Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Model of Comprehensive and Integrated School Psychological Services (NASP, 2010) National Association of School Psychologists 4340 East West Highway,

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Model of Comprehensive and Integrated School Psychological Services (NASP, 2010) National Association of School Psychologists 4340 East West Highway,"— Presentation transcript:

1

2 Model of Comprehensive and Integrated School Psychological Services (NASP, 2010) National Association of School Psychologists 4340 East West Highway, Suite 402 Bethesda, Maryland Phone: Website:

3 Model of Comprehensive and Integrated School Psychological Services (NASP, 2010)

4 3 Standards for School Psychology Revised and Adopted Standards for Graduate Preparation of School Psychologists Standards for the Credentialing of School Psychologists Principles for Professional Ethics Model for Comprehensive and Integrated School Psychological Services 3

5 4 Standards for School Psychology NASP mission as a context for standards: »The mission of the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) is to represent school psychology and support school psychologists to enhance the learning and mental health of all children and youth. 4

6 5 Standards Documents Provide a unified set of national principles that guide graduate education, credentialing, professional practice and services, and ethical behavior of effective school psychologists Intended to: »define contemporary school psychology »promote school psychological services for children, families and schools »provide a foundation for the future of school psychology 5

7 6 Standards Documents, continued Used to communicate NASPs positions and advocate for qualifications and practices of school psychologists with stakeholders, policy makers, and other professional groups at the national, state, and local levels. 6

8 7 Impact of NASP Standards NASP has promoted standards for over 30 years. These standards have transformed the profession and are the backbone of preparation and practice. Most states use these standards for credentialing and licensure purposes. Many school districts use these standards as the basis for SP performance evaluations. Currently: »182 training programs are NASP Approved »31 states accept the NCSP »11,629 school psychologists hold the NCSP 7

9 8 The Practice Model is designed to promote the connection between our training, standards and our actual practice. 8

10 9 Why We Need a Practice Model It provides a more organized and coherent framework to advocate for and communicate about school psychological services, particularly with school administrators and policymakers It provides a concrete tool for advocating for roles and job preservation It promotes consistency of practice by delineating what services might reasonably be expected to be available from school psychologists It provides direction for excellence in delivery of services 9

11 10 Model for Comprehensive and Integrated SP Services: Components Two major sections: Professional Practices – aligned with 10 domains of practice that are the core components of the model Organizational Principles – intended to be utilized by organizations that employ school psychologists 10

12 11

13 12 Professional Practices that Permeate all Aspects of Service Delivery Data-based decision making and accountability Knowledge of varied models and methods of assessment and data collection for identifying strengths and needs, developing effective services and programs, and measuring progress and outcomes. 12 Examples: Use problem solving frameworks Collect and review student progress data Analyze school improvement data Evaluate treatment fidelity Valid & Reliable Assessments

14 13 Professional Practices That Permeate All Aspects of Service Delivery Consultation and collaboration Knowledge of varied models and strategies for consultation, collaboration, and communication applicable to individuals, families, groups, and systems, and methods to promote effective implementation of services. 13 Examples: Consult & collaborate with families, teachers, etc. Coordinate with community providers Work to advocate for needed change

15 14 Direct and Indirect Services for Children, Families and Schools Student-Level Services Interventions and instructional support to develop academic skills knowledge of biological, cultural, and social influences on academic skills; learning, cognitive, and developmental processes; and evidence-based curricula and instructional strategies 14 Examples Implement evidenced based interventions to improve student engagement and learning Promote the use of instructional strategies for diverse learners Use data to assess student gains

16 15 Direct and Indirect Services for Children, Families and Schools Student-Level Services Interventions and mental health services to develop social and life skills knowledge of biological, cultural, and social influences on behavior and mental health; behavioral and emotional impacts on learning and life skills; and evidence-based strategies to promote social-emotional functioning and mental health 15 Examples Implement evidenced based interventions to improve individual student social, emotional, and behavioral wellness Monitor fidelity of implementation Screen for & identify warning signs

17 16 Direct and Indirect Services for Children, Families and Schools Systems-Level Services School-wide practices to promote learning knowledge of school and systems structure, organization, and theory; general and special education; technology resources; and evidence-based school practices that promote learning and mental health 16 Examples Implement school-wide prevention and promotion programs Advocate for policies and practices that promote positive school environments

18 17 Direct and Indirect Services for Children, Families and Schools Systems-Level Services Preventive and responsive services knowledge of principles and research related to resilience and risk factors in learning and mental health; services in schools and communities to support multi- tiered prevention, and evidence-based strategies for effective crisis response 17 Examples: Participate in school crisis prevention and response teams Evaluate and engage in activities that alleviate risk and promote resilience

19 18 Direct and Indirect Services for Children, Families and Schools System Level Services Family-school collaboration services knowledge of principles and research related to family systems, strengths, needs, and culture; evidence-based strategies to support family influences on childrens learning and mental health; and strategies to develop collaboration between families and schools 18 Examples: Reach out and engage parents Promote respect and appropriate services for cultural and linguistic differences

20 19 Foundations of School Psychological Service Delivery Diversity in development and learning knowledge of individual differences, abilities, disabilities, and other diverse characteristics; principles and research related to diversity factors for children, families, and schools, including factors related to culture, context, and individual and role differences; and evidence-based strategies to enhance services and address potential influences related to diversity 19 Examples: Provide culturally competent and responsive services Promote fairness and social justice in school policies and programs

21 20 Foundations of School Psychological Service Delivery Research and program evaluation knowledge of research design, statistics, measurement, varied data collection and analysis techniques, and program evaluation sufficient for understanding research and interpreting data in applied settings 20 Examples: Gather data about the impact of services on student performance Assist in program evaluation Assist teachers in collecting meaningful student data

22 21 Foundations of School Psychological Service Delivery Legal, ethical, and professional practice knowledge of the history and foundations of school psychology; multiple service models and methods; ethical, legal, and professional standards; and other factors related to professional identity and effective practice as school psychologists 21 Examples: Remain knowledgeable about legal issues Comply with regulatory expectations Engage in professional development Use supervision & mentoring

23 22 Organizational Principles Outlines the organizational conditions that must be met in order to ensure effective delivery of school psychological services for children, families, and schools. 22

24 23 Organizational Principles This section provides organizational recommendations to school districts pertaining to the delivery of school psychological services. Areas include: 1.Organization of Services 2.Working Climate 3.Physical, personnel, and fiscal support systems 4.Professional Communication 5.Supervision and mentoring 6.Professional development and recognition systems 23

25 24 Key Issues Addressed Development and sustainability of comprehensive and coordinated school psychological services Levels and types of supports and resources needed Importance of attending to retention and recruitment Communication and interpersonal respect Professional development Mentoring and Performance Appraisal

26 25 School Psychology Ratio Organizational Principle 3.2 …. Generally, the ratio should not exceed one school psychologist for every 1000 students. When school psychologists are providing comprehensive and preventive services (i.e., evaluations, consultation, individual/group counseling, crisis response, behavioral interventions, etc), this ratio should not exceed one school psychologist for every 500 to 700 students in order to ensure quality of student outcomes. Similarly, when school psychologists are assigned to work primarily with student populations that have particularly intensive special needs (e.g., students with significant emotional or behavioral disorders, or students with autism spectrum disorders), this school psychologist to student ratio should be even lower. 25

27 26 How does the Practice Model connect with Blueprint III? The NASP Model for Comprehensive and Integrated School Psychological Services is the official model for practice adopted by our delegate assembly. All previous standards revisions and Blueprints 1-3 all helped inform this model. Blueprint 3 was a blueprint but not the final product. It was never formally adopted. Many of the conceptual ideas and components of Blueprint 3 are integrated into the Practice Model.

28 27 NASP Practice Model Resources NASP is building a resource page for individuals and states to assist in the adoption of the practice model. When completed, resources will include: »Practice model brochure »Adaptable presentations »Self assessment Tool »Advocacy and marketing tools & tips for state association leadership and individuals »Reference materials »Related professional development materials

29 28 This slide presentation may be adapted by the user to reflect specifics in your district/schools. Content or best practice information may not be changed without approval from NASP. The NASP logo and any specific author credits must remain. State and local school psychology associations may add their logo and contact information to the presentation. This slide may be removed before giving a presentation. ©2010, National Association of School Psychologists, 4340 East West Highway, Suite 402, Bethesda, MD, 20814, (301)

30


Download ppt "Model of Comprehensive and Integrated School Psychological Services (NASP, 2010) National Association of School Psychologists 4340 East West Highway,"

Similar presentations


Ads by Google