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Delivering Success For Your College Through International Skills Partnerships 27 and 28 June 2013.

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Presentation on theme: "Delivering Success For Your College Through International Skills Partnerships 27 and 28 June 2013."— Presentation transcript:

1 Delivering Success For Your College Through International Skills Partnerships 27 and 28 June 2013

2 Overview of the Day 1025–1125 Session 1: Introduction to International Skills Partnerships 1140–1300 Session 2: Getting Started 1345–1425 Session 3: Making a Success of Your International Skills Partnership 1425–1520 Session 4: International Skills Partnership Opportunities 1520–1600 Questions and Discussion

3 Objectives By the end of the workshop you will have gained an understanding of: what benefits can be delivered by international skills partnerships the different kind of partnerships and the processes involved how to write a strong application for a travel grant how to write a strong project proposal what makes a good partnership specific partnership opportunities what your organisations next steps might be the support and guidance available to take your partnership work forward

4 Introductions

5 Session 1 Introduction to International Skills Partnerships

6 What are international skills partnerships? Pre-commercial output-focussed partnerships between consortia of institutions in the UK and counterparts overseas that pilot new approaches to furthering skills development and employability Typically funded for 12 months, typically funded to around £15000 Emphasis on sharing knowledge and experience Project plan with clear deliverables Priority sectors and themes Managed, supported and evaluated by British Council Integrated partnership approach Key aims: innovation, mutuality, impact, sustainability Since 2008, British Council has facilitated some 70 partnerships with over 30 countries

7 What are international skills partnerships not? Generally a one-to-one, college-to-college partnership Short-term Generally a quick win A low maintenance, marginal activity About student recruitment Primarily about cultural relations Primarily about mobility Inward-looking, impacting on only those directly involved About gaining advantage over other colleges in a limited international market

8 Exercise: Benefits Working in groups please share your colleges motivations in considering engaging in international skills partnerships

9 Benefits Motivate and capacity-build students and staff Enrich your colleges culture Enhance your colleges profile and reputation, in the UK and internationally Enhance your colleges approach to skills development, including in the area of curriculum development, quality assurance and employer engagement, across different thematic areas and sectors Build relationships with other organisations including employers in the UK and internationally Build a strong presence and rewarding presence in the partner country Identify new business opportunities Contribute to the development of skills and employability in the UK and the partner country

10 International skills partnerships are the most effective kind of staff development in the world. Joanne Wallace, Head of International Collaboration and Partnerships, Bradford College

11 International partnerships are the future of education. Careers will be global, so gaining cultural appreciation is hugely beneficial to my students. Marion Plant Principal North Warwickshire and Hinkley College

12 British Council has truly helped us to develop on a global basis. Sanjeev Ohri, Director of Worldwide Operations, Dudley College

13 What is British Councils role? Liaises with governments to identify priorities and design appropriate specifications for partnerships Initiates, facilitates, monitors and evaluates partnership projects Provides expert feedback and guidance on partnership performance Provides partners with information about country contexts and introductions to key stakeholders Facilitates mutually beneficial links between different partnerships Facilitates linkages between partnership work and policy development Promotes the work of partnerships and helps disseminate results Recognises and rewards excellence in partnership work

14 What is the key goal of British Council partnerships? Promoting higher quality skills development that meets industry needs and helps young people to prosper. This is tied up with developing closer links between education, employers and policy makers.

15 What outcomes is British Council looking for from its partnerships? An active network of local and global employers, employer representative organisations and other skills stakeholders is established Knowledge and understanding of effective approaches to skills development is improved Young people are better prepared for the world of work and enterprise Understanding and recognition of the benefits of working internationally and how to do this effectively is increased New approaches to skills development are implemented at institution/ organisation level Policy changes and/or new approaches to skills development are implemented at national and/or system level Higher quality skills that meet industry needs are developed.

16 Successful partnerships: Case study 1 A partnership that has led to ground-breaking taster courses being introduced in the partner country, allowing students to experience different courses before selecting the most appropriate one for them, helping to ensure that students embark on the right training path first time

17 Successful partnerships: Case study 2 A partnership that has led to an innovative new entrepreneurship curriculum being implemented in the UK and the partner county across a range of subjects, building on students natural creativity to help them develop a strong practical enterprising outlook and enhance their employability

18 Successful partnerships: Case study 3 A partnership that has led to the partners going on to develop a successful joint enterprise company, winning contracts valued at £1m to date, and ensuring the long-term sustainability of the partnership

19 Successful partnerships: Case study 4 A partnership that has informed the national strategy on quality assurance in skills in the partner country, leading to quality assurance processes being rolled out to technical training institutions across the country, improving the quality training of hundreds of thousands of young people

20 Case study: Dudley College and Technical Institute of Yemen Sanjeev Ohri, Director of Worldwide Operations, Dudley College

21 Bradford College British Council projects: IMPACT Bradford College has undertaken 18 projects in 5 years in 11 countries Definition of impact: the action of one object coming forcibly into contact with another! or marked effect or influence Internal impact (organisation) Internationalisation: CPD/Curriculum Development e.g Film School/Student Exchange/Commercial Spin-offs/CV Building External impact (where we fit) Policy change/reform: Skills/UK plc/Education Exports - short term window?

22 International Skills Partnerships The Process

23 Partnership process Designed in close consultation with the skills sector Detailed review over 18 months, including seminars focused on international skills partnerships Built on experience of over 5 years, 70+ partnerships, 30+ countries Led to a new partnership strategy Key features include flexibility, facilitation of networking, more effective monitoring and support

24 Advanced Partnership Start-up Partnership Foundation Partnership

25 Advanced Partnership Start-up Partnership Foundation Partnership

26 Foundation partnership projects: initiation phase Travel grant agreement Call announced in UK Briefing workshops Travel grant application Assessment panel Travel grant funding is released Initial visit Proposal Assessment panel Partnership grant agreement Partnership grant instalment 1 Facilitated video- conference

27 Foundation partnership projects: delivery phase Partnership visits Ongoing communication Ongoing collaboration Ongoing M&E Interim report Partnership grant instalment 2

28 Foundation partnership projects: delivery phase Partnership visits Ongoing communication Ongoing collaboration Ongoing M&E Final report Partnership grant instalment 3

29 Foundation partnership projects: post-delivery Advanced partnership application Impact follow-up

30 Advanced Partnership Start-up Partnership Foundation Partnership

31 Start-up partnership projects: initiation phase Partnership grant agreement Partnership grant instalment 1 Organisations approach prospective partners Partnership opportunity is announced in both countries Assessment panel Proposal

32 Start-up partnership projects: delivery phase Partnership visits Ongoing communication Ongoing collaboration Ongoing M&E Interim report Partnership grant instalment 2

33 Start-up partnership projects: delivery phase Partnership visits Ongoing communication Ongoing collaboration Ongoing M&E Final report Partnership grant instalment 3

34 Start-up partnership projects: post-delivery Advanced partnership application Impact follow-up

35 Advanced Partnership Start-up Partnership Foundation Partnership

36 Advanced partnership projects: initiation phase Partnership grant agreement Proposal Assessment panel Partnership grant instalment 1

37 Advanced partnership projects: delivery phase Partnership visits Ongoing communication Ongoing collaboration Ongoing M&E Interim report Partnership grant instalment 2

38 Advanced partnership projects: delivery phase Partnership visits Ongoing communication Ongoing collaboration Ongoing M&E Final report Partnership grant instalment 3

39 Advanced partnership projects: post-delivery Impact follow-up

40 Miranda Swanson Skills Partnerships Manager British Council +44 (0) 7901 104404 miranda.swanson@britishcouncil.org www.britishcouncil.org/skillsforemployability miranda.swanson@britishcouncil.org www.britishcouncil.org/skillsforemployability

41 Session 2 Embarking on a Partnership

42 Things to consider before applying for a partnership Does your college have a fit-for-purpose international strategy? How does an international skills partnership cohere with your colleges international strategy? What benefits does your college aim to get out of a partnership? Which countries do you want to work with? And which do you not want to work with? Can your college spend the necessary staff time on a proposal, partnership and related work? Which staff would be involved? Can you source any additional external funding to support the partnership? What other organisations can you involve in the partnership, both as partners and supporters, and what can they add?

43 Developing An Effective Travel Grant Application

44 Travel grant application Form Guidelines Assessment grid

45 Travel Grant Application – Assessment criteria Evidence that the applicant organisation could involve a range of stakeholders Previous experience of international collaborative work or transferrable skills The extent to which the preparatory activity reflects a sound, well researched approach The extent to which the initial project ideas are realistic, imaginative and achievable; the extent to which they develop previous work and contain something new.

46 Travel Grant Application – Organisation details Key point: Your application will be strengthened if you demonstrate an ability to involve a number of other organisations in the prospective partnership

47 Travel Grant Application – Experience Key point: Describe your institutions relevant experience and explain how this would help you to lead an effective skills partnership.

48 Travel Grant Application – Preparatory activity Key point: Demonstrate that you have done the necessary groundwork.

49 Travel Grant Application – Overview of initial ideas Key point: Demonstrate that you have a good understanding of partnership working.

50 Exercise: Travel Grant Applications Working in groups please compare the two examples of a section of a travel grant application. Please a) identify which is successful and which is unsuccessful and b) list three specific points for comparison.

51 Developing An Effective Partnership Proposal

52 What are the key features of a successful partnership? Delivers planned outputs Creates impact that benefits significant numbers of people in key target audiences Outward-looking, engaging other stakeholders, including employers and policy-makers and other partnerships Focused on sustainability from the start Is ambitious and energetic, responsive to new opportunities, including business opportunities Communicates effectively, both between partner organisations and with British Council Publicises the partnership and its project effectively from the start Disseminates the results of the partnership project effectively

53 What are common reasons for a partnership proposal being rejected? Generic and lacking innovation Too inward focussed Lack of clarity Dont meet British Council objectives Over-promising Lack of mutuality Lack of country context Lack of consideration of sustainability Unambitious, with limited, low level of impact Excessive focus on mobility and intercultural dialogue Lack of value for money

54 Start-up Partnerships – How to lay the foundations In-country contacts – you need a partner Employer contacts and broader network Business visits to the country including meeting with British Council Online research Media Partnerships already working in the country Conferences and seminars Foundation partnership calls and related briefings British Council skills newsletter

55 Partnership Proposal - Key documents Form Guidelines Assessment grid

56 Partnership Proposal - Context Designed to be clear and step-by-step Reflective of impactful, output-focussed partnerships that British Council now facilitates Full guidelines detailing whats needed in each section, plus an assessment grid for reference Only one section requires a full page - most paragraphs or tables Bullet points can be used, word limits are maximums Designed to provide framework for discussions with partners and to be completed by partners together Developing a partnership requires commitment from the partners and British Council Solid proposal provides foundation for strong partnership and success Six monthly review and where required revision of documentation

57 Partnership Proposal - Organisation details Key point: Include a number of partners, ideally including the relevant sector skills organisation in the UK and employer

58 Partnership Proposal - Preparatory activity Key point: Demonstrate that you have thought the proposal through with your partners and done the necessary groundwork

59 Partnership Proposal - Funding identified Key point: Your proposal will be strengthened if you have identified other funding to support the project

60 Partnership Proposal - Project overview Key point: Sell the project idea

61 Partnership Proposal - Project rationale Key point: Explain why the project is necessary and valuable, including focus on the country context

62 Partnership Proposal - Project summary Key point: Set out the activities, deliverables and impact - this section is of crucial importance

63 Partnership Proposal - Roles and responsibilities Key point: All participating organisations should be represented

64 Partnership Proposal - Extending other partnership work Key point: Your proposal will be strengthened if you show you have considered other projects

65 Partnership Proposal - Employers and other stakeholders Key point: Demonstrate that you have engaged stakeholders beyond the partnership

66 Partnership Proposal - Sustainability Key point: Demonstrate that you are approaching the sustainability of the partnership in a practical and proactive way

67 Partnership Proposal - Maximising impact Key point: Demonstrate that you have thought about the impact of the project and have strong practical ideas to maximise it

68 Partnership Proposal - Reach Key point: Targets should be ambitious but credible in all participating countries

69 Partnership Proposal - Publicity Key point: Demonstrate that you will publicise the partnership creatively and effectively

70 Partnership Proposal - Dissemination Key point: Ensure sufficient effort on dissemination at the close the project

71 Partnership Proposal - Communication Key point: Have a clear, thought-out approach to communication

72 Partnership Proposal - Project management Key point: Demonstrate that you have considered the management of the project

73 Partnership Proposal - Partnership networking Key point: Seek to engage with and learn from other partnerships

74 Partnership Proposal - Advanced partnership vision Key point: How might the partnership develop after the first year?

75 Partnership Proposal - Work plan Key point: A break down of all elements of the project - this section is of crucial importance

76 Partnership Proposal - Expenditure Key point: Make sure all items including staff time are calculated realistically

77 Exercise: Benefits Working in groups please review the work plan for the two quarters. How could it be improved?

78 Questions

79 Session 3 Making A Success Of Your Skills Partnership: A Colleges Perspective

80 PLEASE SEE DUDLEY COLLEGE AND BRADFORD COLLEGE PRESENTATIONS

81 Session 4 International Skills Partnership Opportunities

82 China and Vietnam

83 PLEASE SEE CHINA AND VIETNAM OPPORTUNITIES PRESENTATION

84 Opportunities in Middle East and North Africa (MENA)

85 Start-up partnerships Commitment from the region to fund start-up partnership that clearly meet country priorities, are mutually beneficial and will create impact Priority countries: Egypt, Iraq, Libya, Morocco, Tunisia, Yemen

86 Opportunities in Middle East and North Africa (MENA) Foundation partnership Etisalat Academy, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates (UAE) An arm of the telecommunication company, the Etisalat Group Etisalat Academy is the largest single-source provider of training and development solutions in the Middle East. For 30 years we have been providing consultancy and human capital development services to telecoms, government agencies, oil & gas companies, financial institutions and organizations across all industries and business sectors.

87 Opportunities in Middle East and North Africa (MENA) Foundation partnership (cont) Two travel grants of £2000 each Timeline: Call to be announced: w/c 8 July Deadline for travel grant applications: 29 July Assessment panel: 2 August Notification of applicants: 5 August Travel grant payment: 9 August Travel grant visit: September (exact dates tbc) Foundation partnership proposal deadline: End October (exact dates tbc) Partnership project delivery begins and 1 st grant instalment is paid: End November (tbc)

88 International Skills Partnerships web pages www.britishcouncil.org/learning-skills-for-employability-project-skills- partnerships-2.htm

89 Next steps Explore the partnership area of our website and read our General Guidelines Review international strategy with key colleagues and consider how international skills partnerships might fit Discuss partnerships with employers and other external contacts Read our e-newsletters and e-newsflashes for news of new opportunities Consider applying for start-up partnerships Consider applying for foundation partnership with China/UAE Visit colleges already involved in partnerships – ideally during inward visits Contact British Council for guidance

90 Questions

91 Please complete your evaluation forms

92 Neil Shaw neil.shaw@britishcouncil.org Miranda Swanson miranda.swanson@britishcouncil.org Emma Whitehead emma.whitehead@britishcouncil.org Jack Green jack.green@britishcouncil.org www.britishcouncil.org/skillsforemployabilityneil.shaw@britishcouncil.orgmiranda.swanson@britishcouncil.orgemma.whitehead@britishcouncil.orgjack.green@britishcouncil.org www.britishcouncil.org/skillsforemployability

93 Delivering Success For Your College Through International Skills Partnerships 27 and 28 June 2013


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