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The Sector Skills Council for the creative and cultural industries Why Sectors Matter The Experience of the UKs Sector Skills Councils Tom Bewick, Chief.

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Presentation on theme: "The Sector Skills Council for the creative and cultural industries Why Sectors Matter The Experience of the UKs Sector Skills Councils Tom Bewick, Chief."— Presentation transcript:

1 The Sector Skills Council for the creative and cultural industries Why Sectors Matter The Experience of the UKs Sector Skills Councils Tom Bewick, Chief Executive, Creative & Cultural Skills Skills Policy Dialogue, Colombo, Sri Lanka 26 th November 2009

2 The Sector Skills Council for the creative and cultural industries Meeting the Sector Skills and Productivity Challenge

3 The Sector Skills Council for the creative and cultural industries

4 The Sector Skills Council for the creative and cultural industries Old Industrial Economy Model 1850s – 1950s Raw Materials Transported Globally Role of Education Physical Commodities Socialisation

5 The Sector Skills Council for the creative and cultural industries New Knowledge Economy Model – Tangible and intangible products Rounded Citizens Ideas and Knowledge Why we need sector skills councils Commercial exploitation Social Good

6 The Sector Skills Council for the creative and cultural industries Productivity is the prime determinant of a nations long- run standard of living, it is the root cause of national per capita income. The productivity of human resources determines employee wages, the productivity with which capital is employed determines the return it earns for its holders. (Michael Porter, Harvard Business Review, March-April 1990)

7 The Sector Skills Council for the creative and cultural industries We must focus not on the economy as a whole [the spatial], but on specific industries and industry segments. (Michael Porter, Harvard Business Review, March-April 1990)

8 The Sector Skills Council for the creative and cultural industries Productivity and employment in OECD countries

9 The Sector Skills Council for the creative and cultural industries 11 th in the world in productivity levels 10 th in employment 14 th in terms of income inequality 17 th on low-level skills 18 th on intermediate level skills 12 th on high-level skills

10 The Sector Skills Council for the creative and cultural industries Unless we act decisively, we will not be in the top eight countries of the world at any skill level.

11 The Sector Skills Council for the creative and cultural industries

12 The Sector Skills Council for the creative and cultural industries Complexity reigns!

13 The Sector Skills Council for the creative and cultural industries AACS: Adult Advancement and Careers Service; AoC: Association of Colleges; ALP: Association of Learning Providers; BCC: British Chambers of Commerce; BERR: Dept of Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform (Now part of DBIS); CIHE: Council for Industry and HE; DBIS: Department for Business, Innovation and Skills; DCLG: Dept for Communities and local Government; DCSF: Dept for Children, Schools and Families; DIUS: Dept for Innovation, Universities and Skills (Now part of DBIS); DWP: Dept for Work and Pensions; ESB: Employment and Skills Boards; FAB: Federation of Awarding Bodies; FdF: Foundation Degree Forward; FSB: Federation of Small Businesses; GO: Government Offices; HEFCE: HE Funding Council for England; IfL: Institute for Learning; JCP: Jobcentre Plus; KTP: Knowledge Transfer Partnership; LA: Local Authority; LEP: Local Employment Partnership; LLN: Lifelong learning Partnership; LSC: Learning and Skills Council; LSIS: Learning and Skills Improvement Service; LSN: Learning and Skills Network; LSP: Local Strategic Partnership; MAA: Multi Area Agreement; NAS: National Apprenticeship Service; NCEE: National Council for Educational Excellence; NES: National Employer Service; NESTA: National Endowment for Science, Technology and Arts; NIACE: National Institute for Adult Continuing Education; NSA: National Skills Academy; OFQUAL: Office of the Qualifications and Exams Regulator; OFSTED: Office for Standards in Education; OLASS: Offender Learning and Skills Service; QCDA: Qualifications and Curriculum Development Agency; RDA: Regional Development Agency; RSP: Regional Skills Partnership; SSC: Sector Skills Council; SFA: Skills Funding Agency; TQS: Training Quality Standard; TSB: Technology Strategy Board; UfI: University for Industry; UKCES: UK Commission for Employment and Skills; YPLA: Young Peoples Learning Agency UK Education and Skills Landscape – Glossary of acronyms

14 The Sector Skills Council for the creative and cultural industries Asset Skills Cogent Creative & Cultural Skills E-Skills UK Energy & Utility Skills Financial Services Go Skills Government Skills IMI Improve Lantra Lifelong Learning UK People 1 st Proskills Semta Skillfast-UK Skills Active Skills for Care & Development Skillset Skills for Health Skills for Justice Skills for Logistics Skillsmart Retail Summit Skills How the skills system relates to Sector Skills Councils

15 The Sector Skills Council for the creative and cultural industries

16 The Sector Skills Council for the creative and cultural industries Raise employer engagement, demand and investment in skills; Ensure authoritative labour market information for their sectors; Develop national occupational standards and ensure qualifications meet employer needs. The core remit of Sector Skills Councils

17 The Sector Skills Council for the creative and cultural industries Sector Skills Councils are unique Uniquely independent and employer-led Uniquely UK-wide, covering 90% of the workforce Uniquely able to respond to real industry needs Uniquely supported by all major political parties SSCs are unique in the world, increasingly emulated by other countries moving to a more demand-led system of workforce training and skills

18 The Sector Skills Council for the creative and cultural industries Sector Skills Councils – examples of impact For every £1 of public investment, SSCs deliver a return of £12, on average, in terms of additional investment in skills Over 1.7 million enterprises and 28 million workers have benefited from having SSCs since People 1 st have improved apprenticeship retention, saving £15 million in wasted public expenditure each year Creative & Cultural Skills have pioneered an online careers and leadership portal – Creative Choices – supporting 190,000 people in the first year

19 The Sector Skills Council for the creative and cultural industries 6 key tests for Sector Skills Councils Is there weak sector demand for skills resulting in poor output or productivity performance? Are education providers (e.g. colleges and universities) being responsive enough to the skills demanded by industrial sectors, particularly in the technical and vocational sphere? Are there entrenched inequalities driven by employers discriminatory attitudes or sector recruitment practices? Is a separate sectoral intervention needed or is there an existing organisation (either sector or geographically based) that could undertake the same role? Is the nature of the sector organisation to be industry-led (independent), social partnership or state-directed? How will sector bodies be financed? (Collective/ industry levies or through general taxation?)

20 The Sector Skills Council for the creative and cultural industries

21 The Sector Skills Council for the creative and cultural industries insanity is doing the same thing over and over again expecting to get different results. Albert Einstein

22 The Sector Skills Council for the creative and cultural industries Tom Bewick Chief Executive Creative & Cultural Skills


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