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Follow-up Reporting Expectations Part II MSCHE 2009 Annual Conference Mary Ellen Petrisko.

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Presentation on theme: "Follow-up Reporting Expectations Part II MSCHE 2009 Annual Conference Mary Ellen Petrisko."— Presentation transcript:

1 Follow-up Reporting Expectations Part II MSCHE 2009 Annual Conference Mary Ellen Petrisko

2 Monitoring Reports …when the institution meets the Commissions standards …, but the Commission has concerns about ongoing compliance with one or more standards. …when the institution meets the Commissions standards …, but the Commission has concerns about ongoing compliance with one or more standards. …when the Commission places the institution on warning or probation because of a lack of evidence that the institution is in compliance with one or more standards. …when the Commission places the institution on warning or probation because of a lack of evidence that the institution is in compliance with one or more standards. --Guidelines: Follow-Up Reports and Visits (Draft) --Guidelines: Follow-Up Reports and Visits (Draft)

3 Supplemental Reports The Commission postpones an accreditation decision and requests a supplemental report when it has insufficient information to substantiate…compliance with one or more accreditation standards. The Commission postpones an accreditation decision and requests a supplemental report when it has insufficient information to substantiate…compliance with one or more accreditation standards. Intended only to allow institution to provide further information, not to give the institution time to formulate plans or initiate remedial action Intended only to allow institution to provide further information, not to give the institution time to formulate plans or initiate remedial action Short-time line Short-time line

4 Length of monitoring and supplemental reports No length prescribed No length prescribed Previous guidelines said to limit monitoring reports to 25 pages, supplemental reports to 15 Previous guidelines said to limit monitoring reports to 25 pages, supplemental reports to 15 Relatively short reports with well- organized appendices generally the best approach Relatively short reports with well- organized appendices generally the best approach Length should be proportionate to number and complexity of issues addressed Length should be proportionate to number and complexity of issues addressed

5 Report organization and format As for progress reports As for progress reports Title page Title page Introduction Introduction Progress to date and current status Progress to date and current status Appendices of supporting documentation Appendices of supporting documentation Conclusion Conclusion

6 Submittal of reports Same as for progress reports Same as for progress reports If paper, four copies bound ONLY by staples or clamps (NO binders or folders) If paper, four copies bound ONLY by staples or clamps (NO binders or folders) –Send to Evaluation Services Office at the Commission If electronic: send as attachments to or If electronic: send as attachments to or

7 Preparing an effective report READ AND UNDERSTAND THE COMMISSIONS ACTION READ AND UNDERSTAND THE COMMISSIONS ACTION Understand the Commissions underlying concerns and expectations Understand the Commissions underlying concerns and expectations –Read the relevant standard(s) and their fundamental elements in Characteristics of Excellence in Higher Education –Review all reports considered by Commission when it took its action

8 Preparing an effective report, contd Address everything that is required Address everything that is required –Write the report so that it clearly addresses the issues specified in the action –Dont make the readers search for requested information Focus on past and present, not intentions or pledges for the future Focus on past and present, not intentions or pledges for the future –No Im a gonnas

9 Preparing an effective report, contd Focus on outcomes Focus on outcomes Provide documented evidence Provide documented evidence Be forthright and honest Be forthright and honest Be concise and well organized Be concise and well organized –Respect the readers time and energy: unnecessarily voluminous reports may frustrate and confuse the reader –Avoid data dumps and exclude irrelevant information and documentation

10 Preparing an effective report, contd Make the report easy to follow Make the report easy to follow –If report is extensive, begin with outline of contents –Use subheadings, charts, bulleted text as appropriate –Clearly label supporting documents and provide clear references to them in text Submit the report on time Submit the report on time –Commission may consider an institution to have voluntarily allowed its accreditation to lapse if its report is not submitted on time

11 Follow-up visits Commission Liaison Guidance visits Commission Liaison Guidance visits –To provide additional information so that institution fully understands Commissions concerns –Typically conducted by vice president –Discussion of standards and expectations –Schedule varies according to issues at hand –NOT accreditation reviews; no Commission action other than to note visit

12 Follow-up visits continued Small team visit Small team visit –May be directed after monitoring report or supplemental report –Required after monitoring report if institution is on warning or probation –Liaison identifies peer evaluators for team Number, backgrounds, expertise vary according to issues in report Number, backgrounds, expertise vary according to issues in report –Liaison ordinarily accompanies team as resource

13 Scheduling of small team visits Typically last one or two days Typically last one or two days At least one week after report due date At least one week after report due date Early enough to allow for completion of team report, institutional response and chairs confidential brief at least two weeks prior to Committee on Follow-up Activities Early enough to allow for completion of team report, institutional response and chairs confidential brief at least two weeks prior to Committee on Follow-up Activities Liaison works with team chair and president on schedule for report submission Liaison works with team chair and president on schedule for report submission

14 Commission review and actions Follow-up report (and if team visited, the team report, institutional response, and chairs confidential brief) is considered by the Committee on Follow-up Activities (composed of Commissioners) Follow-up report (and if team visited, the team report, institutional response, and chairs confidential brief) is considered by the Committee on Follow-up Activities (composed of Commissioners) Reviewed by Commissioner reader and liaison Reviewed by Commissioner reader and liaison Recommendation for action is forwarded to Commission (March, June and November meetings) Recommendation for action is forwarded to Commission (March, June and November meetings) Commission action is communicated to president, included in Statement of Accreditation Status Commission action is communicated to president, included in Statement of Accreditation Status


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