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The DESSA Comprehensive System: A New Tool to Assess Social-Emotional Strengths & Resilience Paul A. LeBuffe, Devereux Center for Resilient Children Valerie.

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Presentation on theme: "The DESSA Comprehensive System: A New Tool to Assess Social-Emotional Strengths & Resilience Paul A. LeBuffe, Devereux Center for Resilient Children Valerie."— Presentation transcript:

1 The DESSA Comprehensive System: A New Tool to Assess Social-Emotional Strengths & Resilience Paul A. LeBuffe, Devereux Center for Resilient Children Valerie B. Shapiro, University of Washington Jack A. Naglieri, University of Virginia & Devereux Center for Resilient Children © 2010 Devereux Center for Resilient Children 1

2 Todays Goals Review the context for the DESSA Review the context for the DESSA Present the DESSA Comprehensive System Present the DESSA Comprehensive System Discuss applications in the schools Discuss applications in the schools 2

3 The Devereux Center for Resilient Children © 2010 Devereux Center for Resilient Children 3

4 DCRC Mission DCRC Mission The mission of the DCRC is to promote social and emotional development, foster resilience, and build skills for school and life success in all children and the adults who care for them. The mission of the DCRC is to promote social and emotional development, foster resilience, and build skills for school and life success in all children and the adults who care for them. © 2010 Devereux Center for Resilient Children 4

5 Section 1: The Context Resilience Theory © 2010 Devereux Center for Resilient Children 5

6 What is Resilience? Resilience means the personal and community qualities that enable us to rebound from adversity, trauma, tragedy, threats, or other stresses - and to go on with life with a sense of mastery, competence, and hope. New Freedom Commission,

7 © 2010 Devereux Center for Resilient Children Use of word Resilience 7

8 Established Recovery and Resilience as the mental health goals for the United States © 2010 Devereux Center for Resilient Children Established Recovery and Resilience as the mental health goals for the US 8

9 The Context (continued) The Context (continued) Social & Emotional Learning © 2010 Devereux Center for Resilient Children 9

10 The Collaborative for Academic, Social and Emotional Learning Based at the University of Illinois – Chicago Based at the University of Illinois – Chicago Research and public policy advocates for Social and Emotional Learning or SEL Research and public policy advocates for Social and Emotional Learning or SEL Recent Meta-analyses of the research literature Recent Meta-analyses of the research literature © 2010 Devereux Center for Resilient Children 10

11 © 2010 Devereux Center for Resilient Children 11

12 © 2010 Devereux Center for Resilient Children 12

13 CASEL (continued) CASEL Framework – 5 key social- emotional skills for school and life success CASEL Framework – 5 key social- emotional skills for school and life success Primary basis of the DESSA scales Primary basis of the DESSA scales CASEL Framework is being incorporated into state and local educational standards CASEL Framework is being incorporated into state and local educational standards CASEL taking a leadership role in writing common core SEL standards CASEL taking a leadership role in writing common core SEL standards © 2010 Devereux Center for Resilient Children 13

14 Federal SEL Legislation HR 4223 – The Academic, Social and Emotional Learning Act. HR 4223 – The Academic, Social and Emotional Learning Act. Establish a National Technical Assistance and Training Center for SEL Establish a National Technical Assistance and Training Center for SEL Provide grants to support evidence-based SEL programs Provide grants to support evidence-based SEL programs Conduct a national evaluation of SEL programs Conduct a national evaluation of SEL programs © 2010 Devereux Center for Resilient Children 14

15 SEL Standards Established Illinois Illinois Ohio Ohio New York New York Washington State Washington State New Jersey (proposed) New Jersey (proposed) Pennsylvania (in committee) Pennsylvania (in committee) Kansas* Kansas* Oklahoma* Oklahoma* Tennessee* Tennessee* Vermont Anchorage, AK Vermont Anchorage, AK British Columbia British Columbia 15

16 Does Resilience Matter? Results of a predictive validity study… Results of a predictive validity study… 16

17 The Context (continued) The Context (continued) NASP NASP Integrated and Comprehensive School Psychological Services Model © 2010 Devereux Center for Resilient Children 17

18 NASPs Integrated and Comprehensive School Psychological Services Model (SPR, 2010, 39, (2), ) Identifies 10 domains that, provide a general framework of basic competencies effective strategies and skills..to help (all) students success academically, socially, behaviorally and emotionally. All school psychologists are expected to possess at least a basic level of competency in all of the 10 domains 18

19 NASPs Integrated and Comprehensive School Psychological Services Model (cont) Data-Based Decision Making and Accountability School psychologists have knowledge of varied models and methods of assessment and data collection methods for identifying strengths and needs.. School psychologists use valid and reliable assessment techniques 19

20 NASPs Integrated and Comprehensive School Psychological Services Model (cont) Interventions and Mental Health Services to Develop Social and Life Skills School psychologists have knowledge of…evidence-based strategies to promote social-emotional functioning and mental health Use assessment and data-collection methods.. that support socialization, learning and mental health. 20

21 NASPs Integrated and Comprehensive School Psychological Services Model (cont) Preventive and Responsive Services School psychologists have knowledge of principles and research related to resilience and risk factors in learning and mental health.. School psychologists promote recognition of risk and protective factors School psychologists promote wellness and resilience 21

22 MEB Disorders 20 – 25% of school-aged children 20 – 25% of school-aged children Number is growing Number is growing 247 Billion dollars per year 247 Billion dollars per year Hardship for students, parents and schools Hardship for students, parents and schools 22

23 What if we could quickly, efficiently and accurately identify those children at risk of developing MEB disorders and intervene before they begin to exhibit the problem behaviors? 23

24 The Devereux Comprehensive System © 2010 Devereux Center for Resilient Children 24

25 The Goal Strength-based assessment of behaviors related to social and emotional well-being Strength-based assessment of behaviors related to social and emotional well-being Simple, practical, and easy to use Simple, practical, and easy to use Meet or exceed professional standards Meet or exceed professional standards Provide teachers and mental health professionals with tools not found in other assessments Provide teachers and mental health professionals with tools not found in other assessments Lead to interventions Lead to interventions Useful in documenting outcomes Useful in documenting outcomes © 2010 Devereux Center for Resilient Children 25

26 The DESSA Comprehensive System Universal screening with an 8-item, strength- based behavior rating scale, the DESSA-mini Universal screening with an 8-item, strength- based behavior rating scale, the DESSA-mini Provide a snapshot of the overall social-emotional competence of your students Provide a snapshot of the overall social-emotional competence of your students Support universal strategies Support universal strategies Follow-up assessment with at-risk students with the DESSA Follow-up assessment with at-risk students with the DESSA Support targeted strategies Support targeted strategies Periodic progress monitoring with the DESSA- mini and Ongoing Progress Monitoring Form. Periodic progress monitoring with the DESSA- mini and Ongoing Progress Monitoring Form. © 2010 Devereux Center for Resilient Children 26

27 Universal Screening with the DESSA-mini © 2010 Devereux Center for Resilient Children 27

28 Prevention and the School Psychologist There is a movement in School Psychology toward prevention of academic failure There is a movement in School Psychology toward prevention of academic failure In order to prevent academic problems universal screening is indicated In order to prevent academic problems universal screening is indicated In the past, tests of achievement were given In the past, tests of achievement were given Today, some have proposed using short one minute reading fluency tests, for example, as a way to identify children who are having trouble reading Today, some have proposed using short one minute reading fluency tests, for example, as a way to identify children who are having trouble reading 28

29 Prevention and the School Psychologist Similarly, is a movement in School Psychology toward prevention of mental health problems … Similarly, is a movement in School Psychology toward prevention of mental health problems … Universal screening is one way to prevent academic problems Universal screening is one way to prevent academic problems Preventing mental health problems requires screening for those factors that help protect children from developing mental health issues Preventing mental health problems requires screening for those factors that help protect children from developing mental health issues This is an important role for school psychologists This is an important role for school psychologists 29

30 Prevention and the School Psychologist NASPs mission is to … enhance the mental health and educational competence of all children. NASPs mission is to … enhance the mental health and educational competence of all children. Ensuring the mental health of students is a key role of school psychology Ensuring the mental health of students is a key role of school psychology How can school psychologists assess potential mental health problems? How can school psychologists assess potential mental health problems? 30

31 Prevention and the School Psychologist School psychologists may… School psychologists may… evaluate mental health status of children when they are referred for an evaluation evaluate mental health status of children when they are referred for an evaluation By the time children with behavioral and emotional problems become noticed by the school psychologist the emotional issues the drive the problem behaviors may be firmly entranced By the time children with behavioral and emotional problems become noticed by the school psychologist the emotional issues the drive the problem behaviors may be firmly entranced Mental health problems need to detected as early as possible Mental health problems need to detected as early as possible 31

32 Mental Health Screening According to the US Department of Health and Human Services (1999) about 20% of school aged children have behavioral, social-emotional, and mental health disorders According to the US Department of Health and Human Services (1999) about 20% of school aged children have behavioral, social-emotional, and mental health disorders Universal screening to identify children at risk of developing mental health problems is needed Universal screening to identify children at risk of developing mental health problems is needed 32

33 Mental Health Screening School personnel can conduct universal screening to help identify these children at risk of mental health problems School personnel can conduct universal screening to help identify these children at risk of mental health problems Screening results should help assess the level of resilience for each teachers class Screening results should help assess the level of resilience for each teachers class Screening tests results could be used to determine if interventions that teach protective factors should be applied Screening tests results could be used to determine if interventions that teach protective factors should be applied Universal screening should be brief to complete and have evidence of reliability and predictive validity Universal screening should be brief to complete and have evidence of reliability and predictive validity 33

34 Mental Health Screening One way to screen for potential mental health problems is to evaluate childrens protective factors One way to screen for potential mental health problems is to evaluate childrens protective factors Protective factors are those variables that lead to resilient outcomes (e.g., good mental health) Protective factors are those variables that lead to resilient outcomes (e.g., good mental health) Protective factors lead to more positive behavioral and psychological outcomes as well as improved academic performance Protective factors lead to more positive behavioral and psychological outcomes as well as improved academic performance Protective factors help children be resilient Protective factors help children be resilient 34

35 Mental Health Screening Protective factors can be measured with the DESSA mini Protective factors can be measured with the DESSA mini This is an 8-item rating inventory for school-aged children This is an 8-item rating inventory for school-aged children It is a very brief, but effective, tool It is a very brief, but effective, tool Several 8-item versions are in development Several 8-item versions are in development The scale can be completed in less than one minute The scale can be completed in less than one minute The scale is effective The scale is effective 35

36 DESSA – mini (Naglieri, LeBuffe & Shapiro, 2010) A brief measure of social-emotional competencies comprised of four separate forms that can be used for universal screening and ongoing progress monitoring 36

37 The DESSA-mini The DESSA-mini allows for: The DESSA-mini allows for: Universal screening Universal screening Repeated assessment Repeated assessment Determination of need for instruction Determination of need for instruction Four equivalent 8-item forms Four equivalent 8-item forms Completed in 1-2 minutes by teachers Completed in 1-2 minutes by teachers Yields one score – Social-Emotional Total Score Yields one score – Social-Emotional Total Score © 2010 Devereux Center for Resilient Children 37

38 Four Forms of DESSA- mini 38

39 Four Forms of DESSA- mini 39

40 Four Forms of DESSA- mini 36 8 Need

41 DESSA-mini Scores One Score – Social Emotional Total (SET) One Score – Social Emotional Total (SET) T Scores T Scores Mean of 50, SD of 10 Mean of 50, SD of 10 Percentiles Percentiles Descriptive Terms for Score Ranges Descriptive Terms for Score Ranges > 60 = Strength ( 16%) > 60 = Strength ( 16%) = Typical ( 68%) = Typical ( 68%) < 40 = Need for Instruction (16%) < 40 = Need for Instruction (16%) © 2010 Devereux Center for Resilient Children 41

42 DESSA mini DESSA mini normative group DESSA mini normative group Standardization data for Teacher Raters (N = 1,249) Standardization data for Teacher Raters (N = 1,249) Region: NE = 24.6%; South = 39.1%; Midwest = 22.3%; West = 14.0% Region: NE = 24.6%; South = 39.1%; Midwest = 22.3%; West = 14.0% 50.8% Males 50.8% Males Grades Kindergarten through 8 Grades Kindergarten through 8 42

43 DESSA-mini Psychometrics 43

44 DESSA-mini Psychometrics © 2010 Devereux Center for Resilient Children 44

45 DESSA-mini Psychometrics Reliability and SEM Reliability and SEM © 2010 Devereux Center for Resilient Children 45

46 DESSA-mini Psychometrics Reliability and SEM Reliability and SEM © 2010 Devereux Center for Resilient Children 46

47 DESSA-mini Psychometrics Reliability and SEM Reliability and SEM © 2010 Devereux Center for Resilient Children 47

48 DESSA-mini Psychometrics © 2010 Devereux Center for Resilient Children 48

49 DESSA-mini Research Manuscript to appear in Psychology in the Schools (2011) Manuscript to appear in Psychology in the Schools (2011) We studied the percentage of agreements between mini and full DESSA We studied the percentage of agreements between mini and full DESSA 49

50 DESSA-mini Research Overall category agreement is excellent Overall category agreement is excellent Table 5. DESSA and Each DESSA-mini Means, SDs, and ns for Grades K - 8. Dessa- Mini N n of Agreements % Agreements Mini 11,2221, % Mini 21,2221, % Mini 3 1,2221, % Mini 4 1,2221, % 50

51 False negatives have scores 40 on Total True Positives have scores >40 on the mini and >40 on the Total True Negatives have scores <40 on Total and mini False Positives have scores >40 on mini but <40 on Total 51

52 DESSA-mini Psychometrics Use ongoing progress monitoring Use ongoing progress monitoring How do we describe changes over time? How do we describe changes over time? These children have a score of 32 52

53 Monitoring Progress with the DESSA-mini OPM 53

54 © 2010 Devereux Center for Resilient Children Ongoing Progress Monitoring Form 54

55 Poor Response to Instruction 55

56 Poor Response to Instruction 56

57 © 2010 Devereux Center for Resilient Children 57

58 © 2010 Devereux Center for Resilient Children 58

59 © 2010 Devereux Center for Resilient Children 59

60 © 2010 Devereux Center for Resilient Children 60

61 Response to Instruction 61

62 Conclusions Universal screening of factors that predict resilience can be efficiently conducted Universal screening of factors that predict resilience can be efficiently conducted School psychologists should take on this important mental health screening role School psychologists should take on this important mental health screening role Once evaluated, teachers and school psychologists should work together to deliver a curriculum that improves protective factors and maximize resilience Once evaluated, teachers and school psychologists should work together to deliver a curriculum that improves protective factors and maximize resilience 62

63 Assessment & Planning for Intervention with the DESSA © 2010 Devereux Center for Resilient Children 63

64 The Devereux Student Strengths Assessment Based on resilience theory & SEL principles Based on resilience theory & SEL principles 72 items 72 items 8 scales 8 scales Completed by parents, teachers, and/or after-school / community program staff Completed by parents, teachers, and/or after-school / community program staff Takes 15 minutes to complete Takes 15 minutes to complete On-line administration, scoring and reporting available On-line administration, scoring and reporting available © 2010 Devereux Center for Resilient Children 64

65 Purposes of the DESSA Identify social-emotional strengths and needs of elementary and middle school children. Identify social-emotional strengths and needs of elementary and middle school children. Tier I - Produce classroom profiles that guide universal prevention strategies. Tier I - Produce classroom profiles that guide universal prevention strategies. Tier II - Identify at-risk children so that targeted interventions can occur. Tier II - Identify at-risk children so that targeted interventions can occur. Tier III - For special education students, identify important strengths that can be incorporated into IEPs. Tier III - For special education students, identify important strengths that can be incorporated into IEPs. © 2010 Devereux Center for Resilient Children 65

66 Additional Purposes of the DESSA Foster collaboration between parents and teachers Foster collaboration between parents and teachers Document outcomes for individual students, classrooms, and communities Document outcomes for individual students, classrooms, and communities Serve as a research measure Serve as a research measure © 2010 Devereux Center for Resilient Children 66

67 Development of the DESSA Review of the literature – 765 items Review of the literature – 765 items National Pilot Study – 156 items National Pilot Study – 156 items Eliminate those with item-total r of <.60 Eliminate those with item-total r of <.60 Eliminate those with a d-ratio of <.50 Eliminate those with a d-ratio of <.50 Eliminate those that were N/A Eliminate those that were N/A Standardization Form – 81 items Standardization Form – 81 items Eliminate age trends Eliminate age trends DESSA Final Form – 72 items DESSA Final Form – 72 items © 2010 Devereux Center for Resilient Children 67

68 Standardization 2,500 children, grades K-8 2,500 children, grades K-8 All 50 states included in sample All 50 states included in sample Representative of US Population Representative of US Population © 2010 Devereux Center for Resilient Children 68

69 DESSA Scale Structure Social Emotional Composite Social Emotional Composite Eight Scales Eight Scales Self Awareness Self Awareness Self-Management Self-Management Social-Awareness Social-Awareness Relationship Skills Relationship Skills Goal-Directed Behavior Goal-Directed Behavior Personal Responsibility Personal Responsibility Decision Making Decision Making Optimistic Thinking Optimistic Thinking © 2010 Devereux Center for Resilient Children 69

70 Administration of the DESSA © 2010 Devereux Center for Resilient Children 70

71 DESSA Raters Raters provide the ratings Raters provide the ratings Teachers, After School Staff Teachers, After School Staff Parents Parents Read English at about the 6 th grade level Read English at about the 6 th grade level Sufficient opportunity to observe the child Sufficient opportunity to observe the child What about raters who have literacy issues or are ELLs? What about raters who have literacy issues or are ELLs? © 2010 Devereux Center for Resilient Children 71

72 DESSA Users Users score and interpret the ratings and use the results to improve outcomes for the child Users score and interpret the ratings and use the results to improve outcomes for the child Level E instrument Level E instrument © 2010 Devereux Center for Resilient Children 72

73 DESSA Results T Scores T Scores Mean of 50, SD of 10 Mean of 50, SD of 10 Percentiles Percentiles Descriptive Terms for Score Ranges Descriptive Terms for Score Ranges > 60 = Strength > 60 = Strength = Typical = Typical < 40 = Need for Instruction < 40 = Need for Instruction Individual Profile Individual Profile Classroom Profile Classroom Profile © 2010 Devereux Center for Resilient Children 73

74 DESSA Rating Form 74

75 Individual Student Profile © 2010 Devereux Center for Resilient Children 75

76 © 2010 Devereux Center for Resilient Children 76

77 Reliability - Internal Consistency © 2010 Devereux Center for Resilient Children 77

78 Interpreting the DESSA © 2010 Devereux Center for Resilient Children 78

79 Interpreting the DESSA Three Step Process Three Step Process Social-Emotional Composite Social-Emotional Composite 8 Individual Scale Scores 8 Individual Scale Scores Individual Item Analysis Individual Item Analysis © 2010 Devereux Center for Resilient Children 79

80 Case Study Charles Charles 11 year old / 5 th Grade 11 year old / 5 th Grade Special education student (EBD) Special education student (EBD) Placement in RTF since age 7 Placement in RTF since age 7 Born into foster care, adopted at age 2.5 Born into foster care, adopted at age 2.5 History of serious behavioral concerns History of serious behavioral concerns (see handout – Charles Scoring Assistant Report) © 2010 Devereux Center for Resilient Children 80

81 Charles – Step 1 Social-Emotional Composite Social-Emotional Composite T-score = 51 T-score = 51 Percentile = 54 Percentile = 54 Typical Typical © 2010 Devereux Center for Resilient Children 81

82 Charles' Individual Student Profile © 2010 Devereux Center for Resilient Children 82

83 Charles– Step 2 Individual Scale Scores Individual Scale Scores Strength Range Strength Range Goal-Director Behavior: T= 61Goal-Director Behavior: T= 61 Need for Instruction Need for Instruction Decision Making: T= 39Decision Making: T= 39 © 2010 Devereux Center for Resilient Children 83

84 Charles– Step 3 Individual Item Analysis Individual Item Analysis Need to provide a linkage between Need to provide a linkage between assessment and intervention assessment and intervention © 2010 Devereux Center for Resilient Children 84

85 DESSA Item Analysis DESSA Item Analysis Significant Item Score - Strength Nonsignificant Item Score - Typical #18 – ask to take on additional work or responsibilities ? Never RarelyOccasionallyFrequently Very Frequently #37 – follow the example of a positive role model? Significant Item Score - Need Never RarelyOccasionallyFrequently Very Frequently #69 – use available resources (people or objects) to solve a problem? Never RarelyOccasionallyFrequently Very Frequently © 2010 Devereux Center for Resilient Children 85

86 DCRC Approach to Intervention Strengths, Goals and Strategies Strengths, Goals and Strategies Step 1 – identify goal(s) of most concern to stakeholders Step 1 – identify goal(s) of most concern to stakeholders Step 2 – identify relevant strengths that can be leveraged Step 2 – identify relevant strengths that can be leveraged Step 3 – identify strategy Step 3 – identify strategy Critical – communicate by beginning with strengths! Critical – communicate by beginning with strengths! 86

87 Utilizing the DESSA to Guide Intervention Assessment only has value if it leads to an improved outcome for the child (NAEYC) Assessment only has value if it leads to an improved outcome for the child (NAEYC) Many good existing curricula Many good existing curricula SAMHSA SAMHSA CASEL CASEL Committee for Children Committee for Children Short-Term well provide crosswalks Short-Term well provide crosswalks Long-Term well provide DESSA-guided strategies Long-Term well provide DESSA-guided strategies © 2010 Devereux Center for Resilient Children 87

88 Advanced Interpretation Rater Comparisons Rater Comparisons Two teachers, two parents, parent-teacher Two teachers, two parents, parent-teacher Based on the standard error of the difference Based on the standard error of the difference Scale level agreement or disagreement Scale level agreement or disagreement Strong basis for collaboration Strong basis for collaboration Supports planning across environments Supports planning across environments © 2010 Devereux Center for Resilient Children 88

89 Rater Differences 89

90 Rater Comparisons /10/07 10/18/ Mrs. E. Mrs Smith (See Handout #2: DESSA Record Form) © 2010 Devereux Center for Resilient Children 90

91 Advanced Interpretation Pretest-Posttest Comparisons Pretest-Posttest Comparisons Multiple comparisons overtime Multiple comparisons overtime Based on the standard error of prediction Based on the standard error of prediction Demonstrates statistically reliable change Demonstrates statistically reliable change Evaluation of the effectiveness of strategies Evaluation of the effectiveness of strategies © 2010 Devereux Center for Resilient Children 91

92 Pretest-Posttest Comparisons Mary Smith 10/10/07 02/28/ X X X X 69 X X X X X (See Handout #2: DESSA Record Form) © 2010 Devereux Center for Resilient Children 92

93 The DESSA Comprehensive System Summary 93

94 Ongoing Progress Monitoring Form 94

95 Ongoing Progress Monitoring Form 95

96 Time 1 DESSA-min 40? Yes NO Student Receives Universal (Tier 1) Instruction Student receives full DESSA Student reassessed With DESSA mini or if indicated DESSA 40? NO Yes Results reviewed with School Counselor. Plan for Targeted (Tier 2) Supports Developed Implement Targeted Strategies, monitor with RTI approach (See page 2) © 2010 Devereux Center for Resilient Children 96

97 Time 3 Time 2 1)Increase frequency & intensity of Tier 2 supports. 2)Implement individualized strategies 3)Consult with SAP NO Implement Universal Supports DESSA-mini 40? DESSA-mini for all students, excepts Tier 2 Ongoing Monitoring for Students at Tier 2 (Targeted Instruction) YES* Student receives full DESSA to evaluate outcome at the individual scale level © 2010 Devereux Center for Resilient Children 97

98 Utilization of the DESSA Comprehensive System with a Tiered Approach Tier I - Primary Prevention Tier I - Primary Prevention Universal Use of the DESSA Universal Use of the DESSA Classroom Profile Classroom Profile Identifies common areas of strength and concernIdentifies common areas of strength and concern Leads to classroom-wide strategiesLeads to classroom-wide strategies Tier II - Secondary Prevention Tier II - Secondary Prevention Identification of children at-risk due to low PFs Identification of children at-risk due to low PFs Individual Child Profile Individual Child Profile Targeted Strategies Targeted Strategies © 2010 Devereux Center for Resilient Children 98

99 Utilization of the DESSA (cont.) Tier III - Tertiary Prevention Tier III - Tertiary Prevention Identification of strengths and needs in identified children Identification of strengths and needs in identified children Incorporated into IEPs Incorporated into IEPs Strong basis for collaboration with parents Strong basis for collaboration with parents Program Evaluation Program Evaluation Evaluate progress at the scale, child, and classroom level Evaluate progress at the scale, child, and classroom level Basis for quality improvement and continuing education efforts Basis for quality improvement and continuing education efforts © 2010 Devereux Center for Resilient Children 99

100 Ways the DESSA adds Value Assess competencies related to academic achievement Assess competencies related to academic achievement Support implementation of SEL and similar programs Support implementation of SEL and similar programs More specific implementation More specific implementation Outcome determination Outcome determination Meet requirements to do meaningful strength-based assessment Meet requirements to do meaningful strength-based assessment 100

101 Can Change Teacher Perceptions I have one student who has a lot of trouble being bossy …and I am frustrated with her a lot. But the DESSA showed me all the areas she is strong in, and gave me some ideas for channeling some of her difficult behaviors to utilize her strengths. I have one student who has a lot of trouble being bossy …and I am frustrated with her a lot. But the DESSA showed me all the areas she is strong in, and gave me some ideas for channeling some of her difficult behaviors to utilize her strengths. Being that my students are in a self-contained special ed. Classroom,... I was surprised that several of my students are "typical" in more areas than I would have thought. This allowed me to write strength statements and share good news with the parents. Being that my students are in a self-contained special ed. Classroom,... I was surprised that several of my students are "typical" in more areas than I would have thought. This allowed me to write strength statements and share good news with the parents. One of my students is very compassionate. He has very strong S.A. skills. Cool. One of my students is very compassionate. He has very strong S.A. skills. Cool. Direct quotes from teachers in Anchorage, Alaska SD 101

102 Can Change the Students Perception I had a couple kids who don't say nice things about themselves. However, they are wonderful in all other areas. I made a point of letting both of these children know how great I think they are. They both were very happy with that. I had a couple kids who don't say nice things about themselves. However, they are wonderful in all other areas. I made a point of letting both of these children know how great I think they are. They both were very happy with that. Direct quote from teacher in Anchorage, Alaska SD 102

103 Can Contribute to Teacher Satisfaction I really liked this experience. It was not too laborious and had very worthwhile results. I would tell everyone to make the time and do this. I really liked this experience. It was not too laborious and had very worthwhile results. I would tell everyone to make the time and do this. Using an assessment tells teachers it's time to start paying close attention to the social skills. It helps teachers awareness but it also gives teachers a way to address these behaviors that is proactive! Many times we're only reacting to students (often negatively or with much frustration) but we aren't doing enough to help them. Using an assessment tells teachers it's time to start paying close attention to the social skills. It helps teachers awareness but it also gives teachers a way to address these behaviors that is proactive! Many times we're only reacting to students (often negatively or with much frustration) but we aren't doing enough to help them. I liked how it made me see my students, and it really took my teaching with SEL in a new direction I liked how it made me see my students, and it really took my teaching with SEL in a new direction Direct quotes from teachers in Anchorage, Alaska SD 103

104 Essential to Prevention Chemung County NY Chemung County NY 406 preschool children 406 preschool children Pre-Post design with no intervention Pre-Post design with no intervention Results Results N = 406 % PreBC Concern %PostBC Concern Strength on Pretest Total Protective Factors (n = 76) 0%0% Typical on Pretest Total Protective Factors (n = 275) 14%13% Concern on Pretest Total Protective Factors (n = 55) 51%70% 104

105 Thank You! Contact Information: Paul LeBuffe Co-Director Devereux Center for Resilient Children (DESSA) © 2010 Devereux Center for Resilient Children 105

106 106

107 Family of Protective Factor Assessments DECA for Infants and Toddlers (0 to 3 years old) DECA for Preschoolers (2 through 5 years old) DECA-C (Clinical) for Preschoolers (2 through 5 years old) DESSA (Kindergarten-8 th Grade) DESSA – Mini ! (Kindergarten-8 th Grade) © 2010 Devereux Center for Resilient Children 107

108 About After-School Programs (ASP) In 2004, 6.5 million children (K-12) participated in ASP nationwide. In 2004, 6.5 million children (K-12) participated in ASP nationwide. ASP aims to provide safe and supervised environments for children during after-school hours (3pm-6pm). ASP aims to provide safe and supervised environments for children during after-school hours (3pm-6pm). National accreditation standards for ASPs include SEL. National accreditation standards for ASPs include SEL. The Obama Administration intends to double the funding for ASPs. The Obama Administration intends to double the funding for ASPs. Including measures to maximize performance and effectiveness across grantees nationwide. Including measures to maximize performance and effectiveness across grantees nationwide. Will support an additional 1 million children Will support an additional 1 million children © 2010 Devereux Center for Resilient Children 108

109 Definition of Strength-based Assessment The measurement of emotional and behavioral skills and characteristics that The measurement of emotional and behavioral skills and characteristics that create a sense of accomplishment create a sense of accomplishment contribute to satisfying relationships with others contribute to satisfying relationships with others improve ones ability to cope with stress improve ones ability to cope with stress promote social and academic development promote social and academic development Epstein & Sharma (1998) 109

110 What Strength-based Assessment is Not Simply asking What are your strengths? Simply asking What are your strengths? Writing a 5-page report with one sentence describing interests or hobbies Writing a 5-page report with one sentence describing interests or hobbies Informal, impressionistic approaches, such as examination of refrigerator doors Informal, impressionistic approaches, such as examination of refrigerator doors Ignoring or minimizing problems or pathology Ignoring or minimizing problems or pathology 110

111 Advantages of Strength-Based Approaches Leads to Prevention Leads to Prevention Expands Definition of Health Expands Definition of Health Teaches Replacement Behaviors Teaches Replacement Behaviors Attractive to Stakeholders Attractive to Stakeholders Teachers more confident Teachers more confident Parents less defensive Parents less defensive Better basis for collaboration Better basis for collaboration © 2010 Devereux Center for Resilient Children 111


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