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Stages of Phase I: 1. Focus groups of Somali Bantu men, women, & children to determine health literacy level 2. Somali Bantu cultural competency conference.

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Presentation on theme: "Stages of Phase I: 1. Focus groups of Somali Bantu men, women, & children to determine health literacy level 2. Somali Bantu cultural competency conference."— Presentation transcript:

1 Stages of Phase I: 1. Focus groups of Somali Bantu men, women, & children to determine health literacy level 2. Somali Bantu cultural competency conference for 120 health professionals 3. Curriculum development, policy manual, and creation of learning materials 4. Assembly of gift bags containing health and home safety items 5. Training and certification of interpreters 6. Recording of MP3 health brochures in two Bantu languages (Kizigua & Maay Maay) 7. Home health education visits by nurse, clinical informationist and interpreter 8. Cleaning classes and supplies to reduce insect infestation 9. Referrals to English as second language (ESL) Literacy Volunteer tutors 10. Referrals to social agencies (food bank, dental care, Head Start, etc.) Learning Topics for Home Visits: Nutrition Dental Care Handwashing Hygiene Immunization Home safety Lead poisoning Thermometer use Cultural Research Curriculum Planning Development of learning materials Production of policy manual Assisting nurse in home health teaching Data Collection Conference planning Cultural education for health professionals Data analysis Collection of multilingual health information Conclusion: The Clinical Informationist played a critical role in the development and implementation of the program, demonstrating that unconventional medical library services can add value and support to community health projects. Focus Group Summary of Outcomes: Men : 1. Consensus that the quality of life in America is better than life in Africa We are living like people in paradise. In U.S.A. now Im eating any food I want I get it! We are very very fortunate! 2. Spoke of abundance of food in America, therefore obesity may be a risk 3. Common concern that English lessons are not offered during non-work hours 4. Impressed that American teachers do not beat the students, indicating a cultural difference in regard to violence and abuse 5. Did not understand the concept of immunization Women : 1. Want information about social services (Medicaid, etc.) 2. The women did not speak English; Extensive need for continuing ESL tutors 3. Children being bullied at school America good. No fighting except in school. 4. Interest in learning about nutrition 5. Did not understand concept of immunization Age 11-13 : 1. Talked about eating pizza and cookies for breakfast; Need nutritional information. 2. Bantu do not eat pork; The children prefer poultry, goat, rice & pasta. 3. Dangers of smoking, drugs and alcohol were being addressed at school 4. This age group had been exposed to the most health information of the 4 Age 8-10 : 1. Not fluent in English as the older children were; May be a need for early intervention through programs such as the Head Start 2. Stated that they enjoyed fruit such as pineapple and bananas 3. Had no understanding of germs or handwashing 4. Knew that it is important to brush their teeth; explained that the reason is to prevent bad breath; did not know what a cavity is To support and improve fundamentals of health care for children in poverty, and bridge gaps in services traditionally provided for refugees. 30 Bantu mothers were revisited and answered post-test questions 6 months after health education: Sample of post-test Q & A Q1. Are poisons out of childrens reach? Q2. Are outlet covers in sockets? Q3. Did you use the thermometer? Q4. Can you identify 2 healthy foods? Q5. Can you explain why we wash our hands? Q6. Can you explain why your children need shots? Q7. Do you put your perishable food in the refrigerator immediately upon return from shopping? Author/Affiliations : Elaine Mosher, MLS, Kaleida Health, Buffalo NY; Elizabeth Eisenhauer, RN, MLS, Kaleida Health, Buffalo NY; Diane G. Schwartz, MLS, AHIP, FMLA, Kaleida Health, Buffalo NY; Sister Helen Anne Wolf, RN, Jericho Road Family Practice, Buffalo NY; Donna Slawek, NP, Kaleida Health, Buffalo NY; Kavita P. Ahluwalia DDS, MPH, Columbia University, NY,NY; Karen Lamson, MLS, Kaleida Health, Buffalo NY; Tracy Diina, Director, Literacy Volunteers of America, Buffalo, NY; Myron Glick, MD, Jericho Road Family Practice, Buffalo NY. This project was made possible by : The Community Health Foundation of Western and Central New York The Community Health Foundation is a non-profit private foundation with a mission to improve the health and health care of the people of Western and Central New York. History: The Bantu were a persecuted minority in Somalia. During civil war they were forced into refugee camps in Kenya. In 2002 U.S. Immigration and Naturalization were authorized to bring the Bantu to the United States to be resettled. Over 500 Bantu are at home in Buffalo, New York.


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