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2005 Student Symposium Phenix City Intermediate May 14-17, 2005 By Michael Bellamy and Jacob Lee Mrs. Garretts Class Phenix City Intermediate School Phenix.

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Presentation on theme: "2005 Student Symposium Phenix City Intermediate May 14-17, 2005 By Michael Bellamy and Jacob Lee Mrs. Garretts Class Phenix City Intermediate School Phenix."— Presentation transcript:

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2 2005 Student Symposium Phenix City Intermediate May 14-17, 2005 By Michael Bellamy and Jacob Lee Mrs. Garretts Class Phenix City Intermediate School Phenix City, Alabama

3 2005 Student Symposium Phenix City Intermediate May 14-17, 2005 Background Information Cardiac output is how many milliliters of blood your heart pumps in one minute. Blood carries oxygen to your brain and muscles. Oxygen is used by your body for movement and other functions, such as digestion. The heart, lungs, and blood vessels work differently on Earth and in space, so this means that the cardiac output will be different on Earth and in space. The human body needs more oxygen to fuel the muscles when it exercises.

4 2005 Student Symposium Phenix City Intermediate May 14-17, 2005 Objective Recording and analyzing data, using the scientific method to investigate a problem, and multiplying whole numbers.

5 2005 Student Symposium Phenix City Intermediate May 14-17, 2005 Things that Affect your Heart Cardiac output helps determine your heart and cardiovascular systems health. Your cardiac output can be changed if you smoke, drink, or use any other drug. These things will make your heart rate decrease, therefore, causing irregular breathing and heart problems. If you exercise regularly, your heart will grow stronger, and your cardiac output will increase. This could have a positive affect on your body and you would have less risk of heart problems.

6 2005 Student Symposium Phenix City Intermediate May 14-17, 2005 Question How are cardiac output and exercise related, and how does being in space affect your body during exercise?

7 2005 Student Symposium Phenix City Intermediate May 14-17, 2005 Stroke Volume Stroke volume is the amount of blood pushed through the heart during each heartbeat. It is measured in milliliters per beat. It normally remains at about 75 milliliters per beat. In a head-down tilt position, the stroke volume increases to about 90 milliliters per beat, because fluids rush to the upper part of the body and then the heart has more blood to force out with each beat.

8 2005 Student Symposium Phenix City Intermediate May 14-17, 2005 Hypothesis Our hypothesis is that in space, our cardiac output will be greater than it is on Earth, because the heart would work with greater effort and fewer results.

9 2005 Student Symposium Phenix City Intermediate May 14-17, 2005 Materials Watch or clock with a second hand Chair Data sheet Calculator (if wanted)

10 2005 Student Symposium Phenix City Intermediate May 14-17, 2005 Locating Your Pulse To locate your pulse, you put your index finger and your middle finger on the carotid artery, located on the side of your neck.

11 2005 Student Symposium Phenix City Intermediate May 14-17, 2005 Procedure (Part 1) Sitting in a chair, take your resting heart rate. (Take pulse for 10 seconds, then multiply by 6.) Record resting heart rate in data chart. Calculate resting cardiac output by multiplying stroke volume times heart rate. Use 75 ml/beat for stroke volume. (Cardiac output = stroke volume X heart rate) Record resting cardiac output. Stand and do 25 jumping jacks. Take your heart rate immediately after exercise. Record data. Calculate your cardiac output after exercise. Record data.

12 2005 Student Symposium Phenix City Intermediate May 14-17, 2005 Procedure (Part 2) Lay your chair down and take your resting pulse. Next, take your pulse and multiply it by six to get your heart rate. Then take your answer and multiply it by ninety, which is your stroke volume, and get your space simulation estimate. After this, make your exercise estimate by making a jumping jack motion twenty-five times in the reclining position, take your pulse, and calculate as you did before.

13 2005 Student Symposium Phenix City Intermediate May 14-17, 2005

14 2005 Student Symposium Phenix City Intermediate May 14-17, 2005 Ten Second pulse count 10 sec times 6 equals one minute Heart Rate (beat/min) Stroke Volume (ml/beat) Cardiac Output (ml/min) Michael After sitting 22X 6132X 75 =9,990 Michael After exercise 32X 6192X 75 =15,750 Jacob After sitting 13X 678X 75 =5,850 Jacob After exercise 31X 6186X 75 =13,950

15 2005 Student Symposium Phenix City Intermediate May 14-17, 2005 Results Next, we simulated the activity as if we were in space. We did this by calculating in a head tilt position, but instead of using 75, we used 90 for our stroke volume. These results are exceptionally higher than our last results! In our simulated space, we used the same methods as we did with the normal test. Although it was a little tricky to do a head tilt exercise, we got solid results. Our results were up to 22 liters per beat in a head tilt exercise position than in a regular position.

16 2005 Student Symposium Phenix City Intermediate May 14-17, sec pulse count 10 sec times 6 equals one minute Heart rate (beats/min) Stroke Volume (ml/beat) Cardiac Output (ml/min) Michael After head down 31X 6 =186X 90 =16,740 Michael After head down exercise 34X 6 =204X 90 =18,360 Jacob After head down 24X 6 =144X 90 =12,960 Jacob After head down exercise 41X 6 =246X 90 =22,140

17 2005 Student Symposium Phenix City Intermediate May 14-17, 2005 Surprising Results Its surprising how much blood your heart pumps a minute. For instance, one of us pumped nearly 22 liters of blood in a minute after exercising. The heart is a very powerful muscle indeed!!!

18 2005 Student Symposium Phenix City Intermediate May 14-17, 2005 Conclusion During this experiment, we learned a lot about the heart and how powerful it is. We now know that in space your heart has to work much harder.

19 2005 Student Symposium Phenix City Intermediate May 14-17, 2005 Importance This knowledge could be applied to medical science in a way that cardiologists can estimate how much time astronauts can stay in space at one time. This experiment can save lives by recording information on the heart and cardiac output, which could provide information for the VAD, which is the name of the rocket pump part that works with the heart to save lives while you wait for a heart donor.

20 2005 Student Symposium Phenix City Intermediate May 14-17, 2005 Investigating with Fellow Students

21 2005 Student Symposium Phenix City Intermediate May 14-17, 2005 Investigating with Fellow Students

22 2005 Student Symposium Phenix City Intermediate May 14-17, 2005 Students Comments I enjoyed todays presentation. I got tired, but I had fun. -Joah I learned that you find your cardiac output by your pulse. I learned that its different in space and after exercise. -Jerica I learned how to find my pulse. –Jaycie The best part was doing the exercises and then Math. – Terrence

23 2005 Student Symposium Phenix City Intermediate May 14-17, 2005 Having Fun Not only did they exercise their bodies, they exercised their vocal cords!

24 2005 Student Symposium Phenix City Intermediate May 14-17, 2005 Resources We got this investigation from nasaexplorers.com.nasaexplorers.com Presentation from Microsoft Office (PowerPoint) Pictures from Google Pump Your Blood song:

25 2005 Student Symposium Phenix City Intermediate May 14-17, 2005

26 2005 Student Symposium Phenix City Intermediate May 14-17, 2005


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