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Applying for Financial Aid

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Presentation on theme: "Applying for Financial Aid"— Presentation transcript:

1 Applying for Financial Aid 2009-2010
Thank you for coming to our California Cash for College workshop. Today, we will be discussing how to apply for financial aid. 1

2 Sponsored by: Presented by:
This session is sponsored by__________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________. Today’s event is also made possible through the cooperation of the wonderful staff here at _______________ (location). My name is___________________and I am from____________________ College/University/Agency. Joining me today are my colleagues___________________________________ _______________________________________________________ from_______________________________. (Introduce all volunteers). 2 2

3 What Will You Learn Today?
Types and sources of financial aid Required financial aid application forms How to complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and the Cal Grant GPA Verification Form Answers to your individual questions At today’s workshop, we will discuss: -the types and sources of financial aid -the financial aid application forms you will need to complete -tips for completing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid - often called the FAFSA -and the Cal Grant GPA Verification Form. Finally, we will provide you with an opportunity to get individual help in completing your FAFSA. Each of you should have two forms for use later in this session: - the on-line Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA on the Web Worksheet) and - the Cal Grant GPA Verification Form If you do not have copies of these forms, please raise your hand so we can get them to you. NOTE TO PRESENTERS: If you decide not to cover the financial aid overview information contained in Slides 4-13, be sure to hide these slides and adjust the text of this slide (#3) to delete the reference to “Types and Sources of Financial Aid.” 3

4 Types of Financial Aid Gift Aid - Grants or scholarships that do not need to be repaid Work - Money earned by the student as payment for a job on or off campus Loans - Borrowed money to be paid back, usually with interest There are three major types of financial aid – grants and scholarships, work-study, and educational loans. Grants and scholarships are gift aid that is not required to be repaid. Grants are usually based on the student’s financial need. Scholarships are generally based on talent and/or merit. While there are a number of grants and scholarships available to California students, the Cal Grant program is one of the most important and valuable. Cal Grants are an example of gift aid based on need and merit. We will discuss Cal Grants in more detail later in the presentation. Work-Study programs provide opportunities for students to earn money to help pay for school expenses. Both parents and students can borrow from a variety of low interest loan programs designed to help with the educational expenses of the student. Student loans do not require repayment until the student is no longer in school. Parent loans may require payment while the student is still in school. 4

5 Sources of Financial Aid
Federal government State government Colleges and universities Private agencies, companies, foundations, and your parents’ employers By completing the financial aid applications and any other documents required by the colleges and universities to which you are applying, you may be considered for funds from: - the federal government - the state government - colleges and universities themselves Private agencies, companies, foundations, and maybe even your parents’ employers provide scholarships for college, even though these sources provide only about 6% of the total financial aid awarded to students. Check with each of the private agencies, companies, and foundations to which you wish to apply about their application forms and deadlines. Web sites such as are good resources for such scholarships. 5

6 Cal Grants Cal Grant A Entitlement Awards – for high school seniors and recent high school grads with a Grade Point Average (GPA) of at least 3.0, family income and assets below the state ceilings, who demonstrate financial need Cal Grant B Entitlement Awards – for high school seniors and recent high school grads with a GPA of at least 2.0, who come from disadvantaged or low income families, whose family income and assets are below the state ceilings, and who demonstrate financial need Cal Grant C Awards - for students from low income families pursuing vocational programs of study Let’s talk about Cal Grants – an important source of grant funds provided by the state of California for California students. Students attending California colleges or universities may be eligible to receive one of the following Cal Grants. High school Grade Point Average (usually referred to as the GPA) is an important eligibility criterion for these grants. The Cal Grant GPA is calculated using grades from sophomore and junior years of high school and any summer grades after each of those years. Please note: for purposes of the Cal Grant A and B Entitlement Awards, a “recent high school graduate” is defined as a student who is applying for a Cal Grant within 18 months of high school graduation. Cal Grant A - To be eligible, students need a minimum 3.0 GPA and must demonstrate financial need of $1,500 at the college they plan to attend. Their families must also have income and assets that are lower than the state-established ceilings. This grant currently covers system-wide fees at the California State University and University of California campuses and up to $9,708 of tuition and fees at independent California colleges and universities. The grant is renewable for three additional years. Cal Grant B - This grant is for students who have a minimum 2.0 GPA (that is, a C average), financial need of at least $700, and who come from very low-income families. Students must also meet the other criteria mentioned already. This grant provides a small grant of about $1,551 per year for up to four years to help with living expenses at all schools. In addition, the grant covers system-wide fees at California public 4-year institutions and up to $9,708 of tuition and fees at independent 4-year California schools. In most cases, the tuition and fee portion of the Cal Grant B is available to students in their 2nd through 4th years only. Cal Grant C - This grant is for students from low income families attending occupational or vocational schools including community college programs of less than 24 months in length. The Cal Grant C is renewable for one additional year.

7 Eligibility for Cal Grants
To be eligible for a Cal Grant, the student must also: be a U.S. citizen or eligible noncitizen be a California resident attend an accredited California college or university in at least half-time To be eligible for a Cal Grant, the student must also: be a U.S. citizen or eligible noncitizen as defined in the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). We’ll talk more about what this means later in the session. be a California resident attend an accredited California college or university at least half-time. 7

8 Residency and Cal Grant Eligibility for 2009-2010
If unmarried and under 18 years of age, the student will be considered a legal resident of California if: parents have been legal residents of California for one year immediately prior to March 2, 2009, or student has lived in California with other legal California residents, other than parents, for two years immediately prior to March 2, 2009, or parents in the Armed Forces are stationed in California on active duty at the time the student enrolls in college, or parents’ military home of record is California. Here is a brief overview of the residency requirements for the Cal Grants. NOTE: Presenters should review slide with participants as appropriate based on audience. Many presenters may choose to hide this slide since it is technical in nature and use it for reference only. If married or 18 years of age or older, the student establishes his/her own residence status. The student must be a legal resident of California for one year prior to March 2, 2009. 8

9 2009-2010 Cal Grant Application Requirements
By March 2, 2009, complete and submit: Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) Cal Grant GPA Verification Form The California Student Aid Commission (CSAC) requires that both the Free Application for Federal Student Aid and the Cal Grant GPA Verification Form be submitted by March 2, 2009, in order for a student to be considered for a Cal Grant. The GPA Verification Form must be completed by the student, certified by the student’s high school, and sent directly to CSAC. Some high schools submit student grade point averages directly to CSAC on behalf of their students. Others require that students complete the student section of the Cal Grant GPA Verification Form. (The student section of the form asks simple information such as name, address, and Social Security Number). If the paper form is required, it is important to submit it as soon as possible to the high school counselor or registrar because it may take a few days to certify the student’s grade point average. You can download a Cal Grant GPA Verification Form at: The GPA Verification Form must be postmarked no later than March 2, 2009. Check with your high school Counseling Office/Guidance Center to see if you need to submit the paper Cal Grant GPA Verification Form or if your high school will submit the GPA electronically on your behalf. If your school submits the Cal Grant GPA Verification Form electronically, you may have to authorize the release of your Social Security Number. We urge you to file these forms as soon as possible. Don’t wait for the March 2nd deadline and miss out on a valuable grant that, like other grants, does not have to be repaid. Check with your high school or college counselor for more details on how to file the Cal Grant GPA Verification Form 9

10 California Chafee Grant
The California Chafee Grant program provides up to $5,000 annually to current and former foster youth for college or vocational training at any accredited college in the U.S based on available funding To be eligible, foster youth must have been in California foster care on their 16th birthday and not have reached their 22nd birthday before July 1, 2009 To apply, the foster youth must complete: FAFSA California Chafee Grant Program Application If you are a foster youth, the California Chafee Grant may provide some additional financial aid for college in addition to a Cal Grant. If you are the foster parent or know a foster youth, tell him/her about this special program. The California Chafee Grant program provides up to $5,000 annually to current and former foster youth for college or vocational training at any accredited college in the U.S. The continued availability of this grant is dependent on available funding. To be eligible, foster youth must have been in California foster care on their 16th birthday and may not have reached their 22nd birthday before July 1, 2009. To apply, the foster youth must complete: FAFSA California Chafee Grant Program Application To learn more about the Chafee Grant, go to To learn more about the Chafee Grant, go to: 10

11 Need-Based Grants Federal Grants Pell Grants
$ 4,731 maximum per year Academic Competitiveness Grants $750 for the first year $1,300 for the second year Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (SEOG) $4,000 maximum per year In addition to the funding the State of California provides to students, the federal government also provides grants to needy students. The Federal Pell Grants currently range from $400 to $4,731. Full and part-time students may be eligible based on the information they and their families provide on the FAFSA. Students who are eligible for Federal Pell Grants may also qualify for an Academic Competitiveness Grants (ACG) if they are U.S. citizens or permanent residents, are enrolled at least half-time, have completed a rigorous secondary school program of study and are in their first or second year of college in If the student will be a first-year student in , he or she must have completed secondary school after January 1, A first year award is $750. Students in their second year of college must have completed secondary school after January 1, 2005, and have a 3.0 college grade point average. A second year award is $1,300. Some very needy students may also be awarded the Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants, often referred to as the FSEOG. The colleges or universities the students attend may provide an FSEOG award that ranges from $200 to $4,000 annually. These funds are limited and not all needy students receive this grant. 11

12 Need-Based Grants Community College Board of Governors’ (BOG) Fee Waiver Waives the California Community Colleges’ enrollment fee for financially needy California residents To learn more about this BOG Fee Waiver, go to CSU State University Grant (SUG) – amounts vary UC Grant – amounts vary Independent College Grants - amounts vary The colleges and universities themselves may also award grants to needy students from their own funds to be used to help pay for the costs of going to college. Examples of these grants are: - The Community College Board of Governors’ Fee Waiver Program, often referred to as the BOG. The enrollment fees for needy students eligible for the BOG may be waived through this program. To learn more about this important California Community College program, please go to: - The California State University may award grants to eligible, needy students through the State University Grant program, referred to as the SUG. - The University of California may also provide grant funds to its eligible, needy students as do independent or private colleges and universities. The grants awarded by the CSU’s and the UC’s, as well as those awarded by the independent colleges and universities, vary based on student financial need. 12

13 Institutional Scholarship and/or
Types of Applications FAFSA Cal Grant GPA Verification Form Other applications or forms as required by the college such as CSS Financial Aid PROFILE There are a number of important financial aid forms: -The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) is required by all colleges and universities for the awarding of federal and state aid. Everyone should complete the FAFSA. In some instances, a school may use the FAFSA for institutional aid as well. This form must be completed by students and their families either in electronic format (FAFSA on the Web) or through the paper FAFSA. We will discuss the FAFSA on the Web in greater detail in just a few minutes. -As previously mentioned, in order to be considered for a Cal Grant, students must also complete the Cal Grant GPA Verification Form. This form must be certified by their high school, and submitted to the California Student Aid Commission (CSAC), by March 2, 2009. -The CSS Financial Aid PROFILE is used by many private or independent colleges and universities to determine eligibility for their own funds. -Some colleges or universities may require their own scholarship or financial aid applications in addition to the FAFSA. The additional forms may collect information not requested on the FAFSA (such as medical and dental expenses and special family circumstances). These forms help the institution award its own funds. These forms must be returned to the college or university directly. -As noted earlier, many employers, organizations, and community-based agencies offering scholarships require students to complete separate applications. -Many colleges will request copies of student and parent 2008 federal tax returns and other income documentation. We suggest you and your parents complete your 2008 federal income tax forms as soon as possible. Make sure you keep copies of these forms. -Also be sure to submit any required applications or requested documents by the published deadlines. At many institutions, failure to meet a deadline may jeopardize student eligibility for grants and other types of aid. We cannot emphasize this enough – don’t miss out by missing a deadline. Institutional Scholarship and/or Financial Aid Application 2008 federal tax returns (along with schedules and W-2s) or other income documentation 13 13

14 FAFSA Information & Tips
File early, but no later than March 2, 2009 Use estimated 2008 income information if taxes are not complete at time of FAFSA submission Student and at least one parent whose information is reported must complete and sign the FAFSA It is important to submit the FAFSA as early as possible after January 1, 2009, but no later than March 2, 2009, to be considered for a Cal Grant. Remember, families should report estimated 2008 student and parent income information if their 2008 federal income tax forms have not been completed at the time the FAFSA is submitted. There will be plenty of time to make corrections at a later date. The student and at least one parent whose information is reported on the FAFSA must complete and sign the FAFSA. 14

15 Apply for student and parent PINs TODAY at:
Federal PIN PIN (Personal Identification Number) serves as the electronic signature on ED documents Both student and at least one parent need PINs to sign the FAFSA electronically May be used to: Check on FAFSA status Verify and correct FAFSA data Add additional schools to receive FAFSA data Change home and addresses If an address is provided, PIN will be ed to the PIN applicant within hours Apply for student and parent PINs TODAY at: The PIN (or personal identification number) serves as an electronic signature on U.S. Department of Education documents, including the FAFSA. The PIN works like the special number you might have for an ATM card. It identifies the students and/or parents as those authorized to file an electronic FAFSA. To apply for a PIN, the student and at least one custodial parent whose information is required on the FAFSA should visit the PIN website at After the student and parent provide name, Social Security numbers and other information, the U.S. Department of Education will either - the student and parent PINs within hours (if addresses for each are provided) or - Mail the PIN(s) to the student and his or her parent within two weeks if no addresses have been provided. 15

16 Getting Ready Before starting the FAFSA, gather:
Student driver’s license Student Alien Registration Card Student and Parent Social Security cards 2008 W-2 Forms and other records of money earned 2008 federal income tax form (even if not completed) Records of untaxed income Current bank statements Business, farm, and other real estate records Records of stocks, bonds, and other investments Create a file for copies of all financial aid documents submitted Here is a list of records families should have available in order to complete the FAFSA. Filling out the FAFSA will be easier and less time-consuming if the student and the family gather these records before going on-line or starting the paper form. Keep in mind that not all families will have all of these records. The student will need : -Student driver’s license (if the student has one), and -Student Alien Registration Card (if the student is an eligible non-citizen) Student and parents will need: - Social Security cards - W-2 forms and other records of any money earned in 2008 federal income tax returns (if completed). Remember, 2008 federal tax returns do not need to be completed to apply for student financial aid. It is more important to submit the FAFSA and other aid applications by the published deadlines using estimated data than to wait until 2008 student and parent tax returns are actually completed. - Records of 2008 untaxed income - Current bank and real estate records - Records of any stocks, bonds, and other investments For future reference, be sure to keep copies of all financial aid documents used to complete the FAFSA, and a copy of the completed FAFSA. Students must reapply each year for financial aid. 16

17 The FOTW Worksheet A Five Section Form
Section 1 – is about the student Section 2 – determines student dependency status Section 3 – collects parental information for dependent students Section 4 – collects student finances and information about the independent student Section 5 – allows students to list up to ten schools to receive information from the FAFSA Today, we will talk about the FAFSA on the Web. The FAFSA on the Web Worksheet – referred to as the FOTW Worksheet - is in booklet format. General instructions are on page 1, the FOTW Worksheet is on pages 2 through 7, and the 2008 Additional Financial Information and 2008 Untaxed Income sheets are on page 8. Sections shaded gray are for students to complete and those shaded purple are for parents. Important contact information can be found in the instructions. Deadline dates are shown for state aid and an explanation of the type of deadline - date received, date postmarked, date processed, etc. States requiring additional forms are marked with an asterisk. For instance, the State of California requires the Cal Grant GPA Verification form. The FOTW consists of the following 5 Sections: Section 1 - asks for information about the student--The words “you” and “your” refer to the student applicant Section 2 - determines whether the student’s parents must provide financial data on the FAFSA Section 3 – collects data about parents’ 2008 taxed and untaxed income and assets, as well as information about the parents’ household Section 4 – collects data about the student’s 2008 taxed and untaxed income and assets, as well as information about the independent student’s household Section 5 - allows the student to have FAFSA data sent to up to ten colleges or universities It is important to note that the FOTW Worksheet does not include every question you will find on the actual FAFSA on the Web site. But it will give you a very good start. We will note some of the questions that are not on the Worksheet as we go through the presentation. 17

18 Section 1 (page 2) STUDENT INFORMATION
Section 1 collects information about the student. The question numbers on the FAFSA on the Web Worksheet are not in numerical order, so follow along with the text of the questions. The question numbers in parentheses that follow each question refer to the order in which the question will be found on the paper FAFSA. We will not cover every question on the FOTW or the paper FAFSA – just those that often confuse some students and their parents. 18

19 Section 1 Your Last Name Jones The FOTW will ask for the student’s first and last name as well as a middle initial Make sure to report the student’s name exactly as it appears on the student’s Social Security Card Your Last Name: It is important to list the student’s name exactly as it is listed on the student’s Social Security card. The FAFSA on the WEB website will ask for the student’s first name and middle initial as well. For example: report Susan M. Jones, not Suzie Jones, if Susan Marie is shown on the Social Security card as the first and middle names. 19

20 Section 1 Your Social Security Number
Double check your Social Security Number when entering it on the FOTW. Both your name and Social Security Number will be compared through a database match. The Student’s Social Security Number: We encourage students to refer to a copy of their actual Social Security card to help ensure the correct number is reported. A common mistake made by parents is to write their own number or that of another sibling. -To apply for a Social Security Number (SSN) or to get a replacement Social Security card, contact the Social Security Administration (SSA) at (800) or go to their website at -Because the U.S. Department of Education conducts an electronic match of the student’s name and SSN with the Social Security Administration, it is important that both pieces of student data (name and SSN) match the Social Security card exactly. 20

21 Section 1 Citizenship Status
If U.S. citizen, status will be confirmed by Social Security match If eligible noncitizen, status will be confirmed by Department of Homeland Security (DHS) match. This includes: U.S. permanent residents with I-551 Conditional permanent residents with I-551C Eligible noncitizens with I-94 If neither a citizen or eligible noncitizen, you are ineligible for federal/state aid, but might still be eligible for institutional funds Citizenship Status. Students must be a U.S. citizen or an eligible noncitizen to receive federal student financial aid and Cal Grants. If students have recently become U.S. citizens, they should contact the Social Security Administration (SSA) to update their status. Otherwise, when the U.S. Department of Education matches data with SSA, the Agency may report that they are not citizens and may be considered ineligible to receive federal and state aid. For financial aid purposes, an eligible noncitizen is someone who meets one of the following criteria: -A U.S. permanent resident who has an Alien Registration Receipt Card (I-551) -A conditional permanent resident with a (I-551C), or -A noncitizen with a departure record (I-94) from the Department of Homeland Security showing any one of the following designations: “Refugee,” “Asylum Granted,” “Parolee,” or “Cuban-Haitian Entrant.” Despite not being eligible for federal or state aid, students who are ineligible because they are undocumented may be considered for other institutional aid by some colleges or universities, and, therefore, may wish to complete the FAFSA to apply for that aid. Students who fall into this category are encouraged to contact the schools to which they are applying for admission for additional information. 21

22 Alien Registration Number
Section 1 Alien Registration Number If eligible noncitizen, write in your eight- or nine-digit Alien Registration Number (ARN) Precede an eight digit ARN with a zero Copy of Permanent Registration Card might be requested by the financial aid office Alien Registration Number. If students indicate response B (eligible noncitizen), they should write in their 8 or 9 digit Alien Registration Number. Students should precede an 8-digit number with a zero. Students who list their Alien Registration Number may be asked by the colleges or universities to provide a copy of their Permanent Registration Card. Some recently naturalized citizens may also be asked to provide a copy of their Naturalization documents. It is legal to photocopy these documents for financial aid purposes. 22

23 Section 1 Citizenship Status
NOTE: if you are undocumented if you are applying to any California public college or university, check to see if you might be eligible for in-state tuition costs check with colleges and universities to see if institutional financial aid is available apply for all private scholarships for which you may be eligible watch for changes in federal and state laws regarding the eligibility of undocumented or under-documented students start inquiring in elementary, middle or high school to see if it is possible for younger students to become permanent residents If you are undocumented, you may qualify for in-state tuition costs through state law (AB 540). Download The College & Financial Aid Guide for AB 540 Undocumented Immigrant Students at: You should also apply for all private scholarships for which you may be eligible check with colleges and universities to see if institutional financial aid is available watch for changes in federal and state laws regarding the eligibility of undocumented or under-documented students If parents have younger children, they should start inquiring in elementary, middle or high school to see if it is possible for the students to become permanent residents. For more information, contact the Mexican American Legal Defense and Education Fund (MALDEF): call (213) For a list of scholarships for undocumented students, go to For more information and a list of scholarships, go to 23

24 Your State of Legal Residence
Section 1 Your State of Legal Residence CA Residency relates to your permanent home state if you are dependent, the state of legal residence is usually the state in which your custodial parents live State of legal residence is also used to determine eligibility for state grants in the need calculation to determine the appropriate allowance for state and other taxes paid by that state’s residents Your State of Legal Residence: Residency relates to the student’s permanent home state. If the student is dependent, the state of legal residence is usually the state in which the custodial parents live. States have varying criteria for determining whether or not the student is a resident for purposes of state financial aid, such as the Cal Grant. However, California considers the student to be a resident if he/she became a legal resident of the state prior to March 2, 2008. The state of legal residence is also used in the calculation of a student’s financial aid eligibility by determining the appropriate allowance for state and other taxes paid by that state's residents. 24 24

25 Section 1 Selective Service Registration
Male students who are 18 years of age or older must be registered with Selective Service to receive federal and state aid Answer “Register me” only if you are male, aged 18-25, and have not yet registered. You may also register by going to: The following groups of students should leave this question blank: female students male students who are not yet 18 as of the date the FAFSA is submitted, and male students who have already registered. Male students who are 18 years of age or older must be registered with Selective Service to receive federal and state aid. Some colleges and universities will also require that the student be registered to receive institutional funds. This information will be confirmed with Selective Service. A student should answer “Register me” only if he is: - male, - currently between the ages of (on the day the FAFSA is submitted) and - NOT YET REGISTERED and would like the U.S. Department of Education to register the student with Selective Service. If the student is male, but is 17 years of age or younger at the time the FAFSA is submitted, he should leave the question blank. The student must register with Selective Service when he turns 18. He can do this at the Selective Service Web site, If the student is unsure if he has registered, he may go to this same site to verify his registration status. 25

26 Section 1 Federal Student Aid Question
Answer “No” if you have never received federal student grants, federal student loans or federal work-study You should also answer “No” if you have never attended college. If you answer “No” to this question, skip question 23 This question asks the student whether he/she has ever received Federal Student Financial Aid for attendance in college. Answer “No” if the student has never received federal student grants, federal student loans or federal work-study. The student should also answer “No” if he or she has never attended college as a regular college student. That includes a student who attended college while still enrolled in high school. If the answer to this question is “No,” skip question 23 Students who answer “Yes” to this question should proceed to Question 23. 26

27 Section 1 Drug Conviction Question
Answer “Yes” if you have been convicted of possessing or selling illegal drugs while you were receiving federal student financial aid Answer “No” if: You have no drug-related convictions of any kind but simply received student financial aid while a college student Conviction was for alcohol or tobacco Conviction was removed from your record or occurred before age 18 (unless tried as an adult) If the student has been convicted of possessing or selling illegal drugs while enrolled in college and receiving federal student aid, he/she may still be eligible to receive federal, state, and college financial aid. In this case, the student should answer the question “Yes,” go to complete the Drug Question Worksheet, and submit it as instructed. The U.S. Department of Education will send the Worksheet to students who answer “yes” to this question but do not submit the Worksheet . 27 27

28 Section 1 Parents’ Educational Level
Indicate highest level of schooling completed by your biological or adoptive parents (for state award purposes only) Use birth parents or adoptive parents - not stepparents or foster parents This definition of parents is unique to these two questions These questions are used for state scholarship purposes and do not affect eligibility for federal student aid. In California, these answers are used to determine Cal Grant B eligibility by measuring a student’s disadvantaged background. Enter the highest grade level completed by the student’s father and mother. Father and mother in these questions mean birth or adoptive parents, not legal guardians, stepparents, or foster parents. Note that this definition of parents is unique to these two questions. In addition, some states and colleges use the answers to these questions to determine if the student is the first member of his or her family to attend college. This may make a difference in the type and amount of aid received because some schools offer additional aid to students who are the first in their family to go to college. NOTE TO PRESENTERS: Discuss the difference between “completed” versus “attended.” For example, if the mother completed an AA degree at a community college, she would mark “High school” because she has not completed a four-year college degree program. Also, if parents completed the equivalent of a bachelor’s degree or higher in a foreign country, they must mark “College or beyond.” 28

29 Section 1 Degree Objective
Indicate your most immediate degree or certificate objective for Degree Objective: The student should answer these questions for the school most likely to be attended and should indicate the student’s most immediate degree or certificate objective for Even if the student plans to seek an advanced degree (such as a law degree) at a later date, he/she should list his/her most immediate degree objective. As an example, if the student is planning to attend a community college for an Associate degree in history leading to a transfer degree, he/she would mark the 4th box. If the student is planning to attend a 4-year college in , mark “1st bachelor’s degree.” If the student is unsure of the type of school he/she will attend, mark the first box – “1st bachelor’s degree.” 29

30 If unsure, report “Full-time”
Section 1 Your Expected Enrollment Status at the Start of the Academic Year Report your enrollment plans for the college you are most likely to attend If unsure, report “Full-time” Expected Enrollment Status for the Academic Year: A financial aid administrator will look at the student’s expected enrollment status as a factor in determining costs and financial aid eligibility. If, at a later time, the student’s enrollment status changes, the college will adjust the aid award to reflect this change, depending on the timing of the change, how much aid is available, etc. If students are unsure of their anticipated enrollment status, they should mark “Full-time.” 30

31 Section 1 Work-Study and Student Loans
If you are interested in either work-study (student employment) or student loans, or both, mark the appropriate box Indicating interest does not obligate you to either work or borrow, nor will it cause you to lose grants and scholarships Answering “neither” may restrict some options for limited work-study or loan funds Student Loans and Work Study: If the student is interested in only “work-study,” mark the first box, “only student loans,” mark the second box, and if interested in “both work-study and student loans,” mark the third box. Marking the third box does not obligate the student either to borrow or work, nor will it cause the student to lose scholarships or grants. Some students mistakenly think that marking the first, second, or fourth box in this question will mean more grant aid. This is not true! What might happen is that students reduce their options to receive needed loans or work opportunities. If unsure, students should mark the third box – “both work-study and student loans.” Students may always decline work or loans at a later time. 31

32 Section 2 (page 3) STUDENT DEPENDENCY STATUS
The questions in Section 2 are used to determine whether the student is considered dependent (for FAFSA filing purposes). If the student is dependent, parent financial information must be provided on the form. Students must answer each of the thirteen questions in this section with a “yes” or “no” response. Let’s review each of these questions. 32

33 Section 2 Determination of Student Dependency Status 33
NOTE TO PRESENTERS: At this point, read questions in Section 2 individually. 33

34 Section 2 Determination of Student Dependency Status 34 34
NOTE TO PRESENTERS: At this point, read questions in this section individually. 34 34

35 Section 2 Determination of Student Dependency Status
If you answer “no” to all questions in this section, go to Section 3. For FAFSA filing purposes, you are considered a dependent student and are required to provide parental information If you answer “yes” to any question in this section, skip Section 3 and go to Section 4. You are considered an independent student for FAFSA filing purposes and are NOT required to provide parental information If you answer “no” to all of the questions in this section, you are considered a dependent student and your parents will be required to provide their information and they should go to Section 3. Only students who can answer “yes” to at least one of the questions listed will be considered independent. If you answer “yes” to any question in this section, you should skip Section 3. For FAFSA filing purposes, you are considered an independent student and will only be required to provide information about yourself (and your spouse, if married.) NOTE: If there are circumstances that you believe may make you independent, then you may request special consideration by submitting a letter of special circumstance directly to each financial aid office. Appeals are considered on a case-by-case and at the discretion of the individual colleges; not all appeals will be granted. For today’s purpose, we will assume that most of you are required to provide parental information in Section 3 and so we will move on to that section now. 35

36 Section 3 (page 4) PARENTAL INFORMATION
36

37 Section 3 Parental Information
See Page 4 of FAFSA on the Web Worksheet about who is considered a parent Biological or adoptive parent(s) Stepparent (regardless of any prenuptial agreements) Before starting this section, listen carefully to help determine who is considered a parent in this section. Let’s look at Page 4 of the FAFSA on the Web Worksheet. You and your parents must answer all the questions in Section 3 as of the date you complete and submit your FAFSA. NOTE TO PRESENTERS: Go to Page 4 of the worksheet and read directly from the text, starting with “Grandparents, foster parents, and . . .” If the biological or adoptive parents are both living and married to each other, answer the questions about both of them. If the parent is widowed or single (that is, never married), answer the questions about that parent. If the widowed or divorced parent is remarried as of the day the FAFSA is submitted, answer the questions about that parent and the person to whom the parent is married (the student’s stepparent). If the parents are divorced or separated, answer the questions about the parent the student lived with more during the past 12 months. If the student lived with both equally, submit financial data about the parent who provided the greater amount of support. If that parent is remarried, include stepparent information. Who is Considered a Parent? The term "parent" is not restricted to biological parents. There are instances (such as when a grandparent legally adopts the applicant) in which a person other than a biological parent is treated as a parent, and in these instances, the parental questions on the application must be answered, since they apply to such an individual (or individuals). An adoptive parent is treated in the same manner as a biological parent on the FAFSA. A stepparent is also treated in the same manner as a biological parent if the stepparent is married, as of the date of application, to the biological parent whose information will be reported on the FAFSA, or if the stepparent has legally adopted the student. There are no exceptions. Prenuptial agreements do not exempt the stepparent from providing required data on the FAFSA. The stepparent's income information for the entire base year, 2008, must be reported even if the parent and stepparent were not married until after the start of 2008, but were married prior to the date the FAFSA was submitted. . 37

38 Section 3 Parental Information
Do not provide information on: Foster parents If the student is in foster care, he/she is automatically considered an independent student Legal guardians or grandparents or other relatives The student must attempt to get biological parental information Colleges may use Professional Judgment to allow the student to file as independent A foster parent, legal guardian, a grandparent or other relative is not treated as a parent for purposes of filing a FAFSA unless that person has legally adopted the applicant. If you are a student in this situation, contact the Financial Aid Office at the college or university you are most likely to attend for assistance before you begin filling out the FAFSA. Again, students should not provide any financial information about foster parent(s) Because a foster child is automatically considered an independent student legal guardians Student must attempt to get biological parent information Colleges may consider using professional judgment to make the student independent in rare cases. 38

39 Section 3 Parental Information
If the answer to any question is zero or the question does not apply, enter 0: Report whole dollar figures: Recommendation: If your parents have not filed their 2008 federal tax return, use W-2 forms and/or other employment records to estimate total income , $ 1 2 $ 3 5 6 (no cents) , If the answer to any question in Section 3 is zero, or the question does not apply, the student should enter “0” as shown. Always report whole dollar figures (rounding up or down); ignore any cents. Remember, if the parents whose information is reported on the FAFSA have not yet completed their 2008 federal income tax forms, it is important that they use their best estimates possible of their total 2008 taxable and untaxed income. W-2’s, final 2008 paycheck stubs, or any other employment or income records may help parents to estimate. Remember, it is OK to use estimated 2008 income information when completing the FAFSA. Parents and students will have opportunities to update estimated income amounts when actual federal tax returns are filed or other documentation becomes available. 39

40 Section 3 Parents’ Marital Status as of Today
Parents’ Marital Status as of Today: Parents should indicate their marital status as of the day they are completing the FAFSA. Only a parent who was never married should use the “Single” response. Date of marriage, separation, divorce, or widowhood: Parents should indicate the date of their marital status as reported in Question 62. A parent who was never married should leave this question blank. Month and Year Your Parents were Married, Separated, Divorced, or Widowed M M Y Y Y Y 40

41 Section 3 Parent E-Mail Address
Fill in your parents’ address that will be valid at least until you start college If you provide your parents’ address, the FAFSA processor will let them know your FAFSA has been processed This optional question provides students the opportunity to report their parents’ address. (The address must be able to fit within the boxes shown on the application.) The address will be used by the U.S. Department of Education, the state, and the colleges listed on the FAFSA to: - correspond with parents - confirm FAFSA data If any of the characters entered for the address are unreadable, the address will be deleted so that confidential information will not be sent to a wrong address. It is important that this address remain valid through the admission and financial aid application period because many colleges and universities will use this address to communicate with your parents. AS A SIDE NOTE: Parents may want to consider opening a separate account to be used just for receiving information from the colleges and universities to which their children are applying. 41

42 Section 3 Father’s and Mother’s SSN, Last Name, and Dates of Birth
JONES Father’s/Stepfather’s and Mother’s/Stepmother’s Information: List the Social Security numbers, last names, first initials, and dates of birth of the parents required to report information on the FAFSA. If parents do not have Social Security numbers, they should enter all zeroes (as shown on this slide). Leaving this question blank may result in a delay in processing of the FAFSA. Make sure to fill in the parents’ birth dates. These dates are needed to determine how much of the parents’ assets should be protected for retirement. PARKER NOTE: Provide this information for your parent(s) who complete Section 3 of the worksheet 42

43 Section 3 Parents’ State of Legal Residence
CA M M Y Y Y Y Indicate the two-digit state code for your parents’ permanent address Leave question 74 blank if at least one of your parents whose information is used on this form began living in the state before January 1, 2004 For Parents State of Legal Residence: indicate the two-letter abbreviation for the parents' current state of residence. The parents' residence is their true, fixed, and permanent home. If the parents are separated or divorced, use the state of legal residence for the parent whose information is reported on the FAFSA. The next question asks if the parents began living in that state before January 1, States have varying criteria for determining whether a student is a resident for purposes of state financial aid. "Yes" is the appropriate response if the parents became residents of their state before January 1, 2004 or "No" if the parents became residents of their state on or after January 1, 2004. If the answer to the prior question is “No,” then parents should enter the month and year for the custodial parent who has been a legal resident of the state the longest. 43

44 Section 3 Parents’ Tax Return Filing Status for 2008
Indicate your parents’ current tax filing status for 2008 Which tax return did or will your parents file for 2008? Even if your parent(s) did not file a 1040A or 1040EZ, read the instructions to see if they would have been eligible to do so The FOTW Web site will ask if your parents have completed their 2008 tax return The next questions in Section 3 ask about parents and their 2008 federal tax returns. Question 83 asks if parents will file a IRS form Foreign Tax Return; or A or 1040EZ form tax return with Puerto Rico, another U.S. territory or a Freely Associated State The next question asks parents whether, regardless of which IRS form they completed, they were eligible to complete a 1040A or 1040EZ. Tax preparers often file a Form 1040 or an electronic 1040 on behalf of a tax filer, even though that person's income and tax filing circumstances would allow them to file a 1040A or 1040EZ. Page 4 of the worksheet explains that tax filers are eligible to submit a 1040A or 1040EZ if they: make less than $100,000 and do not itemize deductions and do not earn any income from self-employment from a business or farm and do not receive alimony and have no capital gains requiring Schedule D filing. The FAFSA Website will also ask whether the parents have completed their tax returns or whether the information they are using is estimated. 44

45 Section 3 Parents’ Household 2008 Federal Benefits
Receiving benefits from one of the federal programs listed on the FAFSA affects the way in which the federal processor will calculate the parent expected family contribution, or EFC. If the student, the student’s parents, or a member of the parents’ household (as reported in Question 75) received benefits from one of the following federal programs, fill in the corresponding oval: Supplemental Security Income (SSI) Food Stamps Free or Reduced Price Lunch Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) If members of the parents’ household received benefits from more than one federal program, the student should fill in the ovals for all the programs from which benefits were received. Indicate if you, your parents, or anyone in your parents’ household received benefits in 2008 from any of the federal programs listed 45

46 Section 3 Parent Dislocated Worker
A person may be considered a dislocated worker if he or she: is receiving unemployment benefits due to being laid off or losing a job and is unlikely to return to a previous occupation has been laid off or received a lay-off notice from a job was self-employed but is now unemployed due to economic conditions or natural disaster is a displaced homemaker In general, a person may be considered a dislocated worker if he or she: is receiving unemployment benefits due to being laid off or losing a job and is unlikely to return to a previous occupation; has been laid off or received a lay-off notice from a job; was self-employed but is now unemployed due to economic conditions or natural disaster; or is a displaced homemaker. A displaced homemaker is generally a person who previously provided unpaid services to the family (e.g., a stay-at-home mom or dad), is no longer supported by the husband or wife, is unemployed or underemployed and is having trouble finding or upgrading employment. If one or both custodial parents meet any of the qualifications for being considered as a Dislocated Worker, they will receive special consideration when calculating the family contribution for the student’s education. 46 46

47 Section 3 Parent 2008 Adjusted Gross Income
45,250 If your parents have not yet filed their 2008 federal tax return information, it is fine to estimate information for these questions If your parents have completed their 2008 federal tax return, use 2008 tax return information to complete this item. Pay attention to specific line-items on 2008 federal tax return, if completed The next two questions ask about parents’ 2008 adjusted gross income (or AGI) and about their earned income from all sources. Remember, if custodial parents have not yet filed their 2008 federal tax return, it is fine to use estimated 2008 income information on the FAFSA. There will be sufficient time to update this information when the actual 2008 federal tax return is completed. The first question asks specifically about parents’ 2008 AGI; that is, the total of all income they will list on their 2008 federal income tax form. This figure includes their wages as well as other income such as interest and dividend income, business and rental property income, as well as the taxable portion of pensions and Social Security benefits. Reminder: If the answer is zero or the question does not apply, enter 0 47

48 Section 3 Money Earned from Work by Parent(s) in 2008
45,250 40,500 Use W-2 forms and other records to list all income in 2008 earned from work (including income earned from self-employment) When the Department of Education's processor calculates the parents' Expected Family Contribution (EFC), certain allowances are subtracted from the parents' income for required taxes and necessary expenses (such as income and Social Security taxes and basic living costs). The parents' income earned from work will also be used in the EFC calculation as an income factor when no tax form is filed. These next questions ask about custodial parent earnings from sources such as wages, salaries and tips. These questions must be answered whether or not the parents file a tax return. This information may be on their W-2 forms, or on IRS Form 1040—lines plus Box 14 of IRS Schedule K-1 (Form 1065); 1040A—line 7; or 1040EZ—line 1. Parents who own a business or farm should report any income from these sources here as well so that Social Security taxes paid can be properly calculated. 48

49 Section 3 Parents’ Income Tax Paid in 2008
2,130 What was the amount your parents paid in income tax for 2008? Use U.S. Income tax paid (or to be paid) not the amount withheld from your parents’ paychecks For the next question, parents’ income tax for 2008, use U.S. income tax paid (or to be paid)—not the amount withheld by employers or pre-paid by self-employed parents. 49

50 Section 3 Parents’ 2008 Tax Exemptions
05 Enter your parents’ exemptions for 2008 Exemptions can be found on their IRS tax return Be sure to include all persons being claimed on your parents’ 2008 federal tax return, regardless of whether they are included in your parents’ household size question For parents’ exemptions for 2008, be sure to include all persons being claimed as exemptions on the parent 2008 federal tax return, regardless of whether they are included in the parents’ answer to the household size question. 50

51 Section 3 Parents’ Household Information for 2009-10
05 Include in your parents’ household: yourself your parent(s) your parents’ other dependent children, if your parents provide more than half their support or the children could answer “no” to every question in Section 2, regardless of where they live other people, if they now live with your parents and will continue to do so from 7/1/09 through 6/30/10, and if your parents provide more than half their support now, and will continue to provide support from 7/1/09 through 6/30/10 The number of family members reported directly affects the family’s ability to contribute to the student’s education costs. The following persons should be included in the parents' household size in this question: The student applicant should always be included even if not currently living with parents Parents (excluding a parent not living in the household as a result of death, separation, or divorce) - Parents' other children, if the parents will provide more than half of their support from July 1, 2009, through June 30, 2010, OR the children could answer "no" to all questions in Section 2 about their dependency (regardless of whether they live with the student’s parents) - Other people (aunts, uncles, grandparents, etc.) ONLY IF they now live with the student’s parents and will continue to do so from July 1, 2009, through June 30, 2010, AND the student’s parents provide more than one-half of their support now and will continue to provide more than half of their support from July 1, 2009, through June 30, 2010. 51

52 Section 3 Family Members Attending College in 2009-10
Always include yourself even if you will attend college less than half-time in Include other household members only if they will attend at least half time in in a program that leads to a college degree or certificate Never include your parents Family Members Attending College: This question asks for the number of household members in the previous question who, in , will be enrolled in a postsecondary school. --Always include the student, even if he/she will be enrolled less than half-time --Include others only if they’ll be attending at least half time in a program that leads to a degree or certificate at a postsecondary school eligible to participate in any of the federal student aid programs. --Do not include parents. --Also do not include a student at a U.S. military academy because the family does not pay for his/her education (i.e., their entire education is paid for). NOTE: The student’s parents cannot be included in the number of family members in college. However, if one or both of the custodial parents will be enrolled in college during the academic year, the family should be advised to contact the colleges to which the student is applying for admission and financial aid. The student should provide these colleges with written information about the reason why the parent is attending college and document the costs involved. The school may choose to recognize those additional family expenses in calculating the student’s eligibility for financial aid. NOTE: Some financial aid offices will require proof that other family members are attending college 52

53 Section 3 2008 Additional Financial Information
12,600 This Additional Financial Information sheet asks questions about information not considered as part of parental income when calculating student need. For example, if either of the custodial parents is paying child support for a child in another household, this amount will be subtracted from the total custodial parent income. Complete the column on the left and enter the total on Question 94 on page 5, Section 3 of the FOTW Worksheet. 10,200 2,500 Enter the total from this Additional Financial Information Sheet on Question 94 on page 5, Section 3 53 53

54 Section 3 2008 Untaxed Income
1,700 6,200 This 2008 Untaxed Income sheet asks questions about untaxed income the custodial parents earned or received. Parents should be sure to include pre-tax contributions they (not employers) have made to 2008 tax deferred pensions, retirement savings plans, IRAs and Keoghs. Additionally, parents should include other untaxed income such as child support received in 2008 for all children (including you), tax exempt interest income, housing/food and other living allowances as well as any income not reported elsewhere on the form. Complete the column on the left and enter the total on Question 95 on page 5, Section 3 of the FOTW Worksheet. Some colleges and universities may ask for information about other untaxed income, such as untaxed foreign income. They may also for documentation of any information reported here. 500 Enter the total from this 2008 Untaxed Income Sheet on Question 95 on page 5, Section 3 54 54

55 Section 3 Parent Asset Information
List the net value of your parents’ assets as of the day you complete the FAFSA If net worth is one million dollars or more, enter If net worth is zero, enter 0 An asset is defined as property that has an exchange value. The purpose of collecting asset information is to determine whether the family's assets are substantial enough to support a contribution toward the student’s educational expenses. Only the net asset value is counted in the need analysis. To determine the net value of any asset, first determine the market value of the asset and then reduce the value by the amount of debt against that asset. The result is the net value of the asset. Section 3 (Parental Information) asks information about custodial parents’ assets as of the day the FAFSA is actually completed in These questions are different than those that ask about 2008 parent income. We’ll talk more about assets in a moment. If the answer to any of these asset questions is $1 million or more, enter $999,999 as shown in the example. If the answer to any question is zero, enter “0.” Applicants should not leave any question blank. Be as accurate as possible in reporting assets. Some financial aid offices may request documentation of reported amounts. 9 $ , $ , NOTE: Some financial aid offices may request supporting documentation for the answers to these questions 55

56 Section 3 Parent Cash, Savings, and Checking
2,155 Report the current balance of your parents’ cash, savings, and checking accounts as of the day you complete the FAFSA The first parental asset question asks parents specifically about money they have in cash, savings, and checking accounts as of the day the student and his/her family complete the FAFSA. 56

57 Section 3 Parent Investments
7,900 Net Worth means current value minus debt Investments include: real estate (other than parents’ home) trust funds UGMA and UTMA accounts money market and mutual funds certificates of deposit stocks and stock options bonds and other securities Coverdell IRAs 529 plans owned by parents installment and land sale contracts commodities, etc. Let’s review what are considered to be investments and business values for Section 3 Asset questions. Investments include real estate (other than the parents’ home), trust funds, UGMA and UTMA accounts, money market and mutual funds, certificates of deposit, stocks and stock options, bonds and other securities, Coverdell education IRAs, college savings plans including 529(c) plans owned by parents, installment and land sale contracts, commodities, etc. NOTE TO PRESENTER: The UGMA and UTMA shown above should be listed as parent assets if they belong to the parents. Student UGMA and UTMA accounts must be listed in Section 4 – Student Finances. 57

58 Section 3 Parent Business and Investment Farms
23,600 Business/Investment Farm includes: market value of land, buildings, machinery, equipment, and inventory. Debt means only those debts for which the business was used as collateral Business and/or Investment Farm value includes the market value of land, buildings, machinery, equipment, and inventory. Debt means only those debts for which the business/investment farm was used as collateral. Keep in mind that the net worth (the current value minus debt) of assets should be reported. Make sure that you do not report any cash, savings, or checking account funds already reported in Question 91 or that will be reported in Question 41 in Section 4. And, remember, parents should not report assets such as the family home, the value of any life insurance, or the value of a family owned and controlled small business with 100 or fewer full-time or full-time equivalent employees. And, most important, they do not report any accumulated funds in retirement accounts, such as Roth or traditional IRA’s, pension funds, KEOGH, 401K, 403B, or other plans. If a college or university wants information about any of these assets, they will ask the student to send that information directly to the school. NOTE: DO NOT include the home you live in, the value of life insurance and parent retirement plans (pension funds, annuities, non-education IRAs, Keogh plans, etc), or the value of a family owned and controlled small business with 100 or fewer full-time or full-time equivalent employees 58

59 Section 4 (page 6) STUDENT FINANCES
This section asks about student 2008 taxed and untaxed income and the current value of the student’s assets. 59

60 Section 4 Student Finances
Questions (34 – 40) are identical to the parent financial questions we covered in Section 3 In these questions in Section 4: Report your 2008 income If you are single, ignore references to “spouse” If you are married, report spouse’s income and assets The questions in Section 4 concerning student finances are identical to those in Section 3 for parents. We will not review the student income information in this section in any detail. If the student is single, separated, divorced, or widowed as of the date the form is completed, references to “spouse” should be ignored. If the student is married at the time the FAFSA is submitted, the spouse’s 2008 income and current value of combined student and spousal assets must be included even if the student was not married in 2008. The student should complete the information on Page 8 of the FOTW Worksheet and then transfer the totals to Section 4, paying special attention to the questions about any untaxed income received. How many students here today are considered independent for purposes of completing the FAFSA? NOTE TO PRESENTERS: Based on the number of participants in the audience who respond affirmatively to being independent, either have the students see you after the formal presentation or review Questions at this point using the FOTW Worksheet. 60

61 Student Veterans’ Education Benefits
Section 4 Student Veterans’ Education Benefits For more information on Veterans’ Education Benefits, contact the VA at: (800) or If students will be receiving any Veterans’ Education Benefits between July 1, 2009, and June 30, 2010, they should report the type of expected VA education benefits they expect to receive in Question 45. Student Veterans’ Education Benefits include: --Montgomery GI Bill - Active Duty (Chapter 30) --Post-9/11 GI Bill (Chapter 33) --Montgomery GI Bill – Selected Reserve (Chapter 1606) --Reserve Educational Assistance Program (Chapter 1607) --Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment (Chapter 31) --Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) scholarship --Dependents’ Educational Assistance (DEA) --Any other type of veterans’ education benefits Students should not include their spouse's veterans’ education benefits. If students need information about Veterans’ Education Benefits, they should contact the VA’s toll free phone number at (800) Students can also use the national web site: 61

62 Section 4 Student Finances (Independent Students)
Answer questions (96 – 103) in Section 4 only if you answered “yes” to at least one question in Section 2 – Student Dependency Status Dependent Students SKIP THESE QUESTIONS Questions provide information about those students who answered “yes” to at least one of the questions in Section 2. Students who answered “no” to all of the Section 2 questions should skip these questions. NOTE TO PRESENTERS: You may want to use this slide if you are reviewing questions for independent students. If not, skip. . 62

63 Section 4 Student Finances (Independent Students)
Include in your household: you (and your spouse if married) your children, if you will provide more than half their support other people, if they now live with you and you provide more than half their support, and will continue to provide that level of support from 7/1/09 through 6/30/10 Question 96 asks the Independent Student about the expected size of his/her household from July 1, 2009, to June 30, 2010. Dependent Students SKIP THIS QUESTION 63

64 Section 4 Student Finances (Independent Students)
Count yourself even if you will attend college less than half-time in Include others only if they will attend at least half-time in in a program that leads to a college degree or certificate Question 97 asks the Independent Student about the number of family members who expect to be attending college at least half-time between July 1, 2009, and June 30, This number always includes the student. Dependent Students SKIP THIS QUESTION 64

65 Section 4 Household Federal Benefits (Independent Students)
Receiving benefits from one of the federal programs listed on the FAFSA affects the way in which the federal processor will calculate your expected family contribution, or EFC. If the Independent Student, the student’s spouse, or a member of the Independent Student’s household (as indicated in earlier question) received benefits from one of the following federal programs, he/she should fill in the corresponding oval: Supplemental Security Income (SSI) Food Stamps Free or Reduced Price School Lunch Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) If members of the student’s household received benefits from more than one federal program, fill in the boxes for all the programs from which benefits were received. Indicate if you, your spouse, or anyone in your household received benefits in 2008 from any of the federal programs listed Dependent Students SKIP THIS QUESTION 65

66 Section 4 Dislocated Worker (Independent Students)
A person may be considered a dislocated worker if he or she: is receiving unemployment benefits due to being laid off or losing a job and is unlikely to return to a previous occupation has been laid off or received a lay-off notice from a job was self-employed but is now unemployed due to economic conditions or natural disaster is a displaced homemaker In general, a person may be considered a dislocated worker if he or she: is receiving unemployment benefits due to being laid off or losing a job and is unlikely to return to a previous occupation; has been laid off or received a lay-off notice from a job; was self-employed but is now unemployed due to economic conditions or natural disaster; or is a displaced homemaker. A displaced homemaker is generally a person who previously provided unpaid services to the family (e.g., a stay-at-home mom or dad), is no longer supported by the husband or wife, is unemployed or underemployed and is having trouble finding or upgrading employment. If one or both custodial parents meet any of the qualifications for being considered as a Dislocated Worker, they will receive special consideration when calculating the family contribution for the student’s education. Dependent Students SKIP THIS QUESTION 66 66

67 Section 5 (middle of page 7) COLLEGES TO RECEIVE INFORMATION
This section asks about the schools to which students want their FAFSA information sent and where they will live if they attend a specific school. Section 5 (middle of page 7) COLLEGES TO RECEIVE INFORMATION 67

68 Section 5 School Information
001170 001328 023456 034567 Students may list up to ten schools in Section 5 of FOTW. Note: the paper FAFSA allows students to list only four schools. If students want to send their information to more than ten schools, they can delete and add schools when they receive their electronic Student Aid Report Information Acknowledgement or paper Student Aid Report (SAR). First, list the California school you are most likely to attend, and then list others to which you are applying for admission. Students will need to use a code for each of the schools listed in Section 5. These codes are not in the FAFSA instructions; they are provided in the "Federal School Code List" that the Department makes available to high schools, colleges, and public libraries each fall. We have copies of this code listing with us today and will be happy to let you check it for your college code numbers at the end of today’s workshop. The U.S. Department of Education also makes this list available at We suggest the students search first by the state in which the school is located, then look for the school code. This code number is different from the SAT, ACT, and CSS Financial Aid PROFILE code numbers. In the section below, the student selects a planned living arrangement “on campus,” “with parent,” or “off campus,” for each school listed. The student should list “on campus” if unsure whether he or she will live with parents or not. It’s important to keep in mind that the U.S. Department of Education's processor will send data to only ten schools at a time for one student. For example, if the student originally listed ten schools on the application and then replaced all ten with new schools by changing his/her SAR, only the second set of ten schools will get data from any subsequent corrections made to the FAFSA data. Please note that the codes shown in questions above are only examples. Do not use them as they are not valid codes. First, list the California school you are most likely to attend, and then list others to which you are applying for admission 68

69 Section 5 School Information
List up to ten schools to which you are applying For faster and more accurate processing, write in both the Title IV school code and the school name Check with each college’s financial aid office, your high school counselor, or the U.S. Department of Education’s website (www.fafsa.ed.gov) for a listing of federal school codes of the colleges to which you are applying Select the housing plan that best describes the type of housing you expect to have while attending each listed school This slide recaps some of the important highlights we just covered for Section 5. If students do not know the code when completing the worksheet, they should write in the names of the schools. Students will have an opportunity to look up the codes when completing the online FAFSA. As we said, the student should list each school’s Federal School Code. Section 5 allows students to send their family information to up to ten schools and offers them an opportunity to add additional schools after the FOTW is processed. And, finally, students should select the housing plan that best describes the type of housing they expect to have while attending each listed school. 69

70 Section 5 School Information
Strategies for Listing Colleges List at least one California college or university first In Question 97, list those schools with the earliest financial aid deadlines, regardless of whether they are in-state or out-of-state If the student is applying to more than ten schools, wait for the processed Student Aid Report (SAR) and add additional schools via the Web or by phone Here are some tips for completing Section 5 — especially if the student is applying for financial aid at more than ten colleges or universities. Students should make sure to list at least one California college or university first. List the schools with the earliest financial aid deadlines, regardless of the state where the schools are located. Students should make sure to include their first and second choice schools. Students applying to more than ten schools can add additional schools when they receive their processed Student Aid Report (SAR). We strongly recommend that students sending their financial aid information to a large number of schools use FAFSA on the Web and sign the form using PINs. This will make adding additional schools even easier and faster. Financial aid is awarded by each individual campus. Therefore, each UC and CSU campus to which the student is applying for financial aid must be listed separately in Section 5 of the FOTW. For Cal Grant Entitlement purposes, if a student attends a school that is not the first choice listed on the FAFSA, the student should contact the California Student Aid Commission. NOTE: Each UC and CSU campus must be listed separately 70

71 We have just reviewed the FAFSA on the Web Worksheet
We have just reviewed the FAFSA on the Web Worksheet. This worksheet should not be mailed to the federal processor. Students should use this worksheet when they complete the online FAFSA at It is important that both students and their parents read the FAFSA on the Web Certification Statement before submitting the FAFSA; be sure students and their families understand to what they are agreeing. Students should make sure to fill in the date they and their parents complete the FAFSA. The student and at least one of his/her custodial parents must sign the FAFSA. When submitting the FAFSA electronically on the Web, the student and at least one custodial parent must provide their own individual PINs. Remember, students and their custodial parents can get their PINs today at Students and parents should not share their PINs with anyone else. There are a number of individuals who will offer to assist the student and family in completing the FAFSA. Be very cautious about paying anyone a fee to help complete the FAFSA. You can do it! And we are here today to provide the free assistance you need to complete the FAFSA. Students should also feel free to contact the financial aid offices at the schools to which they are applying for help with the application process. 71

72 TYPES OF FAFSAs FAFSA on the Web Paper FAFSA 72
There are two ways to submit the FAFSA: students and their families can submit the FAFSA electronically using FAFSA on the Web as we have discussed today, or they can submit the paper FAFSA We strongly encourage families to complete the FAFSA on the Web rather than the paper FAFSA. Paper FAFSA 72

73 FAFSA ON THE WEB Internet application used by students and parents to complete electronic FAFSA at Processed more quickly than paper version Sophisticated on-line edits so that errors are less likely to be made Student and at least one custodial parent should get a federal PIN at There are several advantages to submitting the FAFSA using FAFSA on the Web: The primary benefit of using FAFSA on the Web is that the processing time is significantly reduced. Students and schools receive a response from the federal processor more quickly, which in turn assists schools in preparing a more timely notification of eligibility. (This is a definite advantage if you are trying to decide between two or more schools). Fewer errors on the form. Built-in edit checks will not allow the family to go to the next section if something is left incomplete in a prior section. Before submitting the FAFSA, the program will do a final review of the entire application, checking for missing and/or conflicting information. In many cases, drop down boxes are provided so you may choose from a selection of responses, rather than having to find choices as in the paper FAFSA booklet. There are fewer questions to complete. (Example: unmarried students will not be asked questions about their spouse.) Immediately upon submitting the FAFSA on the Web, a confirmation page may be printed to verify instantly that the application has been submitted. This page will contain a Confirmation Stamp showing the date and time that the FAFSA was successfully submitted. To take full advantage of FAFSA on the Web, remember that the student and at least one of his or her custodial parents each must have a federal PIN. 73

74 Application Filing Tips FAFSA on The Web
Gather necessary documents ahead of time Complete a FAFSA on the Web Worksheet available at Allow ample time to complete form for submission by deadline Check the FAFSA for accuracy prior to submission Save all work periodically Sign the application using student and at least one parent’s PIN Print out a copy of the FAFSA before submitting data Keep a copy of the Submission Confirmation Page If the student has access to the Internet, we encourage students and their parents to file using FAFSA on the Web. Let’s review some tips for those who choose to file electronically: Apply for the student’s and at least one parent’s PIN’s as soon as possible at Gather necessary documents ahead of time so that completing the application is faster and easier. Completing a FAFSA on the Web Worksheet also makes completing the electronic FAFSA faster and even easier. Use the FOTW Worksheet distributed today or print one by going to Allow ample time to complete the FAFSA for submission by published deadline(s). Assume that the electronic deadline is East Coast time, not California time. Check the FAFSA for accuracy prior to submission. Save your work often. We all know how frustrating it is to work on something electronically and lose it because we haven’t saved it. Sign the application using the student’s and at least one custodial parent’s PIN. Print out a copy of the FAFSA before submitting data electronically. Print and keep a copy of the Submission Confirmation Page for your financial aid file. 74

75 Application Filing Tips Paper FAFSA
File early and meet all deadlines Check the FAFSA for completeness and accuracy Sign and date FAFSA Make a copy of the FAFSA before mailing Mail the FAFSA Do not write any comments on the FAFSA Do not include letters, tax forms, or worksheets Use regular mail (not Registered or Certified) Obtain a U.S. Postal Service Certificate of Mailing (cost is only $1.05) If completing the Paper FAFSA, we suggest that students: Complete and mail the FAFSA at least a week before it is due. Meeting deadlines means they will be considered for all available aid for which they are eligible. Check the FAFSA for completeness and accuracy; correcting the paper FAFSA takes time! Ensure that he/she and one of his or her custodial parents sign and date the FAFSA. Mail the FAFSA in the envelope provided. Not write on the FAFSA or attach any other forms or letters. Any items enclosed with or attached to the FAFSA (other than the postcard) will be destroyed. Send any additional materials directly to the school. Use regular, not Registered or Certified, mail. Do not use any special mailing services such as FedEx or UPS. And, finally, when ready to mail the FAFSA, the student should go to the Post Office, and get a U.S. Postal Service Certificate of Mailing. It costs $1.05 cents and will provide proof of the date the FAFSA was mailed. 75

76 Student Aid Report (SAR)
Regardless of whether the student uses FAFSA on the Web or submits a paper FAFSA, a SAR will be sent to the student An electronic SAR will be sent if student provides an address A paper SAR will be mailed if no student address is provided An electronic copy of the data will be sent to each college or university listed by the student in Section 5 Now we want to explain the Student Aid Report, often referred to as the SAR. Regardless of how a student files (using either FAFSA on the Web or the paper FAFSA), an electronic SAR or E-SAR will be sent if the student provides an address on the FAFSA. If the student does not provide an address, a paper SAR will be mailed to the student at the address entered on the FAFSA. The student can make corrections on the SAR, as well as add additional colleges which will then be sent the student’s information. Each college or university the student lists in Section 5 on the FAFSA will receive an Institutional Student Information Report or “ISIR.” This is an electronic record of all the information the family reported on the FAFSA. 76 76

77 What Happens Next? Students and the colleges the student listed receive Student Aid Report (SAR) from federal processor ê Students who complete FAFSA and Cal Grant GPA Verification Form receive California Aid Report (CAR) Students and families review SAR and CAR for important information and accuracy of data Colleges match admission records with financial aid applications and determine aid eligibility Colleges mail notices of financial aid eligibility to admitted students who have completed all required financial aid forms Within two weeks after filing the FAFSA, the student should receive a Student Aid Report (SAR) from the federal processor. The SAR summarizes the information the family provided on the FAFSA. Each school listed on the SAR will also receive the information electronically. If the student does not receive the SAR within three weeks, he/she should contact the federal processor to check on the status of the FAFSA; call FED AID; that’s or check on the status of your FAFSA by going to FAFSA on the Web and using your PIN. When the California Student Aid Commission evaluates the student’s FAFSA and Cal Grant GPA Verification Form, you will receive a California Aid Report (CAR) that will provide you information about your Cal Grant eligibility. Once each school receives the electronic SAR and all other required financial aid forms, and confirms the student’s admission status, the financial aid office will determine the student’s financial aid eligibility. Some schools may request that the student submit income documentation such as student and parent 2008 federal income tax returns, including W-2s and all schedules and attachments, before sending the student a final determination of eligibility. The school will use this and any other requested information to verify the accuracy of the data provided on the FAFSA. Schools understand that many families have used estimated data. A financial aid notification (commonly referred to as an award letter) describing the amounts and sources of aid the student has been awarded will be prepared for the student when the student’s financial aid application is complete. Most schools will wait until the student has been accepted for admission to notify him or her about financial aid eligibility. Some schools will mail a paper financial aid award to the student; others may provide the award electronically. In some cases, the student will be required to sign and return a copy of the financial aid award notification, indicating whether he/she accepts or declines each source of aid. If family circumstances change after the student completes the FAFSA and other required financial aid documents, make sure to contact the financial aid office at each school as soon as possible. 77

78 Special Circumstances
Contact the Financial Aid Office if there is: Loss or reduction in parent or student income or assets Death or serious illness Natural disasters affecting parent income or assets Unusual medical or dental expenses not covered by insurance Reduction in child support, social security benefits or other untaxed benefit Financial responsibility for elderly grandparents Any other unusual circumstances that affect a family’s ability to contribute to higher education As mentioned earlier, many families have special circumstances not reflected by the questions on the FAFSA. Families are encouraged to contact the Financial Aid Office at each of the schools to which they are applying for admission and financial aid if there are significant changes in their circumstances such as: A loss or reduction in parent or student income or assets A death or serious illness Natural disasters that affect parent income or assets – this is especially true for any family adversely affected by the recent California wildfires Unusual medical or dental expenses not covered by insurance Reduction in child support or social security benefits Financial responsibility for elderly grandparents, or Any other unusual circumstances that affect a family’s ability to contribute to higher education. If the family feels there are special circumstances that may impact their ability to contribute to college, it is important that they present their case in a way that helps the financial aid office understand their unique challenges. Some schools will provide special forms to help the family provide the appropriate new information. Families are encouraged to: Contact the financial aid office for guidance Write a detailed explanation of circumstances Include student’s name, college or university ID#, and date of birth Give specific financial details including the reasons why the circumstances affect the family’s ability to contribute Attach supporting documentation Send to the financial aid office at each school to which the student is applying Each financial aid office will make its own decision about the effect the special circumstances have on a student’s need. Not all aid offices will be able to provide additional funds if there are special circumstances, but they might be able to suggest other options. 78

79 Summary of the Financial Aid Process
Submit all required forms, including the FAFSA, by each college’s published deadlines (but no later than March 2) By March 2, submit a Cal Grant GPA Verification Form Keep a copy of all forms submitted Review the electronic Student Aid Report (SAR) Acknowledgement or the paper SAR sent to the student Review the California Aid Report (CAR) Watch for financial aid award notifications from colleges to which the student has been admitted Be sure to apply for financial aid this year and every year as soon as possible after January 1 to receive the best financial aid award possible ASK QUESTIONS! Let’s now recap the steps involved in applying for financial aid: Colleges and universities may have their own deadline dates for applying for financial aid. Make sure you know what those dates are and what financial aid forms and documents are required. To make sure students are considered for Cal Grants, as soon as possible after January 1, 2009, but no later than March 2, 2009, they should submit both: the FAFSA, and the Cal Grant GPA Verification Form. Students should keep a copy of all forms they submit and copies of all documentation used to complete those forms. Review the electronic Student Aid Report (SAR) or paper SAR Acknowledgement. Review the California Aid Report (CAR) which provides information about the student’s Cal Grant eligibility. After students have been admitted to one or more colleges, watch for financial aid award notifications. These notifications are sometimes called financial aid awards or packages and will list the grant, scholarship, work-study and loan amounts the student might be eligible to receive. Applying for financial aid each year by the published deadlines assures that student is considered for the maximum amount of financial aid. ASK QUESTIONS! If you do not understand what to do next, or what is required of you – be sure to ask for help! Note to Presenters: Remind the group that students should file all their financial aid forms by each college’s published deadline or March 2, 2009 – whichever date comes first. Remember, meet all deadlines. Don’t miss out on any financial aid opportunities. 79

80 Questions and Answers 80 We hope you have found this workshop helpful.
We will now be glad to answer any general questions you and your family might have. After a brief question and answer period, volunteers will be available to help you complete your FAFSA, the Cal Grant GPA Verification Forms, and answer any questions about other financial aid documents. 80


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