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Steve Flinders, York Associates and Ian McMaster, Business Spotlight IATEFL 45 th international conference Brighton, UK Sunday, 17 April 2011 Communicating.

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Presentation on theme: "Steve Flinders, York Associates and Ian McMaster, Business Spotlight IATEFL 45 th international conference Brighton, UK Sunday, 17 April 2011 Communicating."— Presentation transcript:

1 Steve Flinders, York Associates and Ian McMaster, Business Spotlight IATEFL 45 th international conference Brighton, UK Sunday, 17 April 2011 Communicating Internationally in English

2 Bob Dignen, director, York Associates, author Ian McMaster, editor-in-chief, Business Spotlight, co-author Steve Flinders, director, York Associates, editor CIE whos who?

3 Objectives of this session 1.To present the book 2.To suggest a future direction for, and a widening of the scope of Business English 3.To get your views and feedback on these

4 Idea for the book Origins Sub title

5 Objectives of the book 1.Written primarily to support intermediate level and above non-native speakers of English who are working internationally 2.Helps people to do business more effectively in English with strategic communication guidelines (not dos and donts) 3.Insightful and useful for business English and communication trainers of non-native speakers

6 Where we are The ELT 6 Presentations Meetings Telephone calls Negotiations Social situations Correspondence The dominant approach constructs Business English communication primarily as a series of events: -differentiated stages -steps within stages -phrases to do the steps (teach language) Cultural knowledge as an add-on (focus on differences at national culture level)

7 7 Where we are going We aim to help international business professionals to communicate clearly and with the right impact in English. Towards an understanding of communication as contextual: Cultural context Interpersonal context International business context Putting language in its place

8 Contents of the book The Basics 1. Speaking 2. Listening 3. Non-verbal skills 4. Native speakers 5. Difficult people Face to Face Skills 6. Relationships 7. Networking 8. Trust 9. Influencing 10. Decisions 11. Conflict 12. Feedback Virtual Skills 13. s: the basics 14. s: advanced 15. Telephoning 16. Conference calls 17. Virtual teams

9 Listening If we were supposed to talk more than listen, we would have two tongues and one ear. Mark Twain, American author and humorist (1835–1910) Reasons for listening What kind of listener are you? Becoming a better listener What do you say?

10 Listening 1.Why should we listen to other people? 2.What kind of listener are you? 3.What stops us from listening effectively? 4.How can you become a better listener? The ROI on listening effectively in the workplace Better relationships with more trust More motivated staff Higher productivity Increased creativity Improved quality More efficient information flow Fewer mistakes and lower costs Happier customers

11 Reasons for listening To get the information we need to complete a task To assess competence and trustworthiness To show competence and trust To show respect and to build rapport To monitor the speakers style in order to achieve better communication To understand how to influence others To empathise To understand the mindset of the other person To hear if our ideas are understood and valued To give pleasure

12 Contents of the book The Basics 1. Speaking 2. Listening 3. Non-verbal skills 4. Native speakers 5. Difficult people Face to Face Skills 6. Relationships 7. Networking 8. Trust 9. Influencing 10. Decisions 11. Conflict 12. Feedback Virtual Skills 13. s: the basics 14. s: advanced 15. Telephoning 16. Conference calls 17. Virtual teams

13 Decisions Nothing is more difficult, and therefore more Precious, than to be able to decide. Napoleon Bonaparte, Emperor of the French (1769–1821) Why is decision-making more difficult? What kind of decision-maker are you? How can you make sure decisions are taken and implemented?

14 What type of decision-maker are you? 1.Directive: need to be in control 2.Analytic: more tolerant of ambiguity 3.Conceptual: information+people 4.Behavioural: prefer consensus Strategies for international meetings Adapt: to the expectations of others Blend: be flexible and mix approaches Co-create: develop a new/unique meeting culture Divide: my way today, your way tomorrow Enforce: tell people to do it my way

15 A good participant... listens to others respectfully commits to implementing decisions on time confirms understanding of decisions negotiates constructively disagrees politely helps the chairperson to facilitate presents opinions concisely The aim of facilitation is to achieve synergy from diversity

16 Contents of the book The Basics 1. Speaking 2. Listening 3. Non-verbal skills 4. Native speakers 5. Difficult people Face to Face Skills 6. Relationships 7. Networking 8. Trust 9. Influencing 10. Decisions 11. Conflict 12. Feedback Virtual Skills 13. s: the basics 14. s: advanced 15. Telephoning 16. Conference calls 17. Virtual teams

17 advanced What is written without effort is in general read without pleasure. Samuel Johnson, English author and lexicographer ( ) Building relationships Influencing business partners Managing conflict

18 From: Bill Benson To: Carole Schlautmann Subject: Jacques Sampers Carole Ive just got back from Manchester where I had a meeting with Jacques. As Jacquess line manager, I am becoming concerned about how much pressure you are putting him under. You know that he is seen as someone with high potential, but he seems to find working with you very demanding. Im not sure that you understand the pressure he is under at the moment – he is managing a huge change project. Anyway, Jacques and I had a long talk today, and he is now confident that he can deliver the results you expect, although we should talk about milestones and deadlines to really make this possible. In future, I think we should communicate more openly to avoid this kind of problem coming up again. Regards Bill managing conflict

19 Dont react too quickly When you judge something negatively, you are probably imposing your own values on the situation. Remember this when you feel negative emotions appearing. Start the habit of re-reading the s you receive. Read for positive intention Look for any positives, even in s that seem to attack you (or others). This allows you to respond more positively. There will always be positives if you are open enough to spot them. Think beyond the person and think about processes s that discuss problems may be a sign of organisational difficulties. Jacques is involved in two projects, which may mean that the company lacks resources. Look at the possible systemic issues behind a conflict and try not to see everything as a clash of personalities. Tips for reading s

20 Immediately: Engaging materials for reading / discussion, possibly as preparation for skills work Tasks which are directly useable in 1:1 and in groups Ideas on how to develop own teaching / coaching approach Coming: Resources for classroom activities Trainer training courses Whats in it for you?

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22 Final thoughts Highly relevant Shift to strategic communication First step towards the future … Tried and tested


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