORK EFFECTS THROUGH AGGREGATION MOVING OPERATIONS AND SERVICES TO THE CLOUD

19 19 TREND #11 COMMON SHARED RESOURCES FOCUS ON UNIQUE RESOURCES FUTURE OF COLLECTION DEVELOPMENT LIE OF COORDINATION LICENSING OF CONTENT WEB ROT AND FUTURE OF SCHOLARSHIP GOLDEN AGE OF SPECIAL COLLECTIONS

20 20 TREND #12 NEW MAJORITY LEARNER EPISODIC DISTANT OTHER-DIRECTED CAREER-FOCUSED

21 21 TREND #13 OPENNESS OPEN ARCHIVESOPEN DATA OPEN DESIGNOPEN SOURCE OPEN COURSE CONTENTOPEN LINKING OPEN TEXTBOOKSOPEN ACCESS

22 22 TREND #14 DEFORMALISM AND DESTRUCTURING OF SCHOLARSHIP OPEN ACCESS FUTURE OF SCHOLARLY MONOGRAPH WEB COMMUNICATION RESPOSITORY MOVEMENT SCHOLARLY REVIEW

23 23 TREND #15 – NEW TECHNOLOGIES EDUCAUSE HORIZON REPORT Mobiles (single, portable multi-purpose device) Cloud Computing (distributed processing and applications) Geo-Everything (geolocation and geotagging) Personal Web (customized management of online content) Semantic-Aware Applications (meaning to provide answers) Smart Objects (links physical world with information) Open Content (wide distribution and repurposing) Electronic Book (platforms, applications, redefinition) Data/Big Science (research information management) Games As Learning Tools (participation and interaction) Visualization and Simulation (more meaningful and intuitive)

24 24 U.S. LIBRARY DEVELOPMENT -1950Period of EXCLUSIVITY 1950-1970Period of POPULARIZATION 1970-1990Period of DISCORD 1990-2010Period of DECADENCE 2010-2015Period of POLYGAMY 2015-2020Period of PARABIOSIS 2020-Period of PARTICULARISM

25 DEFINING CHARACTERISTICS/TRENDS Collection Development User Services Preservation/Archiving Library Management Systems Digital and Network Technologies Facilities/Space Planning 25

26 DEFINING CHARACTERISTICS/TRENDS Teaching and Learning Research and Scholarship Library/Researcher Relationships Assessment/Accountability Organization and Communication Relationship To Community 26

27 DEFINING CHARACTERISTICS/TRENDS Professional Roles/Staffing Governance and Leadership Budgets and Planning Cooperation and Networking Fundraising/Resource Attraction Information Policy/Political Process 27

28 28 WHO ARE OUR USERS? Students (diversity abounds) Faculty (expectations galore) Researchers (tribal differences) Administration (the bottom line) Community (local politics) Working Professionals (practical applications) Alumni and Donors (largely ignored) World on the Web (the new majority)

29 29 WHERE DO WE INTERSECT WITH USERS? Physical Spaces Web Spaces Collections Services Applications Technologies Classroom Laboratory Bedside Collaborations Anyone Anywhere Anytime Anyhow

30 30 HOW DO WE KNOW ABOUT USERS? Ask Measure Listen Observe Compare Benchmark Experiment Involve Prototype Portfolio Evaluate Experience (Aha)

31 31 ENHANCE THE USER EXPERIENCE Technology Ubiquity Point-of-Need Information Web-based Services Technology Sandbox Privacy Space Social Success Support Services Information Fluency Post-graduate Access Career Assistance

32 32 RESPOND TO USER EXPECTATIONS Content Access Convenience New Capabilities Cost Reduction Participation Individual Productivity Individual Control Organizational Productivity

33 33 EMBRACE THE HUMAN OBJECTIVES Success (turn out well, attain desired end) Happiness (well-being and contentment) Productivity (achieving results or benefits) Progress (forward movement or betterment) Relationships (personal connections or attachments) Experiences (observation or participation) Impact (significant effect)

34 34 TRADITION OF LIBRARY COOPERATION Library Systems Local and Regional Cooperation State Projects Multi-State Projects National Consortia/Projects International Partnerships Researcher Collaboration Publisher Collaboration Collaboration with Technology Organizations Corporate Partnerships Business Partnerships REACHING OUT TO CULTURAL COMMUNITY PROMOTING NEW COMBINATIONS THRU PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS

35 35 AREAS OF SUCCESSFUL COLLABORATION Licensing of Electronic Resources Cooperative Cataloging Interlibrary Loan/Document Delivery Information Policy Advocacy Offsite Shelving Facilities Digital Archiving

36 36 ARENAS FOR RADICAL COLLABORATION Centers for Excellence Mass Production New Infrastructure New Initiatives Quality/Productivity/Innovation

37 37 RADICAL COLLABORATION SOME REQUIREMENTS Bi- and Tri-Lateral Combinations Sustainability/Business Plan Legal Framework Governance Structure Risk Capital Competitive Spirit

38 38 2CUL PROJECT What is 2CUL? A transformative and enduring partnership between two major academic research libraries based on a broad integration of resources, collections, services and expertise.

39 39 2CUL PROJECT Why the Columbia and Cornell University Libraries? Major research libraries New York state Private Ivy institutions Similar academic characteristics Record of collaboration Record of innovation Budget challenges Will and interest

40 40 2CUL PROJECT What are the goals of 2CUL? Achieve major integration of operations, services, collections and resources Reduce cost of overall library activities to direct resources to new priority areas Increase revenues through joint proposals for funding, new products and services, and business opportunities marketed to academic and research customers Establish an independent service entity and governance structure that supports 2CUL Expand 2CUL beyond initial partners, and model collaboration for other groups of research libraries and for other divisions at the university

41 41 2CUL PROJECT Where are we initially focusing our work? Technical services (acquisitions, cataloging, e-resource management) Collection development/global resources Technology infrastructure/digital preservation Communications Resource development New services for students and faculty New business/entrepreneurial services for other libraries Business planning and governance

42 BUSINESS PLANNING Achieving major integration of operations, services, collections and resources Reducing cost of overall library activities to direct resources to new priorities Increasing revenues through joint proposals Offering services to other libraries Bringing in other parties; building strategic partnerships 42

43 COLLECTIVE COLLECTION CHALLENGES Institutional identity, faculty acceptance Better sense of overlaps and gaps Financial restrictions, accounting systems Delivery mechanisms, legal issues Outreach/research support for faculty and students 43

44 BACKROOM FUNCTIONS CHALLENGES System of credits for work done on behalf of others Standard definitions of good enough Budgets/funding streams Shared backend systems across institutions 44

45 WHAT WILL SUCCESS LOOK LIKE? Enabling pre-requisites; user buy-in Expanded collections and services for our faculty and students Co-investment in critical under-supported areas From me and thee to we Resolved governance, co-ownership, budgetary, legal, and institutional issues Shared measures for success and impact Additional partners, provide collaborative model 45

46 SOME AH HA MOMENTS Bringing two organizations together to perpetuate traditional library models is not a goal but a dead end Its got to be seen as being about more not less Enabling prerequisites for radical collaboration are key Appreciating cultural differences and need for face time Importance of trusted third party at the table Early wins are needed, not always in areas you expect Sometimes quick wins not possible, focus on longer-term benefits that will pay off 46

47 OTHER COLUMBIA PARTNERSHIPS (Period of Polygamy) Research Collections and Preservation Consortium ReCAP Manhattan Research Libraries Initiative MaRLI Ivies Plus Libraries Borrow Direct HathiTrust and DuraSpace and Portico… 47

48 48 SYSTEMIC CHANGE #1 LAST COPY PRINT REPOSITORY NETWORK HOW MANY? WHERE? WHAT REQUIREMENTS? SPACE IMPACTS SERVICE IMPACTS

49 49 SYSTEMIC CHANGE #2 NATIONAL PUBLIC DIGITAL LIBRARY MASS DIGITIZATION PROJECT DIGITIZATION BORN DIGITAL KNOWLEDGE COMMONS DOT-LIB DOMAIN

50 50 SYSTEMIC CHANGE #3 NATIONAL CONTENT LICENSING PROGRAM OPEN ACCESS AGENDA PRICE TERMS STANDARDS

51 51 SYSTEMIC CHANGE #4 WEB SITE AND WEB DOCUMENT CAPTURE/CURATION/ARCHIVING WHAT ABOUT INTERNET ARCHIVE? DOCUMENTING EVERYTHING? WRITING HISTORY SCHOLARSHIP UNDERMINED

52 52 PRESERVE AND ARCHIVE THE CONTENT (DIGITAL PRESERVATION NETWORK) Archive as RepositoryHOLD Archive as PersistenceACCESS Archive as CurationSECURE Archive as Steward CARE Analog Digital Conversion Born Digital Disaster Preparedness SYSTEMIC CHANGE #5

53 53 SYSTEMIC CHANGE #6 E-RESEARCH CYBERINFRASTRUCTURE RESEARCH INFORMATION MANAGEMENT RESEARCHER SOLUTIONS GOVERNMENT FUNDING VENDOR INITIATIVES LIBRARY ROLE

54 54 SYSTEMIC CHANGE #7 GLOBAL RESOURCES NETWORK INTERNATIONAL COLLABORATION FOREIGN ACQUISITIONS LANGUAGE CATALOGING GLOBAL EDUCATION AND RESEARCH GLOBAL WEB

55 55 SYSTEMIC CHANGE #8 REGIONAL NETWORK OF LIBRARY SERVICE AGENCIES CATALOGING PRESERVATION DIGITIZATION

56 56 SYSTEMIC CHANGE #9 INFORMATION MANAGEMENT APPS ENTERPRISE NATIONAL LIBRARY PROGRAM WHO DEFINES INFORMATION DISCOVERY USE AND APPLICATION?

57 57 SYSTEMIC CHANGE #10 LIBRARY RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM AND CONSORTIUM INFORMATION POOR INFORMATION PROFESSION DATA-DRIVEN DECISION MAKING

58 58 SYSTEMIC CHANGE #11 COORDINATED MARKETING AND QUALITY ASSESSMENT INSANITY OF ROI DEFINING AND DOCUMENTING VALUE

59 59 SYSTEMIC CHANGE #12 NEW STANDARDS FOR LIBRARY SPACE THE TROMPE LOEIL LIBRARY LEARNING SPACE SOCIAL SPACE COLLABORATIVE SPACE COMMUNITY SPACE FLEXIBILITY AND ADAPTABILITY

60 60 SYSTEMIC CHANGE #13 INFORMATION LITERACY STOP THE MADNESS ACADEMIC CRUTCH WHAT DIFFERENCE DO WE MAKE? CAN INFORMATION LITERACY ACTUALLY BE TAUGHT? BETTER TO INVEST IN MARKETING AND ACADEMIC INTEGRATION

61 61 SYSTEMIC CHANGE #14 MULTIPLE PATHS TO LIBRARY WORK FUTURE OF MLS MANDATORY CE/CERTIFICATION

62 62 FERAL PROFESSIONALS IN THE INFORMATION ORGANIZATION Professionals With Diverse Academic Credentials Wide Range of New Professional Assignments Professional Roles of Support Staff and Students Impact on Values, Outlooks, Styles, Expectations Impact on Community Understanding, Recognition, Respect Impact on Organizational Relevance and Impact

63 63 EXPECTATIONS FOR THE INFORMATIONAL PROFESSIONAL Commitment to Rigor Commitment to Research and Development Commitment to Assessment and Evaluation Communication and Marketing Skills Political Engagement Project Development and Management Skills Entrepreneurial Spirit Commitment to Collaboration Resource Development Skills Leadership/Inspirational Capacity Deep Subject or Technical Expertise Deep Service Commitment

64 64 SYSTEMIC CHANGE #15 CREATE LIBRARY PAC POLITICAL ACTION COMMITTEE POLITICAL CANDIDATE SUPPORT SUPPORT/OPPOSE LEGISLATION

65 65 ADVOCATE THE INFORMATION POLICY AGENDA INTELLECTUAL FREEDOM PRIVACY CIVIL LIBERTIES EDUCATION PROGRAMS RESEARCH PROGRAMS INTERNET DEVELOPMENT TELECOMMUNICATIONS GOVERNMENT INFORMATION APPROPRIATIONS WORKFORCE POLICY FIGHTING THE COPYRIGHT WARS HOPE/POWER/ACTION THROUGH COLLABORATION

66 WHERE ARE WE GOING? RELEVANCE IMPACT VALUE SURVIVAL EXTINCTION TERMINAL – termination of species/no descendants PHYLETIC – one species evolves into another 66

67 67 HOW DO WE FEEL? Anxious - an abnormal and overwhelming sense of apprehension and fear Disrupted - interruption of normal course or unity, thrown into disorder Chaotic - state of utter confusion, unpredictability in the behavior of complex systems Our age of anxiety is, in great part, the result of trying to do todays jobs with yesterdays tools. Marshall McLuhan One of the litmus tests is that a disruptive technology enables a larger population of less skilled people to do things that historically only an expert could. Clayton Christensen The Innovators Dilemma Chaos often breeds life, when order breeds habit. Education of Henry Adams


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