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Biotechnology Council Presentation Richard L. Doyle, PE Chair, Biotech Council 5677 Soledad Rd. La Jolla, CA 92037 Web:

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Presentation on theme: "Biotechnology Council Presentation Richard L. Doyle, PE Chair, Biotech Council 5677 Soledad Rd. La Jolla, CA 92037 Web:"— Presentation transcript:

1 Biotechnology Council Presentation Richard L. Doyle, PE Chair, Biotech Council 5677 Soledad Rd. La Jolla, CA 92037 Email: r.doyle@ieee.org Web: http://www.laacn.org/firms/doyle

2 Biotechnology Council Presentation oRichard L. Doyle oThe Hague, Netherlands o09:45 AM oJune 8, 2006 oICMCC Conference oInvited Speaker This Biotech Council presentation applies to a broad scope of Electronic Medical Records, E-Health Standards and Encouraging new Biomedical Technologies

3 Biotechnology Council Presentation oELECTRONIC MEDICAL RECORDS oE-HEALTH STANDARDS oDIAGNOSTICS AND HOME HEALTH CARE oENCOURGAGING NEW BIOMEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES oCOMPUTER AIDED HEALTH CARE

4 Introduction Before the presentation of the key points just mentioned the following will be provided. Brief History of our Biotech Council. Mission, Vision and Organization. Major areas of interests and how they relate to ICMCC.

5 Council History Biotechnology Council was Established in November 2004 at a Joint Meeting of 10 Societies (8 present) in San Antonio. IEEE (New Technology Directions Committee) was the host and sponsor.

6 Mission To facilitate the advancement of biotechnology by the integration of engineering, medicine, and science for the benefit of humanity. Vision A collaborative of biotechnology stakeholders working synergistically to promote development, adoption and deployment of technology and related processes. Membership (May 2006) There are a total of 10 non-profit Engineering and Medical societies that presently form the Council Members of each of these 10 societies are members of the Biotechnology Council. Mission, Vision & Membership

7 Scientific and Medical Society Participants (10 Societies) –American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE), Society for Biotechnology –American Medical Association (AMA) –American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA) –American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) –Biomedical Engineering Society (BMES) –Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS) –Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) –Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) –Society for Computer Applications in Radiology (SCAR) –Society for Biomaterials (SFB) Corresponding Only

8 Other Potential Council Members Biomedical Related Societies in Europe and Asia Are Potential Candidates for Our Council (we may also consider Bioelectronics and Nanotechnology)

9 Potential partners for collaboration Government Organizations: –DHHS (Department of Health and Human Services) –EPA, DOE, USDA, VA, etc. Institutions: –Non-Profit Universities and Research Laboratories Other Organizations in Biotechnology: –Non-Profit and For-Profit Organizations Industry: –For-Profit Corporations & Laboratories

10 Areas of Interest MOST POPULAR AREAS OF INTEREST: Implantable and wearable devices Biotechnology sensors, circuits and systems Electronic Medical Records Medical Imaging Healthcare Delivery Bio-nanotechnology Telemedicine Medical Device ID and Tracking

11 Biotechnology Council Presentation oELECTRONIC MEDICAL RECORDS oE-HEALTH STANDARDS oDIAGNOSTICS AND HOME HEALTH CARE oENCOURGAGING NEW BIOMEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES oCOMPUTER AIDED HEALTH CARE

12 Medical Records Security is Major Concern –Information Required –Health, Medical, and Implants History. –Psychological Records –Dreaded Diseases Records. OTHER AREAS OF INTEREST: –Privacy and security in health information –Geriatric Healthcare –Home Health, Global Health –Medical Errors –Interoperability Electronic Medical Records and other Areas of Interests

13 Electronic Medical Records Must be implemented in 10 years in the US. Medical Records Security is Major Concern

14 Biotechnology Council (Nov 18, 05) Institute of Information Security, Workshop in Yokohama, Japan By: Dick Doyle Chair, Biotech Council Society (2005)

15 Medical Records Security Information Required Health, Medical, and Implants History. Psychological Records Dreaded Diseases Records

16 Medical Records Security Where and how do you store the data. What Health, Medical, and Implant History do you store. Who can read Psychological Records Who can read Dreaded Diseases Records

17 Medical Records Security Spread Sheet PUBLIC PERSONAL DOCTOR HOSPITAL INSURANCE (list all above on Board and Work Problem). Include: Visits, Symptoms, Diagnosis, Tests, Treatment, etc.

18 Biotechnology Council Presentation oELECTRONIC MEDICAL RECORDS oE-HEALTH STANDARDS oDIAGNOSTICS AND HOME HEALTH CARE oENCOURGAGING NEW BIOMEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES oCOMPUTER AIDED HEALTH CARE

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20 06 December 2005 (From The Institute print edition) Medical Records: From Clipboard To Point-and-Click BY TRUDY E. BELL The Biotechnology Councils primary goal is nothing less than standardizing everything from medical terminology to networking protocols so that medical records can be stored electronically and sent instantly anywhere in the worldwith absolute privacy, security, and understandability.

21 06 December 2005 (From The Institute print edition) Medical Records: From Clipboard To Point-and-Click BY TRUDY E. BELL Call them electronic charts or electronic medical records: whatever the name, the days of patients medical conditions and diagnoses being written illegibly on paper and stored in manila folders are numbered. Medical records, according to plans under way, are going electronic. The days are numbered for storing medical records in paper folders, thanks partly to the IEEEs work on e-medical systems

22 Biotechnology Council Presentation oELECTRONIC MEDICAL RECORDS oE-HEALTH STANDARDS oDIAGNOSTICS AND HOME HEALTH CARE oENCOURGAGING NEW BIOMEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES oCOMPUTER AIDED HEALTH CARE

23 D 2 H 2 CONFERENCE 2 ND – 4 TH APRIL 06 Distributed Diagnosis and Home Healthcare (D 2 H 2 )

24 Decentralization of Healthcare via Distributed Diagnosis and Home Healthcare (D 2 H 2 ) The healthcare systems in most developed countries are facing serious challenges from multiple fronts, and are in need of significant transformations. Decentralization of healthcare via Distributed Diagnosis and Home Healthcare (D 2 H 2 ) is designed to tackle the current problems in healthcare and to accommodate future changes and trends by transforming the delivery of healthcare from a central, hospital-based system to one that is more patient-centered, distributed and home-based. D 2 H 2 will benefit patients by improving the quality and convenience of care, controlling healthcare cost, and preventing medical errors, thus leading to increased access to affordable and effective healthcare.

25 Healthcare Delivery Processes: Levels of Technology Adoption & Integration

26 Healthcare Technology for 21st Century Leadership American College of Clinical Engineering J. Michael Fitzmaurice, Ph.D. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality U.S. Department of Health and Human Services February 8, 2006

27 Biotechnology Council Presentation oELECTRONIC MEDICAL RECORDS oE-HEALTH STANDARDS oDIAGNOSTICS AND HOME HEALTH CARE oENCOURGAGING NEW BIOMEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES oCOMPUTER AIDED HEALTH CARE

28 Biotechnology & the Engineers Role Considered in Context Biotechnology & the Engineers Future role in healthcare can only be predicted by understanding The future developments in healthcare … and the forces likely to bring that future about Engineerings ability to contribute to future needs with respect to these developments Slide from Steve Grimes (HIMSS)

29 Four Primary Forces Affecting Future of Healthcare Industry Technological Economic Regulatory Social Slide from Steve Grimes (HIMSS)

30 Technological Forces Mapping the human genome Micro- and Nano- Technology Proliferation of computers in medicine –Knowledge-based, expert systems –Autonomic systems Connectivity … synergistic effect of interconnecting computers & other medical technology Slide from Steve Grimes (HIMSS)

31 Economic Forces Total US Healthcare industry expenditures Year 2001 ~ $1.4 trillion (14% of GDP) Year 2012 ~ $3.1 trillion (18% of GDP) Health insurance premiums from $177 billion in 1991 to $252 billion in 1996 increased by 11% in 2001 Administrative costs takes 19 to 24¢ out of every $1 spent on US healthcare New medical technology accounts for 19% of inpatient healthcare spending between 1998-2002 Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) over first 3 years represents 3.6 to 18.5 times initial technology cost Slide from Steve Grimes (HIMSS)

32 Regulatory Forces HIPAAs Administrative Simplification Reduce costs by adopting EDI & encourage electronic medical record Implement security IOM reports on Quality, Safety and Engineering Partnerships in Healthcare Industry efforts Integrating the Healthcare Environment (IHE) Leapfrog Slide from Steve Grimes (HIMSS)

33 Sociological Forces US Population over 65, between 2011 and 2030, will jump from 13% to over 20% Shifting demographics will cause nations healthcare to shift from acute, episodic to chronic conditions –Now 100 million have chronic conditions accounting for 60% of nations medical costs –In 2020, 157 million will have chronic conditions accounting for 80% of nations medical costs A generation of better informed healthcare consumers will demand effective & affordable care ~ a quality of life issue Slide from Steve Grimes (HIMSS)

34 Bioeconomics Workshop IEEE, AMA and AIMBE Co-Sponsors Biotechnology and its impact in the economy Biotechnology Innovation Present status of biotechnology Comments and Suggestions. Biotechnology Council Bioeconomics

35 CONCLUSION - Agree To Work Together Our group Agrees to work together in the field of Biotechnology: –Develop an Organizational Structure that can grow and Prosper. –Develop Conferences, Workshops and Educational Programs –Provide Newsletters, Web Pages, and Publications.

36 Agree To Work Together (Continued) Our group Agrees to support the field of Biotechnology by: –Developing complementary Standards. –Promoting common technology positions. –Sharing Membership products and materials at Member Prices. –Developing a Working Relationship through mutual understanding


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