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IDF Open Meeting 2008: Resource Access for a Digital World International DOI Foundation Brussels, June 17 2008.

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Presentation on theme: "IDF Open Meeting 2008: Resource Access for a Digital World International DOI Foundation Brussels, June 17 2008."— Presentation transcript:

1 IDF Open Meeting 2008: Resource Access for a Digital World International DOI Foundation Brussels, June

2 9.00 Welcome: Jonathan Clark, Chairman IDF ; Serge Brack, OPOCE 9.15 DOI System, Resources, and the Networked Environment Norman Paskin, IDF 9.30 Resource Description and Access for the Digital World Gordon Dunsire, Centre for Digital Library Research, Univ.Strathclyde Enabling Access By Permission Brian Green, Editeur (coffee) Access to Non-textual Information: The Challenge for Libraries Jan Brase, TIB Germany Access to National Resources Jill Cousins, Executive Director, European Digital Library Foundation Panel Discussion: Common Issues and Needs Chris Barlas, Facilitator Buffet Lunch 1.30 Handle System Workshop (CNRI) Resource Access for a Digital World doi>

3 DOI System, Resources, and the Networked Environment International DOI Foundation Norman Paskin IDF Open Meeting: Resource Access for a Digital World Brussels, June

4 2008: tenth anniversary of International DOI Foundation (IDF) 35M+ DOIs, growing applications ISO standardisation – draft international standard Annual meetings – open, themed 2007: Innovative uses of the DOI System 2008: Resource Access for a Digital World the use of identifier systems, in libraries and related areas, to provide persistence and support description and applications across networks. presentations available from IDF Open Meeting 2008 doi>

5 Resource Access for a Digital World doi> DOI conceived as a necessary part of a means of managing content on digital networks –Unique persistent identification –Structured description as a basis for applications DOI system itself does not provide detailed applications –e.g. digital rights management But offers a structured, interoperable basis to build on Build on existing information schemes –Metadata schemes and protocols Build on existing requirements –access, rights management, etc Build on both existing content types and new content types – text, data, images Build on existing standards –components

6 Data ModelResolution Syntax Policies doi>

7 Digital Rights Management: Technical protection measures which use Rights Management Information But: simple management WITHOUT technical protection also needs RMI What is being managed for any rights purpose has to be identified A consistent approach to all kinds of inter-related entities is necessary: An example: Rights control People make Stuff use Deals about do identity management content management license management doi>

8 Describing rights using data How is e.g. a Rights Statement (like a claim) related to a way of identifying something? doi>

9 Describing rights using data Primary rights events (claims, agreements) are described using pieces of data from content, identity and license management domains: Rights Statement (claim): [party] owns [right] in [creation] in [time] and [place] Rights Agreement (deal): [party] agreed with [party] in [time] and [place] that [event] Pieces of "rights metadata" used in each rights statement are things which need to be identified doi>

10 Other pieces of data also need standard identifiers (time, party..) Describing rights using data Primary rights events (claims, deals) are described using pieces of data from all these domains: Rights Statement (claim): [party] owns [right] in [creation] in [time] and [place] Rights Agreement (deal): [party] agreed with [party] in [time] and [place] that [event] Creations typically have standard identifiers, which may have associated structured data, or which may act as keys to get this data doi>

11 Permission: [party] can [verb] [amount] to [creation] at [time] in [place]. Prohibition: [party] cant [verb] to [creation] at [time] in [place]. Requirement: [party] must [verb] [amount] to [creation/party] at [time] in [place]. Rights Transfer: [party] can [grant right] to [party] in [creation] at [time] in [place]. Secondary rights events (licences) are also described using pieces of data: Describing rights using data doi>

12 Describing rights using data Pieces of "rights metadata" used in each rights declaration Permission: [party] can [verb] [amount] to [creation] at [time] in [place]. Prohibition: [party] cant [verb] to [creation] at [time] in [place]. Requirement: [party] must [verb] [amount] to [creation/party] at [time] in [place]. Rights Transfer: [party] can [grant right] to [party] in [creation] at [time] in [place]. doi>

13 What are these pieces of "rights metadata"? A mix of data from many sources: 1 Rights events Statements, agreements, transfers, permissions, prohibitions, requirements, assertions, approvals… 2 Descriptive metadata Creations, creation types, contributor roles, user roles, tools, classifications, measures … Rights, persons, companies, intellectual property, jurisdictions … 3 Legal terms Terms, currencies, conventions… 4 Financial metadata These sets of rights metadata" are standardized and maintained in different places. doi>

14 This mix of data from many sources is used in many different places by different people in chains of rights events: Distributed rights management agreement transfer statement agreement permission prohibition permission assertion agreement requirement etc [party] can [verb] [amount] to [creation] at [time] in [place]. Compound entity can be expanded to reveal more data doi>

15 agreement transfer statement agreement permission prohibition permission assertion agreement requirement etc Each of these is an information object: which needs to be identified (and may be a compound object); which may need to link to or use information objects in other databases; which should be interoperable Distributed rights management doi>

16 DOI services as a future development DOI data types could create a way of processing metadata as a distributed database of services: e.g. Data types (and results) must be consistent, so the DOI data type vocabulary must be developed with great care within a structured content model. Some data types could be application specific. etc.

17 9.00 Welcome: Jonathan Clark, Chairman IDF ; Serge Brack, OPOCE 9.15 DOI System, Resources, and the Networked Environment Norman Paskin, IDF 9.30 Resource Description and Access for the Digital World Gordon Dunsire, Centre for Digital Library Research, Univ.Strathclyde Enabling Access By Permission Brian Green, Editeur Access to Non-textual Information: The Challenge for Libraries Jan Brase, TIB Germany Access to National Resources Jill Cousins, Executive Director, European Digital Library Foundation Panel Discussion: Common Issues and Needs Chris Barlas, Facilitator Buffet Lunch 1.30 Handle System Workshop (CNRI) Resource Access for a Digital World doi>


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