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#28 Jumping into Battle: Taking the Information Revolution to the Bedside Cheri G. Smith, MLS Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center RESULTS The presence.

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Presentation on theme: "#28 Jumping into Battle: Taking the Information Revolution to the Bedside Cheri G. Smith, MLS Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center RESULTS The presence."— Presentation transcript:

1 #28 Jumping into Battle: Taking the Information Revolution to the Bedside Cheri G. Smith, MLS Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center RESULTS The presence of a librarian on clinical rounds was well-accepted by the medical team. A two-day per week schedule was agreed upon as the best use of personnel resources. Unanticipated results: The director of the burn unit, after hearing of the medicine rounds, requested a clinical librarian attend his weekly burn rounds The librarian was named Teacher of the Year for the residency program During medicine rounds, the librarian noted that classic articles were recommended for reading by team members. After consultation, a classic articles database was created and made available to all departments via the medical center intranet REFERENCES Marshall JG and Neufeld VR A randomized trial of librarian educational participation in clinical settings. J Med Educ May;56(5): Miller N and Kaye D. The experience of a department of medicine with a clinical medical library service. J Med Educ May;60(5): Health Info Libr J Jun;21(2): Sladek RM, Pinnock C, Phillips PA. The informationist in Australia: a feasibility study. Health Info Libr J Jun;21(2): Ward, L A survey of UK clinical librarianship: February 2004 Health Info Libr J Mar;22(1): CONCLUSIONS Implementation of a limited clinical librarian program is feasible and may result in unanticipated benefits. While librarians may initially see their main contribution as supplying clinically relevant material, clinical staff state that the librarians contribution adds enormously to the educational value of rounds. PURPOSE Our goals were to: Determine the best balance between resources and effectiveness in terms of librarian time Determine whether the librarian would be accepted as part of the clinical team Determine whether other benefits would accrue to the library as a result of participation in rounds At the time, the library had a total staff of six, only two of whom were professional librarians. We attempted to determine whether it is possible to create a successful limited clinical librarianship program within a teaching hospital associated with a major medical school. BACKGROUND Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center hosts the Internal Medicine residency program for the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. Two years ago a faculty member in the residency program visited the library director and asked whether one of the library staff would be willing to attend rounds and research questions arising during discussion of patient symptoms and/or treatment. We had initial concerns about whether participation would place a drain on other library resources, but began rounding daily with his resident team on a trial basis, planning to reassess both cost and success after two months. MATERIALS & METHODS The rounding team consists of an attending physician, a second- or third-year resident, and two interns. Occasionally there will be an observer from a foreign medical school or a subintern participant, or up to three medical students on clinical rotation for a period of several weeks. A typical session with the Department of Medicine will consist of prerounds discussion of newly admitted patients and updates on the more seriously ill of the previously admitted patients. Rounding will begin with the clinical librarian, the attending physician, resident, and intern responsible for a group of patients. The other intern will attend to other business until paged after the first intern has completed his/her patient presentations. The session generally lasts between 90 and 180 minutes. Due to time constraints, the librarian attends from 9 am to 11am, sometimes extending the session to Noon for especially busy sessions. Education Burn Rounds are limited by the director to 60 minutes. A Palm Tungsten C is carried during rounds for recording names of participants and any questions that may arise during the rounds process. The librarian records questions directly posed or merely unresolved questions discussed among participants. After returning to the office she researches the questions and saves an html document of the search session results. These results, together with any pdf documents of articles available online, and a pdf of the search history are then sent to all attendees via .


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