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LANDSCAPES AND LOCAL HERITAGE Along the Stevenson Trail Part 4.

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Presentation on theme: "LANDSCAPES AND LOCAL HERITAGE Along the Stevenson Trail Part 4."— Presentation transcript:

1 LANDSCAPES AND LOCAL HERITAGE Along the Stevenson Trail Part 4

2 Le Pont-de-Montvert The Catholics wanted to oblige the Protestants to be converted to Catholicism. This led to the religious « War of the Camisards » in In the 19 century the culture of the mulberry tree for the industry of the silk worms made the wealth of « Le Pont de Montvert ». The so-called « bread-fruit» tree, or chestnut-tree, supplied the local population with food for generations of «Cévenols » (people from the Cévennes region). Chestnuts provided the basic nourishment for the inhabitants. They fed their pigs with them too. They sold them to the city dwellers, either fresh in autumn, or dried to make soup with or as flour (gluten free) to make cakes or bread.

3 Florac (545 m) This small town attracts many tourists in summer. The river Tarn offers all the water sports: Canoe, whitewater rafting, cannyoning, fishing… Rock climbing is available at the Rock of Rochefort (1066m). Nature lovers will also practise hiking, mountain bike or horseback riding. Its castle, built in 1652, was destroyed in the wars of religion. It was restored and it has been the headquarters of the Cévennes National Park since The Peach Tree is the name given to this spring. It lies at heart of the city. Since 2001, the city has organised The Soup Festival. It lasts for 3 days. Its the opportunity to have fun with the marching bands. Concerts are held, the streets are busy with the various festivities.

4 Saint Germain de Calberte (489m) -This small village surrounded with chestnut trees, is overlooked by the ruins of the castle of Calberte, a stronghold which witnessed the War of the Camisards in On its steep slopes, the farmers cultivate their land in terraces. - In the 19th century the mulberry trees were used in silk farms for silk worm breeding. - The silk worms produced natural silk. In the 20th century all the silk farms closed down due to artificial silk industry from China. A silk farm restored into a nice country cottage Worm breeding


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