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Claims A claim, or thesis, is the central argument of your paper. It should be something substantive enough that a reader could be convinced of it and.

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Presentation on theme: "Claims A claim, or thesis, is the central argument of your paper. It should be something substantive enough that a reader could be convinced of it and."— Presentation transcript:

1 Claims A claim, or thesis, is the central argument of your paper. It should be something substantive enough that a reader could be convinced of it and narrow enough that a reader can understand the need for your argument.

2 A claim must be Substantive Contestable Specific

3 A substantive claim Engages the readers interest by doing more than restating the writers process (1) or summarizing data (2). A substantive claim does not say: (1) I have examined the role of the Federal Reserve Board in the recession. or (2) This paper will discuss the role of OPEC in the recession of A substantive claim does say: –The recession did not occur because OPEC raised prices but mainly because the Federal Reserve tightened the money supply.

4 A contestable claim Readers want to read a claim that makes them think differently about something they have pondered in the past or about something they have never thought of before. They want to think Youll have to explain that. A contestable claim can be argued by disputing facts or reinterpreting them. A contestable claim reflects knowledge of the field of study and can offer a new way of looking at the subject. For instance, your contestable claim may argue against acknowledged authority.

5 A specific claim Is composed of terms that will later be defined and supported with evidence in the body of the paper. The reader will want to see developed in the paper. –Gendered communication patterns in early childhood correlate strongly to ethical decision-making patterns in adult life and codify structures and modes of truth-telling.

6 A specific claim Can be used to guide you in selecting the evidence you will use to support your point. Gendered communication behaviors in early childhood correlate strongly to ethical decision-making patterns in adult life and codify structures and modes of truth-telling. 1. How are communication behaviors gendered? 2. How is ethical decision-making defined? 3. How great is the correlation? 4. Which structures and modes of truth telling were studied? 5. How were they codified? 6. What are the implications of this correlation?

7 Assessing the Claim Essential to every research process is conversation. In order to articulate your ideas, you must subject them to the scrutiny of others. The feedback that you get from honestly puzzled and interested listeners will help you clarify your thinking and your writing process.

8 Partnered discussion Reader –What is your point? –What is your evidence? –Why do you think your evidence supports your claim? –But what about…? –Are you entirely sure? –But what about…? –Then how strong is your claim? Writer –I claim that…. –I offer as evidence… –I offer this general principle… –I can answer that… –Only if….as long as… –I must concede that… –I limit my claim by/with…

9 How to have the conversation 1.Write your claim. 2.Give your written claim to your partner (reader). 3.Reader asks questions and transcribes answers to the first three questions. 4.Reader looks for possible exceptions, definable terms, areas for more research and transcribes answers to the last four questions. 5.Writer talks, Reader listens and questions. 6.Switch roles and do the same thing with the other paper.


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