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S= Semester Y= Year YearRequired Courses/Elective Courses FreshmanWorld Studies (Y) SophomoreContemporary World Issues (S) or World History A.P. (Y) or.

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Presentation on theme: "S= Semester Y= Year YearRequired Courses/Elective Courses FreshmanWorld Studies (Y) SophomoreContemporary World Issues (S) or World History A.P. (Y) or."— Presentation transcript:

1 S= Semester Y= Year YearRequired Courses/Elective Courses FreshmanWorld Studies (Y) SophomoreContemporary World Issues (S) or World History A.P. (Y) or European History A.P. (Y) Psychology (S) JuniorUnited States History (Y) or United States History A.P. (Y) SeniorCivics (S) /Economics (S) World History A.P. (Y) European History A.P. (Y) Psychology (S)

2 Required Sophomore Choices World History Advanced Placement (WHAP) --- (year-long) European History Advanced Placement (MEHAP) --- (year-long) Contemporary World Issues (CWI) --- (semester) Sophomore Elective Psychology --- (semester)

3 CWI Roughly 1/2 hour of homework on most nights Covers modern world history from WWII-Present (continues where World Studies ended) Class activities include lecture/class discussion, role-plays/simulations, group activities, and research. Types of evaluation include multiple-choice tests, in-class essays, oral reports, class participation, and research products.

4 WHAP v. MEHAP At least one hour of homework on most nights, but at times 2 hours a night is required. Covers World History from 8000 BCE-Present Fast paced college level analysis of political, economic and social developments of each era Preparation for Advanced Placement test in May At least one hour of homework on most nights, but at times 2 hours a night is required. Covers European History from 1400-present Fast paced college level analysis of political, economic and social developments of each era Preparation for Advanced Placement test in May

5 WHAP v. MEHAP cont. In-class Activities include Lecture/Class discussion, Writing Activities, Group reviews, and Research Types of evaluation include Multiple-choice tests, In-class essays, Oral reports, Class participation, Research products In-class Activities include Lecture/Class discussion, Writing Activities, Group reviews, and Research Types of evaluation include Multiple-choice tests, In-class essays, Oral reports, Class participation, Research products

6 Psychology Group and pair work, discussions, experiments, optical art, role playing, guest speakers, related films Evaluation involves individual and group projects, short answer and short essay tests, application of theories to self and larger community

7 Psychology min. reading, STAR notes, or projects 4 nights a week. College prep text Students learn about themselves and the reasons behind their thinking and actions.

8 Junior Choices United States History Advanced Placement (USHAP) From 1600 to Present Fast paced college level analysis in preparation for the AP test United States History 1900 to the present, preceded by a one month review of pre concepts

9 USHAP v. USH Class Activities Daily verbal responses required Concept mapping Primary source analysis Small group and whole class presentations Philosophical chairs Interactive activities and simulations Homework review and discussion Video clips and slides Debate and discussion Presentations

10 USHAP v. USH Homework 10 pages of reading, 5 nights a week Written STAR notes and response to summary questions Independent, self- motivated learning 5 to 8 pages of reading 3-5 times a week Written STAR notes or other notes Paragraphs or reading analysis

11 USHAP v. USH Evaluations Exams: –Multiple choice and essays (no notes) –College level vocabulary and analysis –Comprehensive final –Year-long presentation project Exams: –Multiple Choice –Essay –Short Answer –Analysis and Opinion –Project Presentations

12 Required Senior Classes Civics --- (semester) Economics --- (semester) Senior Electives Psychology --- (semester) WHAP --- (year-long) MEHAP --- (year-long)

13 Reasons to take an AP Class You LOVE History You want your brain to grow and become more efficient You want to challenge yourself You want to think deeply about things You want to get into a good college You want to save some money on college tuition You want a good, steady, well paying Job someday soon. You want to learn how to write the kind of essay that will get you into any program in the world You want to learn how to read and process a lot of information effectively

14 Reasons Not to take an AP Class You are already taking 2 or more AP or Honors classes in other subjects You are planning to participate seriously in sports (3 or more hours daily) You have extensive extracurricular obligations (Cheer, Band, Job, Music Career, Family, etc for 3 or more hours daily) You Hate History You Hate reading, even subjects you are interested in

15 Please Notice…. I dont know how…. Is not one of the reasons to avoid an AP class. These skills are so essential, and these classes are seen as so significant by power holders, that if you sign up and put in the work, we will get you from where you are to where you need to be. We Promise


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