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Sue Robertson, REFP President, Planning Alliance Alex C. James, AIA Director, SC Office of School Facilities Planning for Schools As Centers of Community.

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Presentation on theme: "Sue Robertson, REFP President, Planning Alliance Alex C. James, AIA Director, SC Office of School Facilities Planning for Schools As Centers of Community."— Presentation transcript:

1 Sue Robertson, REFP President, Planning Alliance Alex C. James, AIA Director, SC Office of School Facilities Planning for Schools As Centers of Community CEFPI Conference San Diego September 2008

2 We made the case …that educators and school boards have to be much more open to reaching out to the entire community in the design and planning of our schools. Those school districts that do this well are seeing the direct benefit from this effort. They have come to realize that the school is the community - that the democratic aspirations of the community are lived daily by how people in the community come together to use the school as a community - wide anchor. U.S. Secretary of Education Richard W. Riley March 26, 1999

3 Schools Are Not the Only Infrastructure As we look at the political will of communities, educators need to realize that communities are faced with increasing needs from all sectors: highways, water and sewer, downtown revitalization, etc. How do schools step up to the challenge to provide ongoing educational needs as well as meeting community needs to make themselves more viable?

4 Programming for Community Schools The State Department of Education in SC does not have jurisdiction over programming for school facilities beyond education requirements. The Office of School Facilities enforces only code and regulatory requirements. School Districts program their schools and are already overwhelmed with state and federal requirements.

5 Whose Problem Is Poverty? If you send 2 groups of students to equally high-quality schools, the group with greater socioeconomic disadvantage will necessarily have lower average achievement than the more fortunate group. Rothstein, Richard. Whose Problem Is Poverty. ASCD – Educational Leadership, April 2008

6 Low income children often have no health insurance and no routine preventive medical and dental care, leading to more absence. Children in low-income families are more prone to asthma, leading to sleeplessness and irritability. They experience lower birth weight as well as more lead poisoning and iron-deficiency anemia, leading to diminished cognitive ability and more behavior problems. Rothstein, Richard. Whose Problem Is Poverty. ASCD – Educational Leadership, April 2008 Whose Problem Is Poverty?

7 Their families frequently fall behind in rent and move more often, losing continuity of instruction. Poor children, in general, are not read aloud to as often or exposed to complex language and large vocabularies A 1995 study of families living in poverty found that children living in families receiving welfare heard approximately 10 million words by age three; children in families in which parents were classified as professionals heard approximately 30 million words in the same period.C Rothstein, Richard. Whose Problem Is Poverty. ASCD – Educational Leadership, April 2008 Whose Problem Is Poverty?

8 Trend 1: The Baby Boomers vs. the New Majority What is Occurring: In 1980 about 75% of this countrys school-age population was white. By 2040 the combination of Hispanics and African-Americans will constitute the majority of youth. They will, on average, come from homes where: the chances of living in poverty are greater; parents are less likely to be well educated; access to pre-school experiences to develop readiness skills is limited, and health care is insufficient (pre-natal and natal). Educational Facilities within the Context of a Changing 21st Century America. By Kenneth R. Stevenson, University of South Carolina, 2006, National Clearinghouse for Educational Facilities

9 Bolivia Elementary 2000 Census

10 Jessie Mae Monroe Elementary 2000 Census

11 Trend 1: The Baby Boomers vs. the New Majority The Issues: Baby boomers will have the numbers, the wealth, and a history of political activism that will yield great control over the political process. They will likely demand that public dollars be spent on health care, adult recreational facilities, and good roads. Educational Facilities within the Context of a Changing 21st Century America. By Kenneth R. Stevenson, University of South Carolina, 2006, National Clearinghouse for Educational Facilities

12 Facility Implications: Educational systems will find it increasingly difficult to get support for bond referenda. Schools must be full-service centers Policy Implications: Educators and policymakers should explore ways to re-conceptualize the place called school. School: a place that any member of the community, regardless of age, can come most any time for personal development, human services support, and human interaction. Educational Facilities within the Context of a Changing 21st Century America. By Kenneth R. Stevenson, University of South Carolina, 2006, National Clearinghouse for Educational Facilities Trend 1: The Baby Boomers vs. the New Majority

13 This Is Not an Attempt to Ask School Districts to Do More It is an attempt to dialogue with school districts and legislators to determine if there is merit in the community school concept. How can this be developed without adding more bureaucracy? Eisenhower Community Center & Elementary School Hopkins, Minnesota Cuningham Group Architecture, PA

14 U N I F I E D N E W O R L E A N S P L A N RECOVERYandREBUILDING Concordia Architecture & Planning

15 schools as centers of community 1. Enhance learning for all students 2. Schools as Centers of Community 3. Involve all stakeholders 4. Maximize available resources 5. Health and Safety 6. Flexibility Concordia Architecture & Planning

16 Maximize Resources Public and private investments must be mutually beneficial and reinforcing to the community as a whole. Paul Farmer, FAICP Executive Director and CEO American Planning Association Feb 14, 2008, NCEFP

17 N E X U S P L A N N I N G PROGRAMS Concordia Architecture & Planning

18 Shared Community Resources Could Include A Community Library and Media Center K-8 Learning Center A Community Health Center Emergency Services A Community Garden A Fitness Center A Recycling Center A Transit Station Shops and Restaurants Concordia Architecture & Planning

19 community nexus center Concordia Architecture & Planning

20 Senior Center Adult Learning Center Classrooms Community Fitness Center Community Media Center Performing Arts Center Child Care Center Community Meeting Hall Tishomingo County Education Complex Iuka, Mississippi Concordia Architecture & Planning

21 Community Meeting Hall Tishomingo County Education Complex Iuka, Mississippi Concordia Architecture & Planning

22 Health Clinic

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24 Community Health Care There are quasi public, nonprofits that place young physicians in needy areas for periods of time to fulfill an obligation the nonprofit places on them for paying medical education expenses. What if these young professionals (doctors and dentist) were placed in or near school related facilities?

25 Health Care Sources South Carolina Office of Rural Health www.scorh.net Dr. Amy Martin, Deputy Director USC Rural Health Research Center Dr. Paul Demarco, Director Francis Marion University Rural Comm. Health Programs www.pdemarco@fmarion.edu

26 Raising Social Order The educational system of a country is worthless unless it revolutionizes the social order. Dr. Carter G. Woodson

27 Raising Social Order The road out of the poorhouse, leads thru the schoolhouse. Rep. Gilda Cobb-Hunter South Carolina House

28 Sumter SC School District 17 Child care center for children ages 6 months and up

29 Public School Assets for Community Use Athletic Facilities – Gyms, Playing Fields Auditoriums Cafeterias Eisenhower Community Center & Elementary School Hopkins, Minnesota Cuningham Group Architecture, PA

30 Public School Assets for Community Use Libraries Classrooms Health Centers Other –Virtual classrooms, –K-19 –Future solutions Rock Hill School District – Natatorium constructed by the school district – managed & maintained by the local YMCA

31 Planning for Schools As Centers of Community May there never develop in me the notion that my education is complete, but give me the strength and leisure and zeal continually to enlarge my knowledge. Maimonedes – 12 th century

32 Aiken Model: Citizens Tax Work-Off Program

33 Analysis Instrument ComponentHealthcare Potential Private/Public Sector Alternate User Pediatrician Potential Building Cost Savings50% Potential Operating Cost Savings100% Potential Liability??? Security Potential SolutionZoning James Elementary School

34 So, Where Do We Go Now? Start Develop your own community school Utilize the analysis instrument Alternative Use + Potential Building / Operating Cost Savings + Potential Liability + Potential Solutions Challenge the imagination of the community Honor the political will of the community

35 Many schools are like little islands set apart from the mainland of life by a deep moat of convention and tradition. A drawbridge is lowered at certain periods during the day in order that the part-time inhabitants may cross over to the island in the morning and back to the mainland at night. Why do these young people go out to the island? They go there in order to learn how to live on the mainland. W. G. Carr. (1942) Linking Schools with Life. In F.C. Bingham (ed.) Community Life in a Democracy. Chicago: National Congress of Parents and Teachers

36 Do Community Schools Work? If so, HOW DO WE MOVE FORWARD????

37 Potential Organization OWNERARCHITECT FACILITATOR LEGAL ALTERNATE USER

38 When Do You Start? Allow at least 2 years for the community process to determine what programs to include and necessary support Land banking

39 For schools to change turf protection will have to fall

40 The Economy As we look at efficiency in our use of energy in our facilities, so we will increasingly need to be efficient with the moneys expended for these facilities. As the value of the dollar decreases, this is another way to more efficiently use our tax dollars.

41 Scotland

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43 Good enough for yesterday will not serve as good enough for tomorrow. Ted Sizer

44 Can We Facilitate At the end of the day, the success of the community schools will be the ability to evolve how we merge education as a seamless component of our society. The hope and trust is that American ingenuity is still viable enough to make it happen.

45 Websites for Community Schools www.edfacilities.org/rl/index.cfm (National Clearinghouse for Educational Facilities), see Preplanningwww.edfacilities.org/rl/index.cfm www.cefpi.org (Council of Educational Facilities Planners International)www.cefpi.org www.richardrileyaward (Centers of Community)www.richardrileyaward

46 Contact Us Alex James ajames@ed.sc.gov Sue Robertson srobertson@planning-alliance.com


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