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Slides 4 – 17 are extracted from the DAU FY08 Classroom Briefing.

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1 Slides 4 – 17 are extracted from the DAU FY08 Classroom Briefing.
Briefing for INCOSE Learn. Perform. Succeed. Slides 4 – 17 are extracted from the DAU FY08 Classroom Briefing. Our customers, the over 128,000 members of the DoD AT&L workforce are currently facing major challenges: Projected loss of experience and knowledge Need to adapt to evolutionary advances in information technologies Necessity of streamlining infrastructure Participating in the fundamental transformation of the Department of Defense To help our customers meet these challenges, we at DAU had to transform acquisition training. We transformed: Our organization Our curriculum content and delivery methods The concept of learning to extend beyond the course itself to include continuous learning, knowledge sharing, performance support, applied research, and strategic partnerships Because of our successful efforts in transforming DAU, we were recognized as The Best Overall Corporate University in 2002 at the Corporate University Best-In-Class awards A Gold Medal winner of Brandon Hall best practices for e-learning Winner of the American Society of Training & Development BEST Award Winner of Corporate University Xchange Excellence Award Member of Training Magazine’s Top 100 Our strategy is to provide you, the members of the AT&L community, premier career-long learning options to help you add value in your vital support to the warfighter. Rev. Oct 07

2 DAU Mission Provide practitioner training, career management, and services to enable the AT&L community to make smart business decisions and deliver timely and affordable capabilities to the warfighter. We train the AT&L Workforce through certification and assignment-specific courses We promote career-long learning through our Continuous Learning Center We offer performance support to the AT&L Workforce through consulting, Rapid Deployment Training, and targeted training We facilitate knowledge sharing through online resources and communities of practice Provide Human Capital Strategic Planning for the AT&L Workforce DAU is a training organization, not an academic university. It is the corporate university of the DoD AT&L workforce. As such, we focus on enabling this workforce to be effective in the workplace and accomplish AT&L strategic goals and business objectives. DAU provides: Certification and Assignment-Specific Training (stress to the students that certification course content is currently geared toward all personnel in the career field and the variety of work that they do. In the future, these courses will be shorter and more job-specific courses will be developed.) Performance Support / Rapid Deployment Training Continuous Learning Knowledge sharing With these learning assets, DAU providing learning opportunities 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. DAU Human Capital Strategic Planning: DAU also champions strategic, integrated workforce management programs and innovations to recruit, develop and retain a highly capable, motivated and agile DoD AT&L workforce. More details will be given in chart # 4 2

3 DAU Regional Orientation
We are part of the community… not just a place to go to take classes. Mid-Atlantic (Pax River) AT&L WF ~22,476 Capital & Northeast and DSMC (Fort Belvoir) AT&L WF ~33,357 In FY 02, we established five regional campuses in areas where the DoD Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics workforce is highly concentrated. (Walk around map) Each DAU location is fully equipped to accommodate student needs. Classrooms are furnished with state-of-the-art equipment to enhance the student’s learning experience. Locating near our customers allows us to avoid travel costs. We have used these cost avoidances to fund curriculum re-engineering and e-learning initiatives. Our customers are able to receive improved learning solutions at no increase in the DAU budget. Placing our resources closer to the customer allows our faculty to be real-time players with our customers, providing field organizations with performance support to help solve complex workplace issues and targeted training to supplement our regular courses We are a part of the community as opposed to a place to go to take classes. West (San Diego) AT&L WF ~25,408 Midwest (WP AFB) AT&L WF ~18,945 South (Huntsville) AT&L WF ~28,056 Located with our Customers

4 AT&L Performance Learning Model
24/7 Learning Assets for the Classroom and the Workplace Training Courses - DAWIA Certification, assignment-specific, and executive & leadership courses – in the classroom and online AKSS - Online gateway to AT&L information & tools ACC - Online collaboration communities tailored to your needs Virtual Library - Keeping you connected to research tools when you are not on campus Spend sufficient time on this chart so that the students understand that when they graduate from the course, DAU will continue to touch them back in their workplace with a variety of learning assets that are available 24/7. Go over each element. To help shape a culture that promotes career-long learning at the point of need, DAU adopted the Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics (AT&L) Performance Learning Model (PLM), which lays the foundation for meeting the professional development needs of the AT&L workforce. Training Courses offered at DAU were established as a result of the Defense Acquisition Workforce Improvement Act (DAWIA), which identifies education, training, and experience requirements for all AT&L workforce members by career field and certification level. In the ever-changing acquisition environment of the 21st century, however, it became clear that currency in any given career field required more than certification training alone. To complement the DAWIA requirements, DAU now offers learning assets that are accessible to all workforce members anytime, anywhere. Performance Support is tailored to the customer’s needs and may include consulting, coaching, mentoring, and facilitation. Rapid Deployment Training focuses attention on a limited number of emerging initiatives and delivers training within days of new policy implementation. Targeted training is tailored to the specific needs of an organization or integrated product team as required. The DAU Continuous Learning Center offers continuous learning opportunities designed to maintain currency and help employees meet the DoD requirement to complete 80 hours of continuous learning every 2 years. DAU also hosts and participates in a variety of public forum events, such as conferences, symposia, and expos, that promote learning and offer continuous learning opportunities. Knowledge Sharing is an inherent function of any educational institution. The AT&L Knowledge Sharing System provides online access to a variety of tools and reference materials that facilitate supporting the warfighter. The Acquisition Community Connection hosts online communities of practice that provide an electronic forum for sharing knowledge, information, lessons learned, and best practices. DAU’s David D. Acker Library supports the University’s curricula and its research in defense acquisitions. CL Modules - Online modules to help you earn continuous learning points Conferences PEO / SYSCOM Business Manager DAU Acquisition Community Conference Consulting - We come to your workplace to assist you Targeted Training - Tailored learning for your organization RDT - On-site and online training on the latest AT&L policies 4

5 Core Plus is Here! “Plus” or job competency point-of-need training (frequently CLMs) (tailored to your specific job or assignment) Core Plus is designed to guide workforce members to additional training beyond what’s required for certification. Career Field foundation knowledge and skills (all career field members) Common acquisition foundation knowledge & skills (all DoD AT&L workforce members) Core Plus is….a Value for AT&L Workforce Core Plus advances the AT&L Competency Management Model The right learning – better focus The right people – focused on competency needs The right time – better connection to job needs Keeps the 3-level certification framework Core Plus minimizes “scrap” learning by eliminating Wasted or irrelevant content – students who don’t need it Wrong time – students forget by the time they need it Core Plus helps implement concept of the “Engaged Learner” Targeted training at the point of user need Embraces life long learning Increased assignment specific work Increases modular course content Facilitates cross-functional integration with other career fields Core Plus is an enhancement to the existing AT&L certification framework. It is not a wholesale replacement!

6 Three Level Certification Framework
FY08 T&E Level II Core Plus Framework Three Level Certification Framework Acquisition & Functional Core DAWIA Certification Standards – applies to all career field members Tailored Cross-Functional “Plus” Training, Education & Experience Opportunities – based on the job or assignment Here is an example of what the new Core Plus framework looks like. We’ve picked the Logistics functional are to use as an example. This is what the framework for each of the functional area/career fields look like in the new FY2008 catalog. This chart just happens to show DAWIA level I, though it could just as easily have Level II or Level II. We’re showing only level I to cut down on the number of charts. Each career field/functional area will look similar but will have different requirements for training. Also, not every career field has 2 tracks like Logistics just with the acquisition logistics and sustainment logistics tracks. Just as we spoke a few minutes ago, CORE Plus is composed of the Acquisition Core, the Functional Core and the “Plus” part as you can see illustrated here. LOOK IN THE DAU CATALOG TO SEE THE FULL CORE PLUS FRAMEWORK FOR EACH CAREER FIELD. Though it’s too many charts to go through the Core Plus Framework for each DAWIA level of each career field here - we will take a look at the training required for certification in the different career fields at levels I thru III. REMEMBER, that training is just one part of the 3 part certification puzzle - education and experience are the remaining pieces. Also remember that DAU provides the training. DAU doesn’t grant degrees – though we have lots of agreements with lots if institutions of higher learning where there are equivalencies, more on that later. One more thing – DAU doesn't grant the DAWIA certifications. Only the DoD components (Army, Navy, Air Force, 4th Estate) can do that. EXAMPLE

7 FY08 Test & Evaluation Field Training
P = Prerequisite Level III Certification Level I Certification Level II Certification TST 203 Intermediate Test & Evaluation P P TST 302 Advanced Test and Evaluation ACQ 101 Fundamentals of Systems Acquisition Management P TST 102 Fundamentals of Test and Evaluation P ACQ 201 Intermediate Systems Acquisition 5 days classroom P 5 days classroom P 35 hrs, online 25 hrs, online SYS 202 Intermediate Systems Planning, Research, Development and Engineering, Part I 35 hours, online 1 week classroom SYS 101 Fundamentals of Systems Planning, Research, Development and Engineering CLM 029 Net-Ready Key Performance Parameter CLE 023 Modeling and Simulation for Test and Evaluation The DAU’s Learning Capabilities and Integration Center (LCIC) includes program directors for each career field. These recognized experts of the LCIC look across the entire curricula in each career field to ensure appropriate content, sequencing, and delivery. They closely interact with the DoD AT&L career field Functional Advisors and Functional Integrated Process Teams, who establish career field competencies, to develop training course content. They also work closely with the office of the USD (AT&L), Federal Agencies and industry to capture the latest initiatives and best practices and disseminate information to the workforce by a variety of means (e.g., the AKSS and various Communities of Practices [COPs] and Special Interest Areas [SIAs]). This chart shows the Core and Core Plus training requirements for the Test and Evaluation Career Track established by the T&E career field Functional Advisor. Career Field Transition Notes: (1) TST-101, TST-202 are acceptable pre-requisite predecessor courses for the new TST-203 and TST-302 courses, respectively (2) CLE 011 (M&S in Systems Engineering) if completed prior to October 1, 2007 is a valid predecessor CLM for the currently-required Level I CLM 023 Should you require further information please contact: [(703) (Choose the chart most appropriate for the class you are teaching and focus on it, rather than brief in detail all Career Field charts; also note to the students that the online DAU Catalog, Appendix B always has the latest information in this area) 30 hrs, online Knowledge based GS 5-9 & E7-O3 Case/scenario based GS & E7-O5 35 hrs, online Level I “Core Plus” Courses & CL Modules (See DAU catalog for details) Level II “Core Plus” Courses & CL Modules (See DAU catalog for details) Level III “Core Plus” Courses & CL Modules (See DAU catalog for details) Vers 8.1

8 FY08 SPRDE: Science & Technology Manager
P = Prerequisite Level I Certification Level II Certification Level III Certification ACQ 101 Fundamentals of Systems Acquisition Management P STM 201 Intermediate Science and Technology Management P STM 302 Advanced Science and Technology Management NONE 25 hrs, online 3 days classroom P CLE 021 Technology Readiness Assessment 5 days classroom The DAU has program directors for each career field. These recognized experts look across the entire curricula in each career field to ensure appropriate content, sequencing, and delivery. They closely interact with the DoD AT&L career field Functional Advisors and Functional Integrated Process Teams, who establish career field competencies, to develop training course content. They also work closely with the office of the USD (AT&L), Federal Agencies and industry to capture the latest initiatives and best practices and disseminate information to the workforce by a variety of means (e.g., the AKSS and various Communities of Practices [COPs] and Special Interest Areas [SIAs]). This chart shows the Core and Core Plus training requirements for the SPRDE: S&T Manager Career Track established by the career field Functional Advisor. Should you require further information please contact: [(703) ] (Choose the chart most appropriate for the class you are teaching and focus on it, rather than brief in detail all Career Field charts; also note to the students that the online DAU Catalog, Appendix B always has the latest information in this area) Knowledge and Application/case based GS 9-12 & E7-O4 Case/scenario based GS & E7-O5 Level II “Core Plus” Courses & CL Modules (See DAU catalog for details) Level III “Core Plus” Courses & CL Modules (See DAU catalog for details) Vers 8.1

9 FY08 SPRDE: Systems Engineering Training
P = Prerequisite Level III Certification Level I Certification Level II Certification SYS 202 Intermediate Systems Planning, Research, Development and Engineering, Part I CLL 008 Designing for Supportability in DoD Systems P P SYS 101 Fundamentals of Systems Planning, Research, Development and Engineering ACQ 201 Intermediate Systems Acquisition ACQ 101 Fundamentals of Systems Acquisition Management P 30 hrs, online P 35 hours, online 1 week classroom SYS 203 Intermediate Systems Planning, Research, Development and Engineering, Part II 25 hrs, online SYS 302 Technical Leadership in Systems Engineering P P 35 hrs, online CLE 003 Technical Reviews The DAU’s Learning Capabilities and Integration Center (LCIC) includes program directors for each career field. These recognized experts of the LCIC look across the entire curricula in each career field to ensure appropriate content, sequencing, and delivery. They closely interact with the DoD AT&L career field Functional Advisors and Functional Integrated Process Teams, who establish career field competencies, to develop training course content. They also work closely with the office of the USD (AT&L), Federal Agencies and industry to capture the latest initiatives and best practices and disseminate information to the workforce by a variety of means (e.g., the AKSS and various Communities of Practices [COPs] and Special Interest Areas [SIAs]). This chart shows the Core and Core Plus training requirements for SPRDE: Systems Engineer Career Track established by the SPRDE career field Functional Advisor. SPRDE: SE COURSE CAREER FIELD TRANSITION NOTES: (1) SYS-302 replaced SYS-301 effective February SYS-302 pre-requisite is either SYS-203 or SYS-201B (predecessor course). SYS 301 remains valid as a predecessor Level III certification course (2) SYS-203 replaced SYS-201B in late 1QFY07. SYS 202 replaced SYS 201A in 4QFY06. SYS-203 pre-requisite is either SYS-202 or SYS-201A (predecessor course). SYS 201A and SYS 201B both remain valid as predecessor Level II certification courses Should you require further information please contact: [(703) ] (Choose the chart most appropriate for the class you are teaching and focus on it, rather than brief in detail all Career Field charts; also note to the students that the online DAU Catalog, Appendix B always has the latest information in this area. For SYS classes, use both SPRDE: SE and SPRDE PSE charts) (Choose the chart most appropriate for the class you are teaching and focus on it, rather than brief in detail all Career Field charts) 10 days classroom Knowledge based GS 5-9 & E7-O3 Application/case based GS 9-12 & E7-O4 5 days classroom Case/scenario based GS & E7-O5 Level I “Core Plus” Courses & CL Modules (See DAU catalog for details) Level II “Core Plus” Courses & CL Modules (See DAU catalog for details) Level III “Core Plus” Courses & CL Modules (See DAU catalog for details) Vers 8.1

10 FY08 SPRDE: Program Systems Engineer Training (new career field)
P = Prerequisite Level I Certification Level II Certification Level III Certification SYS 202 Intermediate Systems Planning, Research, Development and Engineering, Part I P CLL 008 Designing for Supportability in DoD Systems P SYS 101 Fundamentals of Systems Planning, Research, Development and Engineering ACQ 201 Intermediate Systems Acquisition ACQ 101 Fundamentals of Systems Acquisition Management P 30 hrs, online P 35 hours, online 1 week classroom SYS 302 Technical Leadership in Systems Engineering SYS 203 Intermediate Systems Planning, Research, Development and Engineering, Part II P 25 hrs, online 35 hrs, online P CLE 003 Technical Reviews Two 100 level DAU courses from among PM, T&E, PQM, LCL, BCFM, IT or CON career fields 10 days classroom Two 100 level DAU courses from among PM, T&E, PQM, LCL, BCFM, IT or CON career fields 5 days classroom The DAU’s Learning Capabilities and Integration Center (LCIC) includes program directors for each career field. These recognized experts of the LCIC look across the entire curricula in each career field to ensure appropriate content, sequencing, and delivery. They closely interact with the DoD AT&L career field Functional Advisors and Functional Integrated Process Teams, who establish career field competencies, to develop training course content. They also work closely with the office of the USD (AT&L), Federal Agencies and industry to capture the latest initiatives and best practices and disseminate information to the workforce by a variety of means (e.g., the AKSS and various Communities of Practices [COPs] and Special Interest Areas [SIAs]). This chart shows the Core and Core Plus training requirements for SPRDE: Systems Engineer Career Track established by the SPRDE career field Functional Advisor. Notes on the new SPRDE:PSE career field All current SPRDE Careerists grandfathered into the SPRDE: SE Career Field Career management offices to evaluate all SPRDE: positions and recode as necessary to SPRDE: Program Systems Engineer (10-15% recode estimate) Implementation of the more stringent SPRDE: Program System Engineer career path up to service and agency discretion on position-by-position basis Should you require further information please contact: [(703) ] (Choose the chart most appropriate for the class you are teaching and focus on it, rather than brief in detail all Career Field charts; also note to the students that the online DAU Catalog, Appendix B always has the latest information in this area. For SYS classes, use both SPRDE: SE and SPRDE PSE charts) One 100 or 200 level DAU course from among PM, T&E, PQM, LCL, BCFM, IT or CON career fields Two 200 or 300 level DAU courses from among PM, T&E, PQM, LCL, BCFM, IT or CON career fields LOG 204 Configuration Management 15 hrs, online Knowledge based GS 5-9 & E7-O3 Application/case based GS 9-12 & E7-O4 Case/scenario based GS & E7-O5 Level I “Core Plus” Courses & CL Modules (See DAU catalog for details) Level II “Core Plus” Courses & CL Modules (See DAU catalog for details) Level III “Core Plus” Courses & CL Modules (See DAU catalog for details) Vers 8.1

11 DAU Strategic Partnerships
Credit for DAU courses toward degrees & certificates at colleges and universities Shorter time to get your degree Saves tuition assistance and out-of-pocket expenses “Excelerate” Your Master’s Degree… Excelerate is an exciting new program where you can earn your master’s degree in less time. Through this program, several universities are offering the AT&L workforce credit toward masters degrees for DAWIA Level II and III certification.* As the DoD AT&L workforce has evolved, so have our customers’ learning needs. To create new and expanded career-long learning solutions for the workforce, DAU has continued to actively foster synergistic and mutually beneficial arrangements with academic institutions, industry, professional organizations and other government agencies nation-wide. These partnerships allow us to leverage training and research resources within other organizations as well as tap into outside expertise for curriculum development and evaluation. This greatly increases the value of DAU courses with little or no capital investment. Our partnerships with universities allow the workforce to receive credit toward certificates, bachelor degrees, and masters degrees for courses taken at DAU. Additionally, many of these partnerships open the doors for joint research on topics of interest to the DoD AT&L community and for collaboration in curriculum development. The alliances with academia have three strong results: They provide the AT&L workforce with opportunities to leverage their DAU courses toward more quickly earning degrees or professional certificates. They allow AT&L workforce members who have obtained degrees from institutions with whom DAU has equivalency agreements to receive credit for completion of DAU training courses. They create more opportunities for AT&L workforce members to meet their continuous learning requirements. The DAU homepage has a searchable database that allows them to quickly find institutions that will accept credit for DAU courses. *DAWIA course and masters programs vary More information on DAU’s partnership program can be found at: 11

12 DAU Learning Assets at: www.dau.mil
DAU Training Courses Performance Support Continuous Learning Center https://learn.dau.mil/html/clc/Clc.jsp AT&L Knowledge Sharing System (AKSS) Webcast/Podcast Center DAU Acker Library This chart shows the screen captures of key DAU web pages.

13 DAU’s Commitment to the DoD AT&L Workforce
Training - 24 / 7 learning assets: in the classroom and in the workplace Continuous Learning - Helping you learn in the workplace: what you need to know , when you need to know it Performance Support - Supporting your organization Knowledge Sharing - Connecting you – the Engaged Learner - with the experts, resources and materials you need to do your job Close the presentation by emphasizing the power of the AT&L Performance Learning Model and the variety of learning assets it makes available to them. Even when they graduate from the course they are currently taking, DAU is just a “click” or phone call away. We are their career-long university. Shaping a culture of engagement and career-long learning 13

14 The Current Event slides I have provided are FYI and use.
The instructor must cover any T&E relevant Current Events with the students. There are ELOs/TLOs that require we present T&E relevant current events. TLO#3: Given DoD guidance, examine T&E policy for all changes in terms, phases and concepts. The Current Event slides I have provided are FYI and use. Instructors are encouraged to develop/use their own T&E related Current Events slides for their classes and update them in a timely manner. If Internet access is available to the instructor, suggest you take the students quickly through the ACC T&E Special Interest Area, with a quick look at Tools and one/two areas of interest to the students, for their familiarization with the site. ELO # 3.1 and 3.2

15 LtGen Henry Obering III
Honorable John J. Young, Jr. Dr John Foulkes LtGen Henry Obering III Vacant This slide shows the AT&L Organization. Instructors should draw attention to some of the offices that are directly involved with T&E. (see highlighted areas)

16 DOD T&E Organization SecDef DepSecDef Others Congress GAO USD(C) USD(AT&L) ASD(NII) DOT&E Test Resource Mgt Center PA&E DDR&E DISA Dir, Sys & SW Engr. JITC Dir, Systems & Mission Integration Dir, Systems Acquisition Dir, Systems Engineering Sec Army ASA (ALT) ASN (RD&A) Sec Navy USCINCSOC Sec AF Army T&E Executive ASAF(AQ) SOAE SOJ3 Commandant, Marine Corps Chief of Naval Ops C of S, Army TEMA N091 C of S, AF PEOs/PMs AF/TE An overview of the DoD T&E organization for review with the students JITC is considered an OTA, along with ATEC, MCOTEA, OPTEVFOR and AFOTEC. Army Material Command (AMC) Army Test and Evaluation Command (ATEC) Marine Corps Systems Command (MARCORSYSCOM) Marine Corps Operational Test and Evaluation Activity (MCOTEA) Navy Systems Commands (SPAWAR) (NAVAIR) (NAVSEA) Operational Test and Evaluation Force (OPTEVFOR) Air Force Material Command (AFMC) Air Force Operational Test and Evaluation Center (AFOTEC) DTC OTC AEC NOTE: Other Defense Components (e.g. DFAS, DLA, DISA, etc..) are also subject to rules and regulations governing T&E 14 14 14 14 10 10 10 14 14 14

17 Information as of January 2008
Daly, Crisp, Blann, McCarthy, and Sayre, all carry the title of Deputy Director. Dr. Charles McQueary was appointed DOT&E in July He succeeds Thomas Christie (Philip Coyle was the Director before Christie), who retired in 2005. McQueary is a former senior advisor to the Under Secretary for Science and Technology, Department of Homeland Security. (Where Gordon England knew him) Before becoming a senior advisor at DHS, he was the agency’s Under Secretary for Science and Technology. (The above information on McQueary obtained from Defense AT&L Magazine, September-October 2006 edition, page 87) The Net-Centric & Space Systems Directorate was formed late 2007.

18 Kristen Baldwin (Acting) SES
Systems & Software Engineering Organizational Core Competencies Director, Systems & Software Engineering Kristen Baldwin (Acting) SES Deputy Director Enterprise Development Nic Torelli SES Deputy Director Developmental Test & Evaluation Chris DiPetto SES Deputy Director Software Engineering & System Assurance Bruce Amato (Acting) SES Deputy Director Assessments & Support Glyn James (Acting) SES CORE COMPETENCIES SE Policy SE Guidance SE in Defense Acquisition Guidebook Technical Planning Risk Management Reliability & Maintainability Contracting for SE SoS SE Guide SE Education and Training DAU SE Curriculum SPRDE Certification Reqt Special Initiatives Corrosion RTOC VE CORE COMPETENCIES DT&E Policy DT&E Guidance T&E in Defense Acquisition Guidebook TEMP Development Process DT&E Education and Training DAU DT&E Curriculum DT&E Certification Reqt Joint Testing, Capabilities & Infrastructure Targets Oversight Modeling & Simulation Acquisition System Safety CORE COMPETENCIES SWE and SA Policy Guidance SoS, SA Guides Education and Training DAU SW Acq Curriculum Continuous Learning Modules for SW, SoS, SA Software Engineering Acquisition Support Software Engineering Institute (SEI) Process Improvement CMMI DoD/National Software Investment Strategy Industrial Base capability CORE COMPETENCIES Support of ACAT I and other special interest programs (MDAP, MAIS) Assessment Methodology (Defense Acquisition Program Support – DAPS) T&E Oversight and Assessment of Operational Test Readiness (AOTR) SE/T&E Review of Defense Acquisition Executive Summary Assessments (DAES) Lean/6-Sigma Training/Cert The point to emphasize from this slide is that TES and TEMP review and AT&L DT assistance comes from the Deputy Director, Assessments & Support Organization (see Red Highlighted area); not from the Developmental Test & Evaluation Organization (see Green Highlighted Area). The DT&E organization is primarily concerned with DT policy and guidance. Acquisition program excellence through sound systems and software engineering

19 DoD AT&L Workforce Career Fields (13) ARMY NAVY/USMC AIR FORCE OTHER
TOTAL Auditing 2 3,485 3,487 Business, Cost Estimating, & Financial Management 4,171 1,716 1,503 218 7,608 Contracting 10,042 5,018 7,371 5,314 27,745 Facilities Engineering 441 3,477 9 3,927 Industrial/Contract Property Management 125 56 27 321 529 Information Technology 2,733 744 1,116 248 4,841 Life Cycle Logistics 6,319 4,154 1,781 76 12,330 Production, Quality, and Manufacturing 2,193 2,000 334 4,439 8,966 Program Management 4,475 3,624 3,958 717 12,774 Purchasing 332 555 123 667 1,677 SPRDE - S & T Manager 171 19 100 290 SPRDE - Systems Engineering 11,964 16,690 6,239 253 35,146 Test and Evaluation (5.6%) 2,140 2,446 2,598 94 7,278 Unknown 506 6 1,132 1,644 Total 45,443 40,651 25,075 17,073 128,242 Chart was extracted from a presentation by George Prosnik, DAU Off-Site, October 3, 2007.

20 DoD AT&L Workforce Test & Evaluation Functional Area – Age
T&E Workforce Component MIL CIV Air Force Army Navy 4th Estate Additional information obtained from the Larry Leiby presentation, September 11, (See previous slide notes.)

21 Government Oversight Pendulum
Auth. Bill SE Emphasis From the early 1990s to the present, the government oversight pendulum swung from detailed Milspecs and SOWs that were highly directive in nature to SOOs and performance specifications which allowed contractors much more freedom to determine how to deliver the needed capability and much more control over systems engineering and integration. Another significant change during this timeframe was the movement of the government away from serving as the system integrator and turning that role (especially for systems of systems integrations) over to a Lead System Integrator (LSI). More recently, however, Congress and the Department of Defense have become less enamored of the LSI concept and have attempted to reestablish rigorous oversight of acquisition efforts, especially in the systems engineering arena (SEP and Chief Engineer Requirements) More Guidance and Oversight: MILSPECS SOW Government is the Integrator Less Guidance and Oversight: Performance Specs SOO Prime Contractor is the Integrator (LSI)

22 Bill Would Bar Contractors from Running Defense Programs
Main Provisions from the 2008 Defense Authorization Bill Passed by the HASC No more Lead System Integrators (LSIs) after 2011 DoD directed to study its acquisition workforce and identify and fill gaps in skills needed to effectively manage programs Current LSI managed programs not effected unless opened up to competitive bid

23 Current Programs Managed by Lead System Integrators
Ground Based Midcourse Defense Boeing Future Combat System Boeing/SAIC Littoral Combat Ship Lockheed Martin Coast Guard Deepwater Modernization Lockheed Martin/Northrop Grumman From Defense News, 23 April 2007: SECNAV on 2 April blasted his contractors and said the Navy must manage its warship programs directly. One week later, SECNAV cancelled one of Lockheed Martin’s two Littoral Combat Ships as punishment for being behind schedule and over budget. PM was replaced. Mid April-Coast Guard Commandant “demoted” Lockheed Martin and Northrup Grumman as LSIs’ for the Coast Guard’s Deepwater effort.

24 JCIDS Publications May 1, 2007
CJCSI F (JCIDS) CJCSM C (Documents) Key Performance Parameters Force Protection & Survivability (Req) Sustainment (Materiel Availability)(Req) NR-KPP (Req) System Training (Selectively Applied) Energy Efficiency (Selectively Applied) The Force Protection & Survivability and NR-KPP have been in effect for some time. The Sustainment and System Training were added by JROC memo in August 2006 and March (See the following two slides) The Energy Efficiency was added with the May 1, 2007 change. Like the System Training KPP, it is to be selectively applied. (The sponsor will perform an analysis on the use of the parameter as a KPP.) The CJCSM C states: Include fuel efficiency considerations for fleet purchases and operational plans consistent with mission accomplishment. Life-cycle cost analysis will include the fully burdened cost of fuel during the AoA and subsequent analyses and acquisition program design trades. The fully burdened cost of fuel includes the price of the fuel delivery chain (to include force protection requirements.)

25 Key System Attribute (KSA)
Those system attributes considered most critical or essential for an effective military capability but not selected as a KPP KSAs provide decision makers with an additional level of capability prioritization below the KPP But with senior sponsor leadership control Generally 4-star, Defense Agency Commander or Principal Staff Assistant Extracted from the CJCSM C, 1 May 2007, Enclosure B, Paragraph 1e, Page B-2.

26 A View From the Top We tend to chase technology
90% of the work is in the first 10% of System Development The Dir, DOT&E wants DOT&E more involved with DT where he feels we have a lack of government oversight. These comments were made by Mr. Mike Crisp, Deputy Director, Air Warfare Directorate, DOT&E; during a TST 301 Video Teleconference on February 15, 2007, at the Joint Interoperability Test Command. First bullet: We tend to make the technology the requirement! Third Bullet: As an example, he stated that there is currently, an ACAT I Program Shop with only four government personnel in it (the PM, DPM, Contracting Officer, Secretary) and their program reflects that lack of government involvement. In general, we suffer from a lack of government DT. Mr. Steve Daly, Deputy Director, Ground Warfare Directorate, DOT&E, during a VTC at Edwards AFB, January 2007 provided the following comments. The Dir, DOT&E wants more realistic DT; more rigor! Operational Suitability is poor/lagging, when compared to operational effectiveness. We need to raise awareness on Operational Suitability and get it back to an acceptable level.

27 Defense Science Board Task Force on DT&E
AT&L memo, April 30, 2007, request Examine… OSD organization, roles & repsonsibilities for T&E oversight (compare DT&E to OT&E; changes?) Changes required to establish statutory authority for OSD DT&E oversight Recommend improvements in DT&E process to discover suitability problems early Mr Charles Adolph – Chair the Task Force Mr Chris DiPetto (ODUSD (A&T) and Dr Ernest Seglie (ODOT&E), Executive Secretaries AT&L Memo (from Mr Kreig) dated April 30, 2007, in instructor reference material. “Approximately 50% of program entering IOT&E in recent years have not been evaluated as Operationally Effective and Operationally Suitable. The IOT&E failures suggest deficiencies in DT&E process. I request the Defense Science Board establish a task force to examine T&E roles and responsibilities, policy and practices and recommend changes that may contribute to improved success in IOT&E along with quicker delivery of improved capability and sustainability to War fighters.” (Excerpt from the first paragraph of the memo.)

28 Reliability Availability and Maintainability (RAM) Findings
Acquisition Reform implementation had a detrimental impact on RAM practices With some exceptions, the practice of reliability growth methodologies was discontinued during System Design and Development (SDD) and deferred until production Relevant military specifications and standards were cancelled and not, in all cases, replaced with industry standards The technical/managerial workforce was reduced in most government program offices and test organizations RAM shortfalls are frequently identified during DT, but program constraints (schedule and funding) often preclude incorporating fixes and delaying IOT&E In some instances, programs had such serious RAM concerns that they were precluded from proceeding to production until the problems could be corrected. Improved RAM decreases life cycle costs and reduces demand on the logistics system

29 Impact of Low Reliability on Life Cycle Cost (LCC)
Recent Logistics Management Institute (LMI) and Army studies investigated relationship between reliability and Life Cycle Cost (LCC). Both studies concluded that reliability investment during design and development reduces support cost LMI study concludes that: 30-60% reduction in support cost is achievable Reacting to lower reliability after IOC (vice during development) results in significant support cost increases OSD CAIG study shows that support costs are two-thirds or more of total system cost DoD should address acquisition and LCC strategies concurrently Support cost bill payers should participate in requirements definition and trade studies during development Upfront Investment in Robust RAM Effort Emphasizing Reliability Growth Reduces Life Cycle Costs

30 RAM Recommendations The single most important step necessary to correct high suitability failure rates is to ensure programs are formulated to execute a viable systems engineering strategy from the beginning, including a robust RAM program, as an integral part of design and development. No amount of testing will compensate for deficiencies in RAM program formulation. To this end, the following RAM-related actions are required as a minimum: Identify and define RAM requirements during the Joint Capabilities Integration Development System (JCIDS) process and incorporate them into the Request for Proposal (RFP) and as a mandatory contractual requirement During source selection, evaluate the bidders’ approaches to satisfying RAM requirements Ensure flow-down of RAM requirements to subcontractors Make RAM, to include a robust reliability growth program, a mandatory contractual requirement and document progress as a part of every major program review Develop a military standard for consistent RAM development and testing that can be readily referenced in future DoD contracts Ensure an adequate cadre of experienced RAM personnel are part of the Service acquisition and engineering office staffs

31 Roles and Responsibilities of Government T&E Organizations Findings
The aggregate lack of process guidance due to the elimination of specifications and standards, massive workforce reductions in acquisition and test personnel, and the high retirement rate of the most experienced technical and managerial personnel in government and industry has a major negative impact on DoD's ability to successfully execute increasingly complex acquisition programs. Major personnel reductions have strained the pool of experienced government test personnel A significant amount of developmental testing is currently performed without the needed degree of government involvement or oversight and in some cases, with limited government access to contractor data The current trend away from governmental involvement in DT makes operationally oriented testing in some areas during development even more difficult to accomplish

32 Roles and Responsibilities of Government T&E Organizations Recommendations
As a minimum, government test organizations should retain a cadre of T&E personnel to perform the following functions: Participate in the translation of operational requirements into contract specifications, and in the source selection process, including RFP preparation Participate in developmental test and evaluation planning including TEMP preparation and approval Participate in the technical review process including SRR, PDR,CDR, TRR and FRR Participate in test conduct, data analysis, and evaluation and reporting, with emphasis on analysis and reporting Capture and re-apply best practices and lessons learned

33 Integrated Test and Evaluation Findings
Service acquisition programs are incorporating integrated testing to a limited degree through varying approaches  Army has integrated DT and OT organizations into one command Navy utilizes a full-spectrum RDT&E approach to conducting Test & Evaluation Air Force employs Combined Test Force concept which consolidates test execution Additional emphasis on integrated testing can result in greater T&E process efficiency and program cost reductions

34 Integrated Test and Evaluation Recommendations
Implement OSD policy change mandating integrated DT&E and OT&E planning and execution throughout the program Require sharing and access to all appropriate system-level and selected component-level test and model data by government DT and OT organizations as well as the prime contractor, where appropriate Incorporate data access requirements in contract Integrate test events, where practical, to satisfy OT and DT requirements Define which testing will be accomplished by the prime contractor, government DT lead, and OT as the lead agency prior to award of contract Require an operational evaluation framework as a part of the Milestone B TEMP Make available a cadre of operational personnel to support DT for Acquisition Category (ACAT I) and special interest programs, as a minimum Better integrate Operational Test Agencies (OTAs) into the DR process to include participation on Joint Reliability Maintainability Evaluation Team (JRMET) or Corrective Action Review Board throughout DT

35 Operational Test Readiness Review (OTRR) Findings
DoDI requires that “the Service Acquisition Executive (SAE) shall evaluate and determine materiel system readiness for IOT&E" For all Services, the OTRR process is an in-depth review of readiness Decision authority is frequently delegated to the Program Executive Officer (PEO) Shortcomings in system performance, suitability, and RAM are usually identified during the OTRR In most cases, the operational test readiness certifying authority is aware of the risk of not meeting OT criteria when major shortcomings exist Because of the funding constraints, the low priority given to sustainment, as well as the urgency in recent years to get new capabilities to the Warfighter, major suitability shortcomings have rarely delayed the commencement of dedicated IOT&E

36 OTRR Recommendations Conduct periodic operational assessments to evaluate progress potential for achieving pre-determined entrance criteria for operational test events Conduct an independent AOTR prior to the OTRR (included in latest draft DODI ) for oversight programs Results of the AOTR should be briefed at the OTRR Include a detailed RAM template in preparation for the OTRR CAE submit a report to OSD that provides the rationale for the readiness decision Include an evaluation of weapon system’s capabilities against Critical Operational Issues (COIs) Certify that the DT evaluation is complete and indicates acceptable risk of passing OT Include an explanation for recommending go-ahead when there is a reasonable expectation that the system is not effective and/or suitable  DT&E Task Force Strongly Endorses Recent AT&L/DOT&E Initiative to Strengthen OSD OTRR Process

37 OSD DT&E Organization Recommendations
The most important change required for improved OSD DT oversight is to is to reestablish a recognizable, focused, integrated, and robust DT organization within AT&L Consolidate DT-related functions in AT&L * Program oversight and policy, and Foreign Comparative Test Have Director, DT&E directly report to DUSD(A&T) Restore TEMP approval authority to Director, DT&E  Integrate Test Resource Management Center (TRMC) activities early into DT program planning *Three Task Force members out of fourteen voted against consolidation

38 Reliability Improvement Working Group
DUSD(A&T) and DOT&E memo signed February 15, 2008 requests CAE support to establish a working group to implement recommendations to improve RAM on DoD weapon systems during system development Specific Tasks: Ensure execution of a viable SE strategy , including RAM growth program, as an integral part of design and development Ensure government orgs reconstitute cadre of experienced T&E and RAM personnel Implement mandated Integrated DT and OT, ensure access to all appropriate data (contractor and government) and conduct T&E in an operationally representative environment as early as possible

39 http://www.acq.osd.mil/ dsb/reports/2008-05-DTE.pdf
The entire DSB report is available at: dsb/reports/ DTE.pdf

40 Continuous Process Improvement (CPI)
Establishment of AT&L Continuous Process Improvement (CPI) Program To help optimize our organizational performance To establish a basic understanding of various CPI principles and roles, all AT&L personnel had to complete CLE 015 (CPI Continuous Learning Module) before March 30, 2007. The Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology and Logistics, Memorandum dated February 9, 2007. AT&L “wants to create a culture more supportive of the war fighter by implementing CPI consistent with our strategic goals.” Dr George Ka’Iliwai, III, Technical Advisor at Edwards AFB, at a January 2007, TST 301 Guest Speaker appearance said that lean, through the use of Value Mapping, was used extensively in F-22 testing at Edwards AFB. In the rear of Lesson 1 in the Student Book is a Lean Tool Comparison Chart, extracted from the CLE 015, for the Student’s future reference.

41 Prototyping & Competition
Many programs initiated with inadequate technology maturity Program decisions based on paper proposals There is a need for & benefits of quality prototyping Issues need to be discovered before SD&D phase Acquisition strategies requiring AT&L approval must be formulated to include competitive, technically mature prototyping through Milestone B Extracted from a Mr. John Young, USD AT&L Memo, Dated 19 September 2007 (Memo is in Instructor Material) Many troubled programs share common traits – the programs were initiated with inadequate technology maturity and an elementary understanding of the critical program development path. Program decisions were based largely on paper proposals. Lessons of the past emphasize the need for and benefits of, quality prototyping. The Department needs to discover issues before the costly SD&D phase. Military Services and defense Agencies will formulate all pending and future programs with acquisition strategies and funding that provide for two or more competing teams producing prototypes through Milestone B. All acquisition strategies requiring USD(AT&L) approval must be formulated to include competitive, technically mature prototyping through Milestone B. It is the policy of the DoD that this acquisition strategy should be extended to all appropriate programs below ACAT 1.

42 Resources OSD SSE: http://www.acq.osd.mil/sse/
OSD SE Pubs: ASSIST: NAVAIR Tech Reviews: Army LSS: USAF SE:

43 Resources (cont) DAU: www.dau.mil DAU SE: https://acc.dau.mil/se
DAG Chapter 4: https://akss.dau.mil/dag/Guidebook/IG_c4.0.asp DAU Cont Learning: DAU Training: AMRDEC:

44 Questions? Wallace J. “Wally” Tubell Professor of Engineering
DAU South


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