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Hutongs in Beijing By: Savannah Cotten. What are Hutongs ? Hutongs are narrow streets or alleys most commonly associated with Beijing. Hutongs are narrow.

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Presentation on theme: "Hutongs in Beijing By: Savannah Cotten. What are Hutongs ? Hutongs are narrow streets or alleys most commonly associated with Beijing. Hutongs are narrow."— Presentation transcript:

1 Hutongs in Beijing By: Savannah Cotten

2 What are Hutongs ? Hutongs are narrow streets or alleys most commonly associated with Beijing. Hutongs are narrow streets or alleys most commonly associated with Beijing.

3 How are Hutongs formed? They are formed by lines of siheyuan ( traditional courtyard residences) They are formed by lines of siheyuan ( traditional courtyard residences) Many neighborhoods were formed by joining one siheyuan to another to form a hutong, and then join one hutong to another. Many neighborhoods were formed by joining one siheyuan to another to form a hutong, and then join one hutong to another.

4 Hutongs in History A hutong was also once used as the lowest level of administrative geographical divisions within a city in ancient China A hutong was also once used as the lowest level of administrative geographical divisions within a city in ancient China However, as the ancient Chinese urban administration division system gave way to population and household divisions instead of geographical divisions, the hutongs were no longer used as the lowest level of administrative geographical division and were replaced with other divisional approaches However, as the ancient Chinese urban administration division system gave way to population and household divisions instead of geographical divisions, the hutongs were no longer used as the lowest level of administrative geographical division and were replaced with other divisional approaches

5 Definition The original Mongolian word was hottog, meaning " water well." In other words, it means a place where people live, because people always gather where there is water. The original Mongolian word was hottog, meaning " water well." In other words, it means a place where people live, because people always gather where there is water.

6 Turn of the 20 th Century Many new hutongs, built sloppily and with no apparent plan, began to appear on the outskirts of the old city, while the old ones lost their former neat appearance. The social stratification of the residents also began to evaporate, reflecting the collapse of the feudal system Many new hutongs, built sloppily and with no apparent plan, began to appear on the outskirts of the old city, while the old ones lost their former neat appearance. The social stratification of the residents also began to evaporate, reflecting the collapse of the feudal system

7 During the Republic of China Conditions of hutongs worsened, siheyuans previously owned and occupied by single families were subdivided and shared by many households, with additions tacked on as needed, built with whatever materials were available Conditions of hutongs worsened, siheyuans previously owned and occupied by single families were subdivided and shared by many households, with additions tacked on as needed, built with whatever materials were available The 978 hutongs listed in Qing Dynasty records swelled to 1,330 by The 978 hutongs listed in Qing Dynasty records swelled to 1,330 by 1949.

8 Decline of Hutongs following the founding of the Peoples Republic of China in 1949, many of the old hutongs disappeared, replaced by the high rises and wide boulevards of todays Beijing. following the founding of the Peoples Republic of China in 1949, many of the old hutongs disappeared, replaced by the high rises and wide boulevards of todays Beijing.

9 Culture The hutongs are residential neighborhoods which still form the heart of Old Beijing The hutongs are residential neighborhoods which still form the heart of Old Beijing In contrast to the court life and elite culture represented by the Forbidden City, Summer Palace, and the Temple of Heaven, the hutongs reflect the culture of grassroots Beijingers In contrast to the court life and elite culture represented by the Forbidden City, Summer Palace, and the Temple of Heaven, the hutongs reflect the culture of grassroots Beijingers

10 What do you see? Walking through the hutongs, it is common to see groups of elderly citizens sitting together playing cards, mahjong or Chinese chess. In the early mornings and evenings, they gather to practice traditional forms of exercise such as taijiquan as well as to dance and sing folk songs or Peking Opera arias. Walking through the hutongs, it is common to see groups of elderly citizens sitting together playing cards, mahjong or Chinese chess. In the early mornings and evenings, they gather to practice traditional forms of exercise such as taijiquan as well as to dance and sing folk songs or Peking Opera arias.

11 Today some hutongs have been designated as protected areas in an attempt to preserve this aspect of Chinese cultural history some hutongs have been designated as protected areas in an attempt to preserve this aspect of Chinese cultural history

12 Fun Fact Each hutong has a name. Some have had only one name since their creation, while others have had several throughout their history. Names were given to hutongs for various reasons Each hutong has a name. Some have had only one name since their creation, while others have had several throughout their history. Names were given to hutongs for various reasons Some names include: Some names include: Plants, such as Liushu Hutong ( Liushu means willow) Plants, such as Liushu Hutong ( Liushu means willow) Words with positive attributes, such as Xiqing Hutong ( Xiqing means happy) Words with positive attributes, such as Xiqing Hutong ( Xiqing means happy) Markets and businesses, such as Yangshi Hutong ( Yangshi is a sheep market) Markets and businesses, such as Yangshi Hutong ( Yangshi is a sheep market)

13 Pictures of Hutongs


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