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Instructions for PowerPoint This slide show is intended to be used by school psychologists and can be adapted for different audiences. School psychologists.

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Presentation on theme: "Instructions for PowerPoint This slide show is intended to be used by school psychologists and can be adapted for different audiences. School psychologists."— Presentation transcript:

1 Instructions for PowerPoint This slide show is intended to be used by school psychologists and can be adapted for different audiences. School psychologists may wish to make changes to the slide show making it more appropriate for the target audience. For example, if the audience is parents or administrators, teacher or school can be replaced with parent or administrator. Feel free to change the Powerpoint in any way that does not alter the information but adapts to your audience. The resources section at the end should be reviewed and only resources that are pertinent to the target audience should be presented. Some of the resources are available for the general pubic and some are only available for download by NASP members. Once downloaded the resources can be shared as appropriate. Before presenting the slide show, review the notes at the bottom of some slides. This will provide you with additional talking points. You can print the notes off before your presentation by selecting file –PRINT and under Print what? Select note pages. DELETE THIS SLIDE BEFORE SHOWING SLIDE SHOW

2 Resilience: Strategies for Parents and Educators Presented by: YOUR NAME, TITLE © 2005 National Association of School Psychologists, www.nasponline.org

3 What is Resilience?

4 Resilience Resilience is the ability to become personally and professionally successful despite severe adversity Resilience is a normal trait that comes from inborn tendencies to adapt Resilience can be fostered in the right environment Paine (2002)

5 Resilience Developmental assets contribute to resilience: –External: positive experiences from people and organizations in the environment (support, empowerment, use of time, boundaries/expectations) –Internal: internalized qualities that shape judgment and choices (positive values, identity, commitment to learning, social competencies) Paine (2002)

6 Resilience Research indicates that students with a high number of developmental assets are less likely to engage in risk behaviors and more likely to succeed in school and maintain good health. Paine (2002)

7 The Importance of Resilience Represents the ability to deal with lifes challenges in a positive and productive manner Plays a central role in a persons recovery after exposure to trauma or adversity Critical to understanding a persons reaction to trauma or adversity

8 The Importance of Resilience Resilience is essential to success in school and life Adults can help children become more resilient Fostering resilience in children improves school and personal outcomes and reduces risk behaviors

9 Adversity Family problems, school problems, health issues, poverty, violence, peer rejection, and crises are all examples of types of adversity that can undermine a childs mental health and interfere with learning.

10 Possible Risks for Children Facing Adversity Academic failure Social maladjustment Health problems Poverty Mental illness Substance abuse Law enforcement involvement

11 Promoting Resilience There are strategies that adults who work with children can use to promote resilience Each strategy can be adapted to the environment in which it is used (school, home, church, neighborhood)

12 Promoting Resilience Be loving and supportive Foster positive attitudes Nurture positive emotions

13 Promoting Resilience Reinforce emotional intelligence Develop their competence Promote positive social connections

14 Promoting Resilience Provide consistent and clear expectations Encourage helping others Teach peace-building skills

15 Promoting Resilience Reduce stress Ensure healthy habits Provide medical care Good prenatal care encourages resilience

16 Building Resilience in Schools: System-Wide Create schools and classrooms that promote: –Connectedness –Security –Personal Value –Competency Incorporate resilience skill building into the school curriculum and teacher strategies

17 Building Resilience as School Psychologists Provide direct service to students at-risk. –Incorporate resilience skill building into every student contact Help design and implement school-wide resilience skill building programs Educate parents and staff on their role in building resilience in children

18 Resilience Supports in Our School INSERT SPECIFICS FOR YOUR SCHOOL(S) HERE

19 To contact your school psychologist [ADD NAME and CONTACT INFORMATION HERE]

20 NASP Online Resources for Parents V. S. Harvey (2007). Schoolwide Methods for Fostering Resiliency. Promoting Resiliency in Your Child. Adapted from V. S. Harvey (2003). Resiliency: Strategies for Parents and Educators in Helping Children and Home and School II: Information for Parents and Educators. Bethesda, MD: National Association of School Psychologists. www.nasponline.org/communications

21 NASP Online Resources for Parents Building Resiliency: Helping Children Learn to Weather Tough Times. Adapted from V. S. Harvey (2003). Resiliency: Strategies for Parents and Educators in Helping Children and Home and School II: Information for Parents and Educators. Bethesda, MD: National Association of School Psychologists. V. S. Harvey (2005). Fostering Resilience: A Handout for Teachers and Parents. NASP Communiqué`, 34(3). www.nasponline.org/communications

22 NASP Online Resources for Members Book Chapter: –Paine s. & Paine C.K. (2002). Promoting Safety and Success in School by Developing Students Strengths. In M.R. Shinn, H. W. Walker, & G Stoner (Eds.), Interventions for Academic and Behavior Problems II: Preventative and Remedial Approaches, (pp. 89-112). Bethesda, MD: National Association of School Psychologists. www.nasponline.org/communications

23 NASP Online Resources for Members Research Articles: –Harrington, P. L. (Ed.). (1998). Resilience Applied: The Promise and Pitfalls of School-Based Resilience Programs. School Psychology Review, 27(3). –Smith J. & Cochrane, W. S. (2006). Interventions to Enhance Resilience for Children At Risk for Disruptive Behavior Disorders. NASP Communiqué`, 35 (4). www.nasponline.org/communications

24 NASP Online Resources for Members Crisis Response Handout: –Identifying Seriously Traumatized Children: Tips for Parents and Educators. NASP Resources: Crisis Resource: Trauma. –Managing Strong Emotional Reactions to Traumatic Events: Tips for Parents and Teachers. NASP Resources> Crisis>Trauma. www.nasponline.org/communications

25 NASP Online Resources for Members PowerPoint Presentation: –Resilience: Strategies for Parents and Educators. www.nasponline.org/communications

26 NASP Online Resources for Members Goldstein, S. & Brooks, R. (2005). Defining a Clinical Psychology of Resilience. NASP Communiqué 33(5). R. B. Armistead, K.C. Cowan (2005, November). Resilience. NASP Communiqué: Communication Matters, 34(3). www.nasponline.org/communications

27 Other NASP Resources Book Chapters: –McNamara, K. (2002). Best Practice in Promotion of Social Competence in Schools. In A. Thomas & J. Grimes (Eds.), Best Practices in School Psychology IV (pp. 911-928). –Brock, S. E. (2002). Identifying Individuals at Risk for Psychological Trauma. In A. Thomas & J. Grimes (Eds.), Best Practices in School Crisis Prevention and Intervention (pp.367-384). Bethesda, MD: National Association of School Psychologists. www.nasponline.org/communications

28 Other NASP Resources Brock, S.E., Lazarus, P.J., & Jimerson, S.R.(2002). Creating Nurturing Classroom Environments, chapter from Best Practices in School Crisis Prevention and Intervention. NASP Publication www.nasponline.org/communications

29 Other NASP Resources Doll, B., Zucker, S., & Brehm, K. (2004). Resilient Classrooms: Creating Healthy Environments for Learning (Practical Intervention in the Schools). New York: Guilford Press


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