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To support the personal and intellectual success of every student, every day. Expanding Pathways: College and Career Success for ALL Students STUDENT OUTCOME.

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Presentation on theme: "To support the personal and intellectual success of every student, every day. Expanding Pathways: College and Career Success for ALL Students STUDENT OUTCOME."— Presentation transcript:

1 To support the personal and intellectual success of every student, every day. Expanding Pathways: College and Career Success for ALL Students STUDENT OUTCOME CHART TRAINING Nader I. Twal, High School Office

2 2 Desired Outcomes 1.Create or refine meaningful and inspiring vision/mission statements for each SLC or Pathway Program. 2.Understand the utility, purpose, and process of developing SLC or Pathway Program Student Outcome Charts. 3.Begin developing an SLC or Pathway Program Student Outcome Chart with embedded service learning.

3 3 Agenda 1.Overview of Expanding Pathways – Big Picture Why are we doing this work? 2.Overview of Student Outcome Charts Industry/Pathway Alignment (CTE Framework) 3.Break 4.Crafting a Vision/Mission 5.Lunch 6.Using CTE Standards to design a Student Outcome Chart 7.Embedding Service Learning 8.Defining Next Steps

4 4 Ice Breaker: Consensogram At your tables discuss briefly the following question: How experienced are you in crafting inspiring and meaningful vision/mission statements? Using a Consensogram [next slide], have one person chart where the people in your group fall on the continuum. Have a different person come to the front to transfer your data to the Master Chart.

5 5 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 How experienced are you in crafting inspiring and meaningful vision/mission statements? Little experience Some experience Substantial experience 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

6 6 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 How experienced are you in crafting inspiring and meaningful vision/mission statements? Little experience Some experience Substantial experience Sample 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

7 To support the personal and intellectual success of every student, every day. Why are we doing this? Part of the districts strategic effort to involve classroom-level practitioners in system-wide reform in response to our students, communitys, and local workforce needs.

8 8 Survey Results (from LBUSD Dropouts) Source: Student Survey Conducted in March-May 2009 Data from 52 students that dropped out of LBUSD OPPORTUNITIES 79% said they missed school a lot and were absent 10+ days/semester 74% said they got so far behind in credits that graduation seemed impossible 67% said they did NOT feel connected to school or like they belonged 58% said they were told they wouldnt succeed in life by a teacher or other adult at school 50% said their classes were not interesting and they were often bored in class KEY REASONS CITED FOR DROPPING OUT 1.Behind in credits/knew I wouldnt graduate 2.No interest in school/classes boring 3.The work was difficult and I didnt have/get enough support 4.Not motivated to do what I needed to do 5.Wanted to make money

9 9 Survey Results (from LBUSD Dropouts) Source: Student Survey Conducted in March-May 2009 Data from 52 students that dropped out of LBUSD OPPORTUNITIES 79% said they missed school a lot and were absent 10+ days/semester 74% said they got so far behind in credits that graduation seemed impossible 67% said they did NOT feel connected to school or like they belonged 58% said they were told they wouldnt succeed in life by a teacher or other adult at school 50% said their classes were not interesting and they were often bored in class KEY REASONS CITED FOR DROPPING OUT 1.Behind in credits/knew I wouldnt graduate 2.No interest in school/classes boring 3.The work was difficult and I didnt have/get enough support 4.Not motivated to do what I needed to do 5.Wanted to make money

10 To support the personal and intellectual success of every student, every day. Long Beach Response Academic and Career Success Initiative for ALL Students (ACSI)

11 11 What Is Academic and Career Success? An Effort to Increase College and Career Readiness –It seeks to open multiple pathways for all students. –It aligns district programs and involves higher education partners. –It sets districtwide academic goals and a system to report progress. The Board Initiative –It was unanimously approved by the Board of Education in 2007. –It was based on a series of policy recommendations made by a diverse group of stakeholders. A Part of the Larger Strategic Plan –It is intended to help ensure that all students graduate from high school with as many options as possible.

12 12 Quotes This is one of the most comprehensive initiatives that the school district has ever undertaken, said Christopher J. Steinhauser, LBUSD superintendent of schools. Our students have made great strides in recent years, but they can and will do even better. The initiative was recommended to the school board by a diverse committee of students, parents, employees and community partners. The recommendation came after the committee examined and discussed graduation requirements, college entrance requirements and survey results from more than 20,000 students, teachers, staff and parents.

13 13 Ten Integrated District Efforts In addition to the Seamless Education Partnership and the Long Beach College Promise, the Initiative includes several other integrated district efforts:

14 14 Alignment of ACSI to High School Reform Classroom Instructional Practices Department/SLC PD Evolution/Action Plans Site-Level School Improvement Plan (WASC) High School Office Goals Prepare all students for postsecondary education and careers. Provide intensive interventions to assist them. Enroll and support students in a coherent sequence of rigorous courses. High School Office High School Reform Initiative/District Initiative for Expanding Pathways LBUSD Board of Education/Superintendents Office Academic and Career Success Initiative Instructional practices that support the ACSI, HSRI, and HSO Goals: RRR Framework (Quadrant D) Applied Learning Strategies Interdisciplinary Teaching/Learning High School Reform Initiative 2009-2014 1. Implement a rigorous and relevant multidisciplinary curriculum in the academic core to increase student achievement. 2. Provide all students with a sequenced and aligned technical curriculum, including work- based learning and CTE/ROP experiences, for career exploration. 3. Provide for consistent and sustained support, including prevention and intervention, to ensure that all students achieve their maximum potential. 4. Create a holistic campus climate where relationships, social behavior, and positive professional interactions lead to academic success.

15 To support the personal and intellectual success of every student, every day. HSRI and Expanding Pathways How does the expanding pathways approach support this work?

16 16 Expanding Pathways The expanding pathways approach offers students a choice among several different multi-year programs of study, which combine academic and technical skills, organized around broad industry themes (i.e., biomedical science; engineering; arts, media, entertainment) and prepare students for a full range of postsecondary options, including: 2- and 4- year college/university admission Apprenticeships Military Formal employment training Careers

17 17 Discuss: Begin With The End In Mind By beginning with the end in mind, we increase our quality of life as we define our course and work toward our planned destination. The most effective people mentally plan and then physically create… positive results. If you know what you want to accomplish…, you can define the purpose…, enabling [others] to focus on and meet the intended goals and objectives. Source: Covey, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People Unclear purpose is a major impediment to successful collective action by voluntary coalitions. Adapted from: Implementation of Community Partnerships: Lessons Learned / An EMT Report authored by Joel Phillips and J. Fred Springer, Ph.D.

18 18 Sequence of PD to ensure alignment… Student Outcome Chart Design and Refinement CAPSTONE Development Course of Study Refinement Performance Mapping Training (CL) Course Outline Revision (pt. 1) Performance Mapping Training (9 th and 10 th g. teams) Course Outline Revision (pt. 2) Concurrent Enrollment and Articulation Planning CTE/ROP Course Revision Launch Work-Based Learning SLC Led Processes OCIPD/HSO Led Processes

19 To support the personal and intellectual success of every student, every day. Why Student Outcome Charts? Opportunity for expert practitioners to work in interdisciplinary communities to define what students should know and be able to do within a particular themed course of study. Process that empowers SLC to define their own identity around key industry themes.

20 20 Where do our themes come from?

21 21 Agriculture and Natural Resources

22 22 Alignment to an Industry Sector and then a subsequent Pathway is critical to focusing our work and making sure that students have a coherent educational experience. Recognize that certain sectors (& even pathways) may NATURALLY overlap: Engineering & Construction Arts, Media, Entertainment & Fashion/Interior Design Finance/Business & Marketing, Sales, Services Etc.

23 23 Arts, Media, & Entertainment; Fashion & Interior Design RenaissanceCabrilloJordanLakewoodMillikanPolytechnic High School for the Arts SACMAAETA JMAC The Arts HERO COMPASSMETS

24 24 Engineering, Construction, & Manufacturing; Information Technology; Health & Medical Services CAMSCabrilloJordanLakewoodMillikan Project Lead the Way, Eng. CEDACE JTECH ATMGlobal Tech CAMSCabrilloJordanPoly Project Lead the Way, Biotech CHOCAIMSMAPS

25 25 Public Services; Education and Family Services; Business, Finance, Marketing, & Sales CabrilloJordanMillikanPoly CAL-JPanther Internl PEACEHumanities (Education) CabrilloJordanLakewoodMillikanPoly CAB ISC BESTT (Busns., Tourism, and Hospit.) TCBMBACIC Pac Rim

26 26 Specialized Programs (without Industry Sector) & Other CabrilloJordanLakewoodMillikanPolyWilson University Scholars IBMerit Scholars QUESTPACEDisting. Scholars JordanLakewoodMillikanPoly JFAST (Culinary Arts) OdysseyGREENBeach (Green Tech, Energy and Utilities)

27 27 Think Time Take some time to thumb through the CTE Framework to make sure that your Industry Sector affiliation is clear. Skim the narrative at the beginning to see if it captures some of your group think about your SLC or Pathway Program. Take some time to make sure that you know what pathways you envision your program to address. If you need more time, then please select one sector that you can work with today for the sake of learning the process.

28 28 Industry Sector and Pathway

29 To support the personal and intellectual success of every student, every day. Vision and Mission Adapted from Implementation of Community Partnerships: Lessons Learned / An EMT Report authored by Joel Phillips and J. Fred Springer, Ph.D. & Materials from Purdue Universitys Strategic Business Planning for Commercial Producers & Materials from New Jersey Commission on Higher Education

30 30 VISIONMISSION GOALS AND OUTCOMES Process More broad and future oriented… what we hope to be about. More specific and defines why/how we will get there.

31 31 Why vision and mission? Vision & mission are the glue that help to hold an program together by explaining who you are (reason for being). They describe what you're trying to do (purpose & direction), how you want to go about it, & where you're headed (direction). They mark your unique values. Articulating these things helps to keep your program on track.

32 32 Vision Statement A guiding philosophy Describes the WHAT of an organization Core ideology Core Values - timeless guiding principles Core Purpose - reason for being Envisioned future Supports existing school and district visions

33 33 Activity: Vision Statements 1.Open your envelopes and match the company to its vision and mission statement. 2.Choose 2-3 of the vision statements and discuss: Does each vision statement meet the following criteria? A guiding philosophy Describes the WHAT of an organization Core ideology –Core Values - timeless guiding principles –Core Purpose - reason for being Envisioned future 3.If not, what can be done to improve them?

34 34 Defining the What? Consider your visions and ideas for your SLC as they pertain to your theme Visualize & Draw – What does a graduate of your SLC look like? What words come to mind? Examples of ideas for Agriculture and Natural Resources: Ecological awareness Responsible citizens Stewards of the natural environment Respect for creation and its inhabitants

35 35 Crafting a Vision… Discuss Common Themes Discuss Common Issues Record Common Visions Examples of ideas for Agriculture and Natural Resources: Ecological awareness Responsible citizens Stewards of the natural environment Respect for creation and its inhabitant Using these ideas, create a vision… Smokey the Bear Academy: Every student a responsible, productive steward of the environment and its inhabitants.

36 36 Rubric Checklist How well does our DRAFT vision meet the following criteria? (Qualitative responses, not yes/no) Acts as a guiding philosophy Describes the WHAT of your SLC or Pathway Program Core ideology Core Values - timeless guiding principles Core Purpose - reason for being Envisioned future Supports existing school and district visions

37 37 Mission Statement The mission statement of an organization typically contains the following elements: Provides a concise statement of WHY the organization exists, and what it is to achieve; States the purpose and identity of the organization; Aligns with the institution's values and philosophy (expressed in the vision); and Describes HOW the organization will serve those affected by its work.

38 38 Draft Mission Statement Format The mission of our SLC is… WHY we exist HOW we will get there Examples from the real world: To reduce alcohol and other drug use by youth through collaboration, education and policy change. "To promote child health and development through a comprehensive family and community initiative." "To create a thriving community through development of jobs, education, housing, and cultural pride. "To develop a safe and healthy neighborhood through collaborative planning, community action, policy advocacy and enforcement."

39 39 Draft Mission Statement Format The mission of our SLC is… WHY we exist HOW we will get there Examples from the real world: To reduce alcohol and other drug use by youth through collaboration, education and policy change. "To promote child health and development through a comprehensive family and community initiative." "To create a thriving community through development of jobs, education, housing, and cultural pride. "To develop a safe and healthy neighborhood through collaborative planning, community action, policy advocacy and enforcement."

40 40 Draft Mission Statement Format The mission of our SLC is… WHY we exist HOW we will get there Examples from the real world: To reduce alcohol and other drug use by youth through collaboration, education and policy change. "To promote child health and development through a comprehensive family and community initiative." "To create a thriving community through development of jobs, education, housing, and cultural pride. "To develop a safe and healthy neighborhood through collaborative planning, community action, policy advocacy and enforcement."

41 41 Crafting a Mission… The Smokey the Bear Academy seeks to develop environmentally- informed, well-educated stewards of nature through an integrated academic curriculum, real-world experiences, and opportunities for advocacy in the local community.

42 42 Crafting a Mission… The Smokey the Bear Academy seeks to develop environmentally- informed, well-educated stewards of nature through an integrated academic curriculum, real-world experiences, and opportunities for advocacy in the local community. WHY?

43 43 Crafting a Mission… The Smokey the Bear Academy seeks to develop environmentally- informed, well-educated stewards of nature through an integrated academic curriculum, real-world experiences, and opportunities for advocacy in the local community. HOW?

44 44 Rubric Checklist for Mission Statements: How well does our mission statement meet the following criteria? (Qualitative responses) Provides a concise statement of WHY the organization exists, and what it is to achieve; States the purpose and identity of the organization; Aligns with the institution's values and philosophy (expressed in the vision); and Describes HOW the organization will serve those affected by its work.

45 45

46 46 (see samples) Student Outcomes…. focus on those skills and abilities most critical to success within your career theme. So where do these come from?

47 47 CDE Industry Sectors/Pathways

48 48 Foundation Standards Foundation Standards are the 11 core standards all students need to master to be successful in the CTE curriculum and in the workplace. These standards are similar to SCANS. The foundation standards are uniform in all sectors, although the subcomponents will differ. Framework – pages xvi - xvii

49 49 Foundation Standards They cover the 11 areas essential to all students success: 1.0 Academics 2.0 Communications 3.0 Career Planning and Management 4.0 Technology 5.0 Problem Solving and Critical Thinking 6.0 Health and Safety 7.0 Responsibility and Flexibility 8.0 Ethics and Legal Responsibilities 9.0 Leadership and Teamwork 10.0 Technical Knowledge and Skills 11.0 Demonstration and Application Framework – pages xvi - xvii

50 50 For each industry sector…

51 51 Pathway Standards The pathway standards are concise statements that reflect the essential knowledge and skills students are expected to master to be successful in the career pathway. Each career pathway comprises 3 to 12 standards with 2 to 6 subcomponents per standard. Framework – pages xvi - xvii

52 52 Agriculture and Natural Resources

53 53 Define Attributes of Students in this Pathway… Strategy: Unpacking Standards & Affinity Mapping Find your Pathway Standards & divide them up. Informally unpack the standards to see: What content do students need to know? What students should be able to do? –Consider the level of rigor (Blooms Taxonomy) –Skills that students might need to master to meet/exceed the standard Consider what standards and subcomponents are in Quadrants B/D. Maybe focus attention here. Look for themes/patterns/affinities that emerge from this process and use those to define your students 3-5 attributes.

54 54 Sample of Unpacking a Standard… Standard Agriculture and Natural Resources D2.0 – Students understand the key principles of animal nutrition. Standard Subcomponent Agriculture and Natural Resources D2.3 – Understand the digestive processes of the ruminant, monogastric, avian, and equine digestive systems. What do students need to know? Names of the 4 types of digestive systems Names of the parts of the digestive system Order of the parts of the digestive system Function of each part of the digestive system Definition of osmosis and absorption Lab report write-up What should students be able to do? At what level? Explain osmosis and absorption and demonstrate the process (C) Dissect and identify the parts of the digestive system (Ap) Determine what kind of system is being dissected (An) Describe the physical characteristics of the digestive tract contents and specific locations (K/C) Explain the function of each part and the relationship of the structure to the function (C) Examine rumen content under a microscope (An) Write a lab report (varies) What quadrant is this standard written to? Quadrants A/C primarily

55 55 Ecologically responsible Ethically informed Biomedically aware?

56 56 Student Outcomes… Are observable, measurable results or evidence of the educational experience. They may be things the program wants: students to know (cognitive), ways students think (affective/ attitudinal), or things students should be able to do (behavioral, performance, psychomotor). They are detailed & meaningful enough to guide decisions in program planning & improvement, & decisions about pedagogy & practice. NOT ACTIVITIES. These statements use active verbs, such as create, compose, calculate, develop, build, evaluate, translate, etc. From CUPR Common Language doc

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61 61 May need to revisit the verbiage to make sure that outcomes are measurable and observable.

62 62 Embed Service Learning Look for themes that emerge by grade-level and consider how your team can focus the service learning experiences of students in your academy through, but not limited to,… Focused Field Trips Volunteer Opportunities In-class projects coordinated with local agencies Etc…

63 63

64 64 Next Steps Student Outcome Chart Design and Refinement CAPSTONE Development APRIL 29 Course of Study Refinement MAY - JUNE Performance Mapping Training (CL) Course Outline Revision (pt. 1) Performance Mapping Training (9 th and 10 th g. teams) SUMMER 2010 Course Outline Revision (pt. 2) Concurrent Enrollment and Articulation Planning CTE/ROP Course Revision Launch Work-Based Learning SLC Led Processes OCIPD/HSO Led Processes SUBMIT REQUESTS FOR EXPENDITURE IF NEED RELEASE TIME.


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